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Lens dilemma for Kenya-Masai Mara

kenya photograpy masai mara lenses Nikon

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84 replies to this topic

#81 Alexander33

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 06:20 PM

@AmyT

Just keep using it. Practice a lot. That will be the ideal workout, too! I thought it was kind of heavy as well, until I got the 200-500. Now I think it's pretty light. It's all relative....
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#82 xelas

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:21 AM

@AmyT , same words as above. Keep using the lens, forget about the monopod, after a few weeks you will adapt to the weight. My wife has had the same comment at first for 200-500, now she likes the it; only thing is she dislike to carry it around  :rolleyes: .


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#83 pault

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:42 AM

@AmyT if you do use a monopod make sure you attach it to the lens collar and not the camera . Also when you carry it. Reasons 1) balance 2) no crash! bang! due to absence of 1)

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#84 pault

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:15 AM

I know I was called to comment and didn't but better you hear from Nikon uisers and you did. Anyway, you bought the lens I would have bought were I a Nikon user and in your shoes.

 

Definitely work out - it is good for you. However, I don't know your physical size so if you are super-petite or have a bad neck you may want to use a monopod. Most of the time you will be happy with a beanbag but there are times when that doesn't work. However, a beanbag is generally better unless - like me for a couple of years - you can't  bend over to beanbag height without serious pain (and in that case, even more reason to work out!!)  so if you do use a monopod you should get some kind of set up whereby you can switch to a beanbag super quickly, without dropping the lens or allowing the monpod to crash to the floor, scaring off the wildlife.. :o  That will take some practice and trial and error.


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#85 Dave Williams

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 06:34 AM

My first lens was the 80-400 with a D200. I thought it was gigantic and bought a tripod and a pistol grip type tripod head which I used nearly all the time. I graduated on the the 300f2.8 which had my jaw dropping when I opened the packaging and saw the beast inside. Definitely needed a new tripod head for that so I bought a Wimberley. Next up was a 500mm f4 and  the 300mm was no longer that big. It became my walkabout lens and was never tripod mounted. Eventually I swopped over to Nikon as I was made an offer I couldn't refuse by a friend who had a 600mm f4 Mk1.

That is a beast. He couldn't cope anymore as he had back problems. I couldn't hand hold that for more than a few seconds and eventually traded if for a much lighter 500mm f4 Mk2. The young guy that bought it was a stonemason who was built like Rocky so no problems there.

Meanwhile I have discovered that it isn't the size of the lens that my other half doesn't get on with, it's the size of the camera because she only has small hands as most ladies do.Reaching the buttons on a Canon 1D or Nikon D5 isn't an easy task.

However going back to weight and support I still like to use a tripod when it's practical because the less likely hood of movement the sharper the image and the lower the shutter speed you might be able to use which in turn reduces the ISO and gives a better dynamic range. I also find you can compose the picture better too. The benefit of a tripod is it's free standing. The downside is it's heavier and more cumbersome, 

I have never owned a monopod as although it offers support it's not free standing and you have to keep hold it all the time so if you are in a position waiting for something to happen I imagine that is hard work.

For both monopod and tripod your movement is more limited which means your reaction to events is likely to be slower too so perhaps the answer is to get something like a Black Rapid  camera /lens strap. That enables the weight of your outfit to be spread more evenly than the single downforce on one shoulder. I don't have one but I was recommended by a friend who says he wanders around happily with his 500mm f4 and it's ready for action instantly. The only problem I foresee is that ladies might find that it's not quite so free moving depending on bust size. Worth investigating though.

Enjoy the lens, a good decision in my opinion!


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