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Tamron 16 - 300mm F3.5 - F6.3 for Canon 1200D


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#1 Julian

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 06:45 PM

Hi
We have two Canon cameras - a 60D and a 1200D, which we used on our Tanzania safari last year with Canon lenses - 100-400, 17-55 f 2.8 , and 10-16.
On our cameras , with the smaller sensors, these focal ranges become 160-640, 27-88, and 16-26.
These were fine but did require some changing of lenses on the camera bodies quite often, and as you can see none of them cover the focal range bewtween 90 and 160.

Also, changing lenses frequently caused marks on the sensor of the cameras which we hope tomavoid in future ( we also intend to buy a third camera body -another 1200D which only cost around £ 200.)

My lovely lady, who is relatively new to SLR photography, would prefer one lens that could offer a range from wide angle to a considerable zoom, without being heavy. The Tamron 16-300 ( which is 26 - 480 on our cameras ) is a short lens that weighs little, and seems to be ideal for what she wants. It is also relatively cheap - as lttle as £360.

(We dont want to pay a lot and the nearest equivalent Canon would be a 28- 300 ( 45 -460) which costs around £1500 and with a minimum focal range of 45, on our cameras, does not provide for wide angle shots.)

My question is, do any Safaritalk members have experience of this Tamron lens?
Do any of you know any specific shortcomings of why this would not be a good lens to use on our next safari.
Is there anything else , with a similar range , that would be a better buy ( £1000 maximum cost) ?

#2 ZaminOz

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Posted 24 June 2016 - 03:14 AM

HI Julian

 

I haven't used the particular lens that you refer to. I do however always take my Pentax 18-270 with me on Safaris. My main lenses are a Sigma 50-500 and a Sigma 70-200 f2.8, however I always have the 18-270 with me as well and use it for walking safaris (easier to walk around with) and for general "around the camp" photos. My wife has a Sigma 18-250 on her DSLR which is the only lens she uses in daylight (for night drives she switches to a Sigma 50-150 f2.8 for the wider aperture).

 

In my view both the Pentax 18-270 (which was really a rebranded version of the Tamron 18-270) and the Sigma 18-250 are good lenses (for what they are). Obviously all of these types of lens suffer a little at the longer end in comparison to professional grade lenses, but then you are not forking out a professional grade price. However if you have image stabilisation going they are still useable. Also the modern versions of these lenses are far better than the earlier versions from +/-10 years ago.

 

My Australian Shelduck photos in the "Tag a Safaritalker" thread in the Birding forums where taken with an older Pentax 18-250 at about +/- 250mm (and then cropped a little).


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#3 Julian

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Posted 24 June 2016 - 02:46 PM

HI Julian
 
I haven't used the particular lens that you refer to. I do however always take my Pentax 18-270 with me on Safaris. My main lenses are a Sigma 50-500 and a Sigma 70-200 f2.8, however I always have the 18-270 with me as well and use it for walking safaris (easier to walk around with) and for general "around the camp" photos. My wife has a Sigma 18-250 on her DSLR which is the only lens she uses in daylight (for night drives she switches to a Sigma 50-150 f2.8 for the wider aperture).
 
In my view both the Pentax 18-270 (which was really a rebranded version of the Tamron 18-270) and the Sigma 18-250 are good lenses (for what they are). Obviously all of these types of lens suffer a little at the longer end in comparison to professional grade lenses, but then you are not forking out a professional grade price. However if you have image stabilisation going they are still useable. Also the modern versions of these lenses are far better than the earlier versions from +/-10 years ago.
 
My Australian Shelduck photos in the "Tag a Safaritalker" thread in the Birding forums where taken with an older Pentax 18-250 at about +/- 250mm (and then cropped a little).

Thanks ZaminOz
This is really helpful, and we hadnt considered the advantage of it on a walking safari and as our next safari will be to Zambia in 2017, where we will do more walking safaris than usual, its yet another good reason for us to buy it.
We have read enough reviews to know its a good buy.
Weve just ordered the Tamron lens for a good price - £ 337.

Edited by Julian, 24 June 2016 - 02:47 PM.

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#4 Tango

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 03:00 PM

Julian - I used a Canon 60D mated with a Tamron 18-270 on my first safari and it worked well for me as my all-around lens. I also had a Canon 100-400 (trombone version) for the longer shots.  I believe the Tamron 16-300 will serve your lady well.

 

Jeff


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#5 ZaminOz

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 02:58 AM

Hi @Julian

 

I should have added previously that I strongly recommend that you invest in a 70-200mm f2.8 lens for the night drives in Zambia as none of the lenses that you listed in your opening post will be able to handle the night drive conditions well enough.

There are currently x2 Canon, x1 Tamron and x1 Sigma options available on the market (for Canon). Better to get the optically stabilised / hypersonic motor versions.


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