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The Sacred Combe by Simon Barnes

Luangwa Valley

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#1 Caracal

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 07:30 AM

The central theme of this book is that everyone has a special place, a spiritual home.

 

Simon Barnes discovered that his special place is the Luangwa Valley. He’s returned there numerous times.

 

The main thread through the book is the Luangwa and its wildlife but also nature around his home in Norfolk and other spots.

 

The book consists of short chapters and is a kaleidoscope of observations of wildlife and nature, notes, memories, thoughts on conservation and the author’s philosophies on life, love and loss.

 

I think the book will have a general appeal to many including those who haven't been to Africa.  I certainly enjoyed the book but such enjoyment may have been enhanced by the fact that I familiar with the Luangwa and am familiar with some of the author’s previous works having read How To Be A Bad Birdwatcher and also an article he wrote in the Times about a visit he made to the RSPB reserve at Cattawade Suffolk where one of my nephews was the warden at the time.

 

I think the author's mistaken when he lists Chacma Baboon in his list of mammals seen in North Luangwa. This should I think be Yellow Baboon – maybe I’m being picky! Don't let  that put you off there are many and varied interesting observations.


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"Moments that touch the soul are always short but they echo pleasantly afterwards"
Stephen Pern - Another Land, Another Sea Walking round Lake Rudolph.

#2 Safaridude

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 10:20 AM

@Caracal

 

I thoroughly enjoyed Simon Barnes' other book, Rogue Lions Safaris, which I reviewed here:  http://safaritalk.ne...y-simon-barnes/

 

It was also based on the Luangwa Valley, but Luangwa was never mentioned in the book (it's a fiction).


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#3 Caracal

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 07:07 AM

Thanks for your recommendation @Safaridude - will add it to my rather lengthy list of books to be read.

 

My problem is my list is getting longer whilst the years ahead are rapidly getting shorter!


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"Moments that touch the soul are always short but they echo pleasantly afterwards"
Stephen Pern - Another Land, Another Sea Walking round Lake Rudolph.

#4 Treepol

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 03:08 AM

@Caracal thanks for the heads-up on the new Simon Barnes, I'll give it a try.

 

Like @Safaridude I have read and re-read Rogue Lion Safaris and laughed out loud in a few places.


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