Jump to content




See all Safaritalk Special Offers

Message to Guests.

Welcome to Safaritalk where we have been talking Safaris and wildlife conservation since 2006. As a guest you're welcome to read through certain areas of the forum, but to access all the facilities and to contribute your experience, ask questions and get involved, you'll need to be a member - so register here: it's quick, free and easy and I look forward to having you as a Safaritalker soon. Matt.


Photo

The Ugly Side of Wildlife Photography

photography ethics india safari guiding

  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#21 Peter Connan

Peter Connan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,987 posts
  • Local time: 12:02 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gauteng, South Africa
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:---

Posted 17 April 2016 - 08:19 AM

The article gives the impression that this type of behaviour is new. This is unfortunately not true at all.

If the party in the video had made this journey 150 hears ago, they would probably have left a trail of carcasses in their wake instead of some mildly traumatized ones.

The problem is not that we have suddenly become more selfish, insensitive and downright stupid, but that we have become more, and that technology has made it easier, thus that people who may never have wanted to endure the hardship that was Safari life 50 years ago can now experience these marvels in comfort.

Of course, were it not for those same technologies allowing us to live and produce food in smaller areas, there would probably be no wildlife areas left, so in the final analysis the real problem, the elephant in the room, is human overpopulation.

Still, this type of behaviour is stupid and selfish in the extreme.
  • Atravelynn, Geoff, Caracal and 4 others like this
Ek oefen skelm.

#22 Tomas

Tomas

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Local time: 01:02 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iringa Tanzania
  • Category 1:Tour Operator
  • Category 2:Resident in Africa/Former resident

Posted 17 April 2016 - 03:31 PM


Of course, were it not for those same technologies allowing us to live and produce food in smaller areas, there would probably be no wildlife areas left, so in the final analysis the real problem, the elephant in the room, is human overpopulation.
 

I can agree that this is not something new it is just more people that have no real feeling or understanding for nature and it just shows in a different way than before. Lack of respect just in a different way than before.

But overpopulation I don't really agree with, of course there are more people and that mean that we have to use our recourses more smartly and to stop the raising curve soon. BUT a lot of African countries is not near as overpopulated as European ones.


The problem I think is corruption, no education and a misuse of the natural recourses, to blame it on overpopulation is too easy. Africa has bigger issues than overpopulation

It is not that people are wrong there is more that they have preconceived ideas about overpopulation, so people do not really know I thought the same before I went to university late in life, or late for me (o; just a few years back

Look at this https://www.youtube....h?v=eA5BM7CE5-8 For a different view I love Hans Rosling and this is really good hold out to the end.

But this maybe is more ok to post in another thread.


  • Atravelynn likes this

#23 Peter Connan

Peter Connan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,987 posts
  • Local time: 12:02 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gauteng, South Africa
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:---

Posted 18 April 2016 - 04:32 AM

For sure there is a lot of mismanagement of resources too, but southern Africa's population is rapidly reaching the point where the requirement for water is outstripping the supply.

Population here cannot be directly compared with that of europe because of the lower rainfall, the consequence being that far more land is needed to raise food per person, and attempts to raise more food per unit area is rapidly turning large tracts of land into deserts.
  • pault, offshorebirder and Tomas like this
Ek oefen skelm.

#24 penolva

penolva

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 713 posts
  • Local time: 10:02 AM
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cornwall UK
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 30 April 2016 - 03:57 PM

It seems like having a pamphlet of wildlife photography etiquette rules would be a particularly good thing for self-driving car rental companies to give out with each rental.

 

I recently ran across a Youtube video that seems to be an example of what @Atravelynn quoted - "to be seen roaming in the wilderness all the time and posting stunning photographs is perceived as cool."

 

It was made by some self-drivers through Botswana, Namibia and Zambia.   It is slick and well-produced with some good aspects but also some behavior I think we can all agree is over the line (like throwing meat at a Lion resting in the shade at the 2:30 mark).

 

 

Total lack of respect for the animals  :angry: and a drone. I hate those things, should be banned. Pen


  • ZaminOz, offshorebirder and Tomas like this

#25 43Shooter

43Shooter

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Local time: 11:02 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Wildlife Photographer/Artist
  • Category 2:---

Posted 04 August 2016 - 08:04 PM

Being young strong and stupid ..is this storyteller advising to all other visitors ! 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: photography, ethics, india, safari, guiding


© 2006 - 2016 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.

Welcome guest to Safaritalk.
Please Register or Login to use the full facilities.