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COSMIC RHINO

major reports of illegal wildlife trade eles, rhinos etc

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well this is nothing new , things are going on ,the entire Sth African  strategy  on rhino protection is a failure ,and they have the nerve to think that it does not matter that much

here is a new report from Wildaid documenting the failures

 

South Africa shoots rhino poachers, but lets kingpins walk, new report finds

May 16, 2017

Failure%20to%20Prosecute%20Cover_0.jpgRhino poaching middlemen and kingpins continue to operate with impunity in South Africa, according to a new WildAid report, which reveals how the country has failed to prosecute or sufficiently punish those arrested for high level involvement in rhino crimes.

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now there is pressure on elephants from Chinese medicine 

 

it does not work

at the moments it is Chinese visiting a nearby country , but who knows where things like this could  end

 

 

Neighbouring China is the main destination for elephant products. Despite the ivory ban imposed by the Chinese government earlier this year, ivory is still the most valuable part of the elephant. But worryingly conservationists are now seeing a growing demand for other parts of the animal; trunks, feet, even the penis, to be used in traditional medicine. The hide or skin, which is believed to be a remedy for eczema, is particularly in demand.

 

please see 

Demand for elephant skin, trunk and penis drives rapid rise in poaching in Myanmar
Axel Kronholm, The Guardian

June 7, 2017

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/07/demand-elephant-products-drives-dramatic-rise-poaching-myanmar

 

 

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2 hours ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

now there is pressure on elephants from Chinese medicine it does not work

at the moments it is Chinese visiting a nearby country , but who knows where things like this could  end

 

Neighbouring China is the main destination for elephant products. Despite the ivory ban imposed by the Chinese government earlier this year, ivory is still the most valuable part of the elephant. But worryingly conservationists are now seeing a growing demand for other parts of the animal; trunks, feet, even the penis, to be used in traditional medicine. The hide or skin, which is believed to be a remedy for eczema, is particularly in demand.

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

The rapacious demand for wild animal parts in the country where I work never seems to diminish.

 

As you've noted, there's a growing demand here, as using such products is deemed to be fashionable.

 

Tom K.

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here  is a interesting report ,a journalist posed as a customer and went to visit shops

 

How Laos’ Black Market Undermines China’s Ivory Ban
Shi Yi, Sixth Tone/The Paper
June 6, 2017

See 
link for video & photo.


VIENTIANE, Laos: As tour buses pull up in front of San Jiang Market, not far from Wattay International Airport, a guide beckons to a group of Chinese tourists. They soon disappear into the jungle of shops bearing signs in Chinese characters, many of which sell “local specialties,” or any illicit wildlife product imaginable.

From elephant tusk, rhinoceros horn, and tiger bone to shells of the critically endangered hawksbill turtle, most of these products are displayed openly on store shelves here, despite being subject to longstanding controls or bans on their trade.

If you’re really looking for something, then go with this,” Vuong said, grabbing a box of ivory Buddhist amulets. “They’re small and perfect for gifts, and you can wear several at a time.”

 

http://www.sixthtone.com/news/1000305/how-laos-black-market-undermines-chinas-ivory-ban

 

Vietnam.Laos  and other countries in the area have a major problem with an out of control illegal wildlife trade

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Game theory suggests China should keep its ivory trade ban in place indefinitely

 

It’s no exaggeration to say that African elephants are in grave danger. The forest elephant, native to Central Africa, is on the edge of extinction. Savanna elephants, in southern Africa, are being poached at a rate of roughly 27,000 a year.

This is far higher than the rate at which the species can reproduce. It’s stating the obvious to say that this is unsustainable. 

 

http://theconversation.com/game-theory-suggests-china-should-keep-its-ivory-trade-ban-in-place-indefinitely-78613?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest from The Conversation for June 9 2017 - 75785882&utm_content=Latest from The Conversation for June 9 2017 - 75785882+CID_a4aaa72cf511be7a5ce8c240159e1a48&utm_source=campaign_monitor_africa&utm_term=Game theory suggests China should keep its ivory trade ban in place indefinitely

 

the commentator suggests an indefinite ban on chinese ivory sales

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ivory prices are down but the true meaning of this is unclear

 

major dealers may be stockpiling in the hope of future sales

 

at a lower price for kg, their available funds covers the killing of more elephants

 

please see

 

China's ivory ban sparks dramatic drop in prices across Asia
Naomi Larsson, The Guardian
June 2, 2017

 

Signs of stockpiling were also spotted by the WJC investigators in Vietnam. In early 2016 investigators were "told by an ivory trader that due to the low price and the gloomy ivory market, a few Chinese ‘big bosses’, who can afford it, were stockpiling up the ivory and not selling out, in order to reduce the supply and push up the price".

There is also no sign of a corresponding decline in poaching. "I see no decline," said Stiles. "That to me means a drop in price is actually bad for elephants. Because these guys can buy more ivory for the same amount of money as before.


However, Stiles is keen to stress that it is still too early to see the full impact on poaching across Africa from China’s domestic ivory ban, which will be fully enforced at the end of this year. "Let’s see where we are at the beginning of 2019. If poaching rates haven’t gone down significantly by then, then elephants are in real trouble."

Many conservationists believe that the ban is pointing in the right direction for elephants, with Verheij from the WJC saying, "It’s really encouraging".

Vigne agrees and points out that in the future this ban will have an impact on the big trading networks. "If they have any sense they won’t want to trade if the prices are dropping like that," she said. But ultimately, she added, the key is law enforcement. "Punishment is the biggest deterrent. That’s what has to be focused, so the illegal markets will slowly become marginalised."

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/02/chinas-ivory-ban-sparks-dramatic-drop-in-prices-across-asia

 

 

See link for photos.
 

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4 hours ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

Signs of stockpiling were also spotted by the WJC investigators in Vietnam. In early 2016 investigators were "told by an ivory trader that due to the low price and the gloomy ivory market, a few Chinese ‘big bosses’, who can afford it, were stockpiling up the ivory and not selling out, in order to reduce the supply and push up the price".

There is also no sign of a corresponding decline in poaching. "I see no decline," said Stiles. "That to me means a drop in price is actually bad for elephants. Because these guys can buy more ivory for the same amount of money as before.

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

Once again, “the big bosses”...coupled with “I see no decline”.

 

Big, big sigh...

 

Tom K.

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Posted (edited)

So radio collars can listen into gunfire ,report on the location immediately and gun silencers are no longer effective 

 

this is a great development

 

it is to be tested by save the elephants in northern Kenya, they hope that the batteries will last 1 year

 

Sensor detects shooting at elephants, helps authorities catch poachers

 

Kenyan elephants will get more protection from poachers thanks to new Vanderbilt University technology embedded in their tracking collars -- ballistic shockwave sensors that send coordinates to authorities immediately after detecting gunshots.

The new system is the first use of shockwave detection technology in the intensified push to thwart illegal trafficking and save endangered African elephants.

Dubbed WIPER, the project is a joint effort between Vanderbilt computer engineering faculty and Colorado State University, which has used GPS in tracking collars for years to study and protect elephants, slaughtered by the thousands for their ivory tusks.

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223329.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Fendangered_animals+(Endangered+Animals+News+--+ScienceDaily)

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

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Posted (edited)

Quote

 

African Task Force Snares Syndicate Trafficking Ivory to Asia
Juergen T. Steinmetz, eTurbo News
June 10, 2017


In a landmark operation, a cross-border African task force has arrested 7 key players that smuggled 1 ton of elephant tusks from Uganda to Singapore via Kenya in one instance alone, and who are part of a syndicate responsible for the ongoing decimation of Africa’s elephants for the ivory trade, as well as other endangered species whose body parts are still being smuggled in large quantities to Asia’s black markets.

The Lusaka Agreement Task Force (LATF) announced today that they have just concluded coordinating an intensive six-week operation resulting in multiple arrests, including a senior Kenyan Customs official, several shipping agents, and high-level traffickers for their role in smuggling the illegal consignment to Singapore in March 2014. The accused are also under investigation for other wildlife crimes.

The operation revealed evidence that links to other parts of Africa and Asia

 

STORY CONTINUES 

 

 

https://www.eturbonews.com/156987/african-task-force-snares-syndicate-trafficking-ivory-asia

 

great to see the crackdown , it is very concerning to see this trade continuing

 

the common estimate is that seizures only represent 10% of the trade

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

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29 minutes ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

So radio collars can listen into gunfire ,report on the location immediately and gun silencers are no longer effective 

 

this is a great development

 

it is to be tested by save the elephants in northern Kenya, they hope that the batteries will last 1 year

 

Sensor detects shooting at elephants, helps authorities catch poachers

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

A full link was posted on Sunday.

 

Tom K.

 

 

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Elephant live sales are spreading from Zimbabwe to Namibia

 

well it is going to be hot in the UAE and  they are being separated from their family 

 

CITES criteria met in elephant sale (Namibia)

Ellanie Smit, Namibian Sun

June 5, 2017

 

See link for photo. 

The Ministry of Environment and Tourism has dismissed allegations and reports insinuating that the export of five baby elephants from Namibia to a zoo in Dubai do not met the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species on Fauna and Flora (CITES) criteria.

Namibian Sun recently reported that Namibia is planning to sell five baby elephants to a zoo in Dubai after a permit for export was issued.

REPORT CONTINUES 

.

https://www.namibiansun.com/news/cites-criteria-met-in-elephant-sale/

-------------------------------------

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6 minutes ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

Elephant live sales are spreading from Zimbabwe to Namibia

 

well it is going to be hot in the UAE and  they are being separated from their family 

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

What's the primary issue?

 

Selling elephants born in the wild to overseas zoos?

 

Or, selling elephants born in the wild to zoos in locations with very high average temperatures?

 

In other words, would the issue be just as troublesome if the elephants were sold to a zoo in say, St. Louis?

 

Tom K.

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  • For an additional report please see

World outrage at planned export of baby elephants from Namibia  http://www.sabreakingnews.co.za/2017/06/12/world-outrage-at-planned-export-of-baby-elephants-from-namibia/

 

  • the permits are granted by the Namibian authorities , the same ones who cannot control poaching  ,where corruption is  rampant, the courts  ineffective,
  • there is no up to date ele numbers for Namibia they refused to take part in the Great Elephant Census at no cost in order to support an ivory trade bid
  • it is a commercial operation in a hot location concerned mainly with money and not animal  welfare
  • for humane society concerns please  see http://www.hsi.org/news/press_releases/2017/06/namibia-african-elephants-dubai-safari-club-061217-1.html
  • in the case of the Zimbabwe sales to china,some of the elephants died in transit
  • it is best for the elephants to live in a wild herd
  • there are reports that they will be available for riding , a cruel practice
  • they are being sent to a region which does not have a culture of respecting animal welfare

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3 minutes ago, COSMIC RHINO said:
  • in the case of the Zimbabwe sales to china,some of the elephants died in transit
  • it is best for the elephants to live in a wild herd
  • there are reports that they will be available for riding , a cruel practice
  • they are being sent to a region which does not have a culture of respecting animal welfare

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

Thank you for summarizing the widely known background realities.

 

Concerning the final point, about “a region which does not have a culture of respecting animal welfare”, what organization would make such a determination?

 

If one culture has one perspective, which differs from the viewpoints of other cultures, who might serve as the neutral party to arbitrate such concerns?

 

In order to be effective, what sort of common ground might exist between different global cultures to work through such concerns about sales of wild elephants?

 

Your insight and analysis would help me to better understand, given your long awareness of these issues.

 

Tom K.

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Quote

 

in practice it is difficult to  resolve differences

 

peace, justice and respect  is great  but not everyone is going to go along with it

 

some just believe in the market, principles are expensive and they don't care what anyone else thinks of them

 

the response is to deny any concern and go on doing whatever they want to

 

it took many years of carefull efforts to eliminate  the Yeman trade in rhino horn dagger handels

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~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

Thank you for your thoughtful comment above.

 

I appreciate your mention of the rhino dagger handles.

 

Sales of wild elephants may continue until there's a strong incentive not to do so, influencing either buyers or sellers.

 

Forbearance, persistence and patience are most effective when blended with stronger than average listening skills which show genuine mutual respect.

 

Tom K.

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Posted (edited)

South Africa: Suspected Rhino Poachers Nabbed in SA
The Herald

June 14, 2017

 

 

http://allafrica.com/stories/201706140775.html

 

  •  a low level but important arrest
  • impounded 13 rhino horns,3 elephant tusks plus weapons operating in the Hoedspruit area
Edited by COSMIC RHINO
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This sounds all well and good, but the illegal wildlife trade is serious business in Namibia .  if someone moves out of it,they wil just be replaced by someone else .

 

looks like all the reports from oxpecekers.org has created a desire to be seen to be doing something, even if it is unlikely to be successful

Namibia to Banish Wildlife Traffickers
Albertina Nakale, New Era

June 13, 2017

Windhoek: The newly signed Nature Conservation Amendment Act will empower the Ministry of Home Affairs and Immigration to ban entry into Namibia of foreign nationals involved in wildlife crimes related to the possession and dealing in elephant and rhino products, after they serve their prison terms.


Story continues  http://allafrica.com/stories/201706130821.html

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1 hour ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

looks like all the reports from oxpecekers.org has created a desire to be seen to be doing something, even if it is unlikely to be successful

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

What's the reason for speculating that “it is unlikely to be successful”?

 

Is there specific evidence suggesting that?

 

Tom K.

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Posted (edited)

Quote

 

this latest  move is in response to  a TRAFFIC  workshop 

 

Windhoek, Namibia, and Harare, Zimbabwe, 12th June 2017—Ministerial level workshops raising awareness against wildlife trafficking amongst Chinese nationals living and working in Namibia and Zimbabwe were jointly hosted by China’s State Forest Administration, China’s CITES[1] Management Authority, TRAFFIC and WWF last weekend, supported by the respective Chinese Embassies.

More than 160 local Chinese nationals from State-owned enterprises, private businesses and residential communities attended the workshops held in Windhoek and Harare respectively. Local NGOs and both local and international media were also present. Tommy Nambahu, Namibia’s Vice Minister of Environment and Tourism and Mandoga, Zimbabwe’s Director of Environment and Natural Resources Department, Ministry of Environment, Water and Climate made the opening remarks at the respective workshops.

 

report continues 

 

http://www.traffic.org/home/2017/6/12/china-joins-namibia-and-zimbabwe-in-efforts-to-curb-illegal.html?printerFriendly=true

 

it would have been difficult to decline to take action

 

Namibia is in a big mess , the courts  and wildlife  service do not operate well, it is very corrupt 

 

it looks like to me that they are doing something for the sake of saying that  they are acting , it is a distraction from the real business of  an out of control illegal wildlife trade

 

if they were serious they would have a proper luggage scanner at the airport instead of the overpriced one which does not work

Edited by COSMIC RHINO

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26 minutes ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

Namibia is in a big mess , the courts  and wildlife  service do not operate well, it is very corrupt 

 

it looks like to me that they are doing something for the sake of saying that  they are acting , it is a distraction from the real business of  an out of control illegal wildlife trade

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

Whoa!

 

That's a very serious charge to place against a nation.

 

What is the specific documented basis for tossing out such a comment?

 

For anyone considering a visit to Namibia, reading a such broad, general assertion would be startling.

 

Recent Namibia trip reports posted in Safaritalk have been largely positive about various aspects of the country.

 

What specific responsible reports from reliable sources support such a strongly negative opinion?

 

Tom K.

 

 

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the reports at http://oxpeckers.org/ go to Namibia poaching links are very detailed and one of them was given a special award for environmental journalism

 

a whole lot of individual cases are detailed

 

You can begin with  

 

02 Dec 2016 The horn scam at Windhoek’s airport

The Namibian authorities don’t seem to be in any hurry to shut down a rhino horn smuggling syndicate that has infiltrated security at Windhoek’s airport, writes John Grobler

http://oxpeckers.org/2016/12/the-horn-scam-at-windhoeks-airport/

 

the security at Etosha national park was effective  when it was done by the police and army,it  declined  when new rangers with a background in the ruling SWAPO political party were brought in, the suspected poachers have the same background

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15 minutes ago, COSMIC RHINO said:

the reports at http://oxpeckers.org/ go to Namibia poaching links are very detailed and one of them was given a special award for environmental journalism

 

a whole lot of individual cases are detailed

 

You can begin with  

 

02 Dec 2016 The horn scam at Windhoek’s airport

The Namibian authorities don’t seem to be in any hurry to shut down a rhino horn smuggling syndicate that has infiltrated security at Windhoek’s airport, writes John Grobler

http://oxpeckers.org/2016/12/the-horn-scam-at-windhoeks-airport/

 

the security at Etosha national park was effective  when it was done by the police and army,it  declined  when new rangers with a background in the ruling SWAPO political party were brought in, the suspected poachers have the same background

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

The existence of poaching in Namibia may be the case. Thank you for the link.

 

However, I'm uncomfortable with broad, general assertions like “Namibia is in a big mess” or “it is very corrupt”.

 

Isn't it enough to post facts about individual incidents for others to read and make their own judgments, rather than tarring the reputation of an entire nation with such vague, negative generalities?

 

Your vigilance in finding stories about wildlife enforcement is admirable, but it might be more comfortable and fair to step back away from very broad, general accusations about Namibia.

 

Like any nation, there are challenging aspects, but as recent trip reports from @Peter Connan and @xelas have persuasively shown, Namibia isn't “a mess” but rather has positive aspects.

 

Thank you for your understanding.

 

Tom K.

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this does not look good

 

Elephant-back riding awaits baby elephants at Dubai zoo

Africa Geographic

June 14, 2017

 

See link for video & photos.


According to a YouTube video hosted by Show Me Dubai, the five wild baby elephants recently captured on a Namibian game reserve and heading for a new Dubai zoo, Dubai Safari Park, will be subjected to elephant-back riding.

 

https://africageographic.com/blog/elephant-back-riding-baby-elephants-dubai-zoo/

 

-------------------------------------

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Wildlife Traffickers Exploiting Airlines Worldwide

C4ADS

May 2017


New Report Finds Widespread Wildlife Trafficking at Airports Across 114 Countries

A new analysis of global airport wildlife seizure and trafficking data reveals that wildlife traffickers around the world are heavily exploiting the air transport sector to smuggle protected and endangered animals and animal products on commercial flights.

The report, “Flying Under the Radar: Wildlife Trafficking in the Air Transport Sector,” produced by C4ADS as part of the USAID Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species (ROUTES) Partnership, analyzes airport seizures of ivory, rhino horn, birds and reptiles from January 2009 to August 2016. Collectively, these four categories account for about 66 percent of all trafficked wildlife, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and serve as indicators for wider trends within illicit wildlife trafficking.



please see http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/157301/27569977/1495443879600/Flying+Under+the+Radar-FINAL-lo.pdf?token=d%2FiL0momUAPpMpAgwzdir%2BkTGsY%3D      for the report 

 

this is very interesting 

 

some items are sent as hand luggage, excess flight luggage  and abandoned luggage ( try to collect it well after the flight has landed ) as the traders think that the risks of getting caught are less

 

in one case someone checked in with 6 suitcase, something  which raises  my suspicions what is in them when nearly everyone travels with only 1 or 2 suitcases

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