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Desert warthog video from Samburu National Reserve, central Kenya

Desert warthog Somali warthog Phacochoerus aethiopicus Samburu National Reserve Kenya

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#1 WildSolutions

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Posted 02 November 2015 - 06:31 AM

In mid-October (2015), good numbers of desert warthogs (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) were encountered on patches of short green grass near the Ewaso Nyiro River in Samburu National Reserve, central Kenya. This short video below shows a solitary female (being ‘groomed’ by a red-billed oxpecker Buphagus erythrorhynchus), a bachelor sounder of six adult males, a sounder of two females with a young male and six piglets, and a female with piglets. ​Click here for the video: http://www.wildsolut...tional-reserve/

 

Additional images of desert warthogs can be viewed at: http://www.wildsolut...raphy/photomap/

 

 

If you have any desert warthog records to share with us, please go to:

http://safaritalk.ne...horn-of-africa/

 

 

 

Thank you!

Yvonne de Jong & Tom Butynski, wildsolutions.nl


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#2 WildSolutions

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Posted 02 November 2015 - 09:34 AM

De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (25)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (22)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (19)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (12)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (11)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (6)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (3)
 
De Jong & Butynski   desert warthog   Samburu NR (2)

 

 

 


Edited by WildSolutions, 02 November 2015 - 09:36 AM.

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#3 Anomalure

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 12:42 AM

@WildSolutions

 

I saw Desert Warthogs at Ishaqbini (E of the Tana River, near Tana River Primate Reserve) in Jul 2014. I probably saw more than a dozen animals (saw the drooping warts very well on a few), but only got the 1 mediocre picture below.

 

img_5368.jpg


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#4 SafariChick

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 03:04 AM

@WildSolutions lovely to see such young piglets and the nursing! These warthogs seem very relaxed compared to common warthogs, which are the only kind I have seen, I don't know if there is any difference in demeanor between desert warthogs and common or whether these are simply habituated to your presence?


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#5 Tom Kellie

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 03:43 AM

@WildSolutions lovely to see such young piglets and the nursing! These warthogs seem very relaxed compared to common warthogs, which are the only kind I have seen, I don't know if there is any difference in demeanor between desert warthogs and common or whether these are simply habituated to your presence?

 

~ @SafariChick

 

You've expressed what I felt but had failed to put into words.

 

They do indeed seem easygoing.

 

When in Samburu and Meru I've observed warthogs at close range which acted fairly laidback and did look different than those I've seen elsewhere.

 

Lacking sufficient experience, I hesitated to identify them as being desert warthogs, yet now I wonder.

 

Glad you asked @WildSolutions about this.

 

Tom K.



#6 WildSolutions

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 02:05 PM

Thank you for sharing the image from Ishaqbini @Anomalure. We have records from the area in our WarthogBase but i will add yours if that is OK? 



#7 WildSolutions

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 03:43 PM

Dear @SafariChick and @Tom Kellie, thank you for your kind response! As far as we can tell now, desert warthogs are not more relaxed around people then common warthogs are....but there is a lot to learn about them so we keep our eyes open of course. In areas warthogs are not hunted both species can get habituated to the presence of vehicles etc. We have seen both taxa very wary of people in areas we believe they are hunted (north and western Kenya particularly).

 

 As you probably know, common and desert warthogs are sympatric in both Samburu and Meru. It is possible that you saw both species during those trips Tom!  

 

Best, Yvonne​


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#8 Anomalure

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Posted 08 November 2015 - 09:14 PM

@WildSolutions

 

Please feel free to add my image to the WarthogBase.


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#9 Tom Kellie

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Posted 11 November 2015 - 05:00 AM

Dear @SafariChick and @Tom Kellie, thank you for your kind response! As far as we can tell now, desert warthogs are not more relaxed around people then common warthogs are....but there is a lot to learn about them so we keep our eyes open of course. In areas warthogs are not hunted both species can get habituated to the presence of vehicles etc. We have seen both taxa very wary of people in areas we believe they are hunted (north and western Kenya particularly).

 

As you probably know, common and desert warthogs are sympatric in both Samburu and Meru. It is possible that you saw both species during those trips Tom!  

 

~ @WildSolutions

 

Your requests and posts are certainly timely and thought-provoking.

 

As it happens, one of the primary riddles during my Kenya safaris has been warthog identification in both Meru and Samburu.

 

Both in the field during game drives — my guide, Anthony Gitau, tends to take me to more remote corners — and back home in Beijing, looking over safari photographs, there's been a sense that I might be observing two different species.

 

That feeling is based on looking at tusk curvature, bristle distribution, and general demeanor.

 

I've wished that I could have advanced specialist field training in warthog identification in order to distinguish the species, especially as I'm especially fond of visiting both Meru and Samburu.

 

It's a priority on my to-do list to scrutinize numerous warthog photos with field guides open, in an attempt to train my eye to key visual distinguishing characteristics.

 

Your work is highly appreciated, as it involves an under-appreciated yet richly deserving species.

 

With Thanks,

 

Tom K.


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#10 WildSolutions

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 07:50 AM

Thank you very much Tom! I am happy to help to identify them! :)


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Desert warthog, Somali warthog, Phacochoerus aethiopicus, Samburu National Reserve, Kenya


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