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Tanzania lost 60% of there elephants in just 3 years.


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#1 Daudi Simba

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 03:17 PM

Tanzania’s elephant population is one of the continent’s largest. But data, released on Monday by the Tanzanian government, showed that between 2009 and 2014 the number dropped from 109,051 to 43,330. When an annual birth rate of 5% is taken into account the number of dead is 85,181. This is very frustating.



#2 Anthilltiger

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 07:51 AM

Depressing and sad this story and nothing is being done about it. Last December we did not see a SINGLE elephant in 3 days in Selous. Granted the game moves off the river that time of the year but not to see one was a shock. Haven't been to Ruhaha for a long time but all reports are Selous and Ruhaha have taken a massive hit. On a positive note, each time we visit the Serengeti, the elephants appear to be increasing.


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#3 Earthian

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 08:47 AM

@Daudi Simba

@Anthilltiger

 

see this:

http://www.eturbonew...-ivory-tanzania


Lives of great men all remind us
   We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
   Footprints on the sands of time.
  

#4 Tom Kellie

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 09:18 AM

Depressing and sad this story and nothing is being done about it. Last December we did not see a SINGLE elephant in 3 days in Selous. Granted the game moves off the river that time of the year but not to see one was a shock. Haven't been to Ruhaha for a long time but all reports are Selous and Ruhaha have taken a massive hit. On a positive note, each time we visit the Serengeti, the elephants appear to be increasing.

 

~ @Anthilltiger

 

Really ?!?!?! No elephants in three days?

 

That's terrible!

 

Those who connive to smuggle in ivory remain capable of evading weak barriers.

 

http://safaritalk.ne...ivory/?p=171483

 

There needs to be less joyous relief at hearing empty promises tossed out at media photo opportunities and far more rigorous inspection and enforcement at all points along the ugly underground route whereby illegal wildlife parts are smuggled, marketed and sold.

 

What you've written about seeing no elephants for three days somehow pierces my heart. That shouldn't be happening...and yet it is.

 

The unabated demand from end consumers is fueling the entire vile trade.

 

It's very helpful to know this sad reality. Thank you for telling us.

 

Tom K.



#5 optig

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 04:41 PM

http://allafrica.com...1612130415.html

 

As we all know Ruaha,Mahale, Katavi and Selous remain  some of the finest game viewing areas in Africa. Mikumi, Undzungwa Mountain National park and Gombe also have considerable potential as tourist destinations. I'm happy that the current Tanzanian government wants to develop their infrastucture. As we all know  too well, less than 10% of Selous is dedicated to safari tourism. Ruaha is bounded by two huge concessions; Kisingo and Rungwa. There is also Ugalla,As we know very well despite all their claims about removing gin traps and dedicating major resources to conservation, the hunters have done precious little to stop the decline of the elephant population in the Ruaha ecosystem as well as Selous National Game Preserve. In fact they allowed the black rhino to go instinct in Selous,and refused to take any responsibility. I will to say however, one hunter did admit to me that certain hunting operators  were unethical and that corruption was responsible for poaching in Selous and Ruaha. It's very interesting that elephant populations have either been stable or even grown in other areas. 

 

I sincerely hope that the Tanzanian government will follow the approach of Botswana's government and gradually convert these game rich areas into tourist areas. I know that it isn't easy and of course not hunting areas are scenically beautiful enough to appeal to tourists. I do know that it's far better for a country's image. I can tell you from long experience that Kenyans not only don't want big game hunting in their country,they are proud of the fact that they don't have it. They feel that there are other ways to deal with the problem of animal and human coexistence which has been going on since time immemorial.

 

It's obvious to me that the overwhelming majority of Botswanans support their country's decision to ban big game hunting. After all it's their country and Africans don't hunt for trophies.



#6 optig

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 10:07 AM

http://allafrica.com...1612160165.html

 

Yet again more positive news  in the Tanzanian government's war on poaching. There is no doubt that improved training will enable the Tanzanian wildlife service to arrest more poachers. 







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