Game Warden

Hwange National Park. PRESS RELEASE - Beks Ndlovu talks in his personal capacity on the killing of Cecil - a wildlife icon.

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cecil.jpg


Beks Ndlovu of www.africanbushcamps.com writes the following in relation to the recent trophy hunt of Cecil, a well known and popular Hwange National Park lion:

Following the recent killing by hunters of the well known lion, Cecil, just outside the boundary of Hwange National Park, we can confirm that this is now under the full investigation of Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Authority and the Industry at large. A meeting has been called for all stakeholders including the Zimbabwe Professional Hunters and Guides Association, Safari Operators Association Zimbabwe and National Parks to discuss the incident and find a resolution. The Tourism Operators in Hwange National Park, as well as the majority of the Zimbabwean population, are extremely passionate about the wildlife that we have worked hard to protect and continue to do so to ensure the long term conservation of not only our National Parks but their surrounding vulnerable wilderness areas.

In my personal capacity as CEO of the African Bush Camps group of companies I strongly object and vehemently disagree with the legalising and practice of hunting lions in any given area. I will personally be encouraging Zimbabwe National Parks and engaging with Government Officials to STOP THE KILLING of LIONS and with immediate effect.


(Text and image courtesy and copyright Beks Ndlovu / African Bush Camps.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzMpVsv1PtU

Youtube user Jayne Leach who uploaded the above video writes:

I had the privilege of tracking and watching this majestic Lion in Hwange Park Zimbabwe last year... he is one of only two Lions left in this area, looking after several Lioness and their cubs...

Today he has been shot by a Trophy hunter... sickened to the core.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4a2htZ2wIQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUdD2WndUSw&

Youtube user Bryan Orford who uploaded the videos writes:

Sadly Cecil the lion shown here, has just been shot by Gwaai hunters. He was the most famous lion in the south east of Hwange, Zimbabwe and the biggest tourist attraction. Not only a natural loss, but a financial loss. Put in perspective a good lion hunt in the Gwaai might cost US$45,000. However the lions shot are born, bred and fed in a photographic area, and the Gwaai as a hunting area is not really sustainable without the nearby photographic areas, and relies on overflows. One lodge near where this clip was taken (Linkwasha) can take 14 guests a night, paying between US$550 and $920 a day, depending on the season. This lion was viewed on a daily basis by 4 lodges. But just taking this one lodge alone and an average of US$700 a day, and a full camp, we would have US$9,800 a day. So in 5 days he would have made more having his photograph taken, with one lodge, than being shot by someone clueless of how easy he was to shoot. You can see from this clip that shooting him does not require much skill or courage.


Here's what I've leant about Cecil through talking with various people:

 

Cecil was a pride male of the Linkwasha area of Hwange National Park for about 5 years before he was finally chased out by 2 large male lions, (Bush and Bubezi), about 3 and a half years ago. Cecil fled and then managed to join up with another ousted male lion called Jericho and together formed a new coalition. They had 2 prides. The one pride consisted of 3 lioness with seven, 7 month old cubs. The second pride consisted of 3 females, one of which has young cubs and the other 2 are all expected to be pregnant. These two small prides are about to be subject to the wrath of a new male soon. Cecil was about 12 years old when he was shot and Jerico is about 11 years old. About a month ago Bush was shot and 2 new males have already arrived and chased Bubezi out. Most of their pride have fled from the two new males as they now know that their cubs are vulnerable to infanticide. Some have left the park and entered a communual land area where they could be hunted.

 

A statement from the Zimbabwe Professional Hunters and Guides Association, (Facebook page here), reads:

 

Cecil the Hwange Lion.

 

It is with regret that we have to inform the public that Cecil the Lion, an Iconic figure to the Photographic sector, lodges in Hwange, guides in Hwange and general public that have met him in the past 13 years in Hwange was recently killed outside the park on private land on a safari. One of the PH's on the Hunting permit is a member of ZPHGA. There is an investigation ongoing at this time. We are awaiting all relevant documentation for verification. Until such time as the investigation is complete we ask that members and non members, refrain from speculating until all facts have been documented. This is both on the legal aspect and the ethical aspect. We do not know all the facts yet.

 

Chairman ZPHGA

 

It's believed at the time Cecil was hunted he was wearing a collar.

 

Having followed this story, I've spoken with various sources in Zimbabwe and at present, with the ongoing investigation, due to legal implications I feel it's best not to speculate to the facts, legality of the hunt, who the hunter and hunting operator was etc., but suffice to say as and when these details are reported as fact I'll follow up on this topic.

 

Some of the questions that this incident raises for me, (and has done in prior similar occasions), are those such as:

  • what is the purpose of collaring a specific animal?
  • should a collared animal be exempted from a trophy hunt if it crosses into a hunting concession?
  • can and should collaring be used to protect specific animals?
  • how ethical is it to trophy hunt a collared animal?
  • what is the level of interaction between between photographic and trophy hunting sectors - should there be a greater co-ordination between both in regards to specific animals?
  • Just how will this affect pride dynamics now in the National Park area from which the lion came?
  • How will this incident alone, (or when taken into consideration with the spotlight on trophy hunting and declining lion populations), affect the future of trophy hunting in Zimbabwe?
  • What do the hunting concessions of the Gwai Valley area contribute, financially or otherwise to conservation aims, other than acting as a buffer zone, if their quotas can include wildlife which crosses into them from Hwange National Park.
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Bryan Orford, Zimbabwe Professional Guide has shared his thoughts with me on how the Gwai Valley could be incorporated into Hwange National Park, or gazetted as a new one:

Why the Gwai Valley should become a National Park

 

Cecil pictured here, was recently killed by hunters, and is one many well known Hwange lions who have fallen victim. These lions are born, bred and fed in the Hwange National park, but shot by hunters who did nothing to contribute to this. The Gwai valley bordering Hwange Park has a mixture of shooting farms that were given to people that are normally absent and some underutilised Forestry areas. These farmers allow the extermination of most of the wild animals on the farms, and this by illegal hunting and legally by Zimbabwe hunters, with questionable ethics and morals. When a lion comes across the railway border he is likely to be shot on a ‘line’ hunt, ie hunters patrolling railway lines and boundaries. Here hunters target lions and other animals from the more populous photographic areas of the National park. The hunters rely on overflows as they have exploited their own areas, having little left to shoot. The animals that stray across from the park, are generally used to people and cars and as can be seen from this pic, they are very trusting, and easy hunting. The hunting industry will often deceive their clients into believing they are ‘heroic’, ‘good shots’, that they have tricked the lion, the money they are spending is mostly for conservation, and that they are helping conservation by killing etc. This feel good marketing strategy, boosts the clients ego, and encourages him to part with his money to kill. 'Line' hunting along park boundaries is worse than canned lion hunting. This killing of pride lion males from Hwange National Park causes serious disruptions to the lion population in the park and does serious damage to Zimbabwe’s tourism, which is more lucrative than hunting for the country. The Gwai valley has in recent years been a spring board for rhino poachers, illegal hunters, game extermination, and lawlessness. To ever reintroduce rhino to Hwange we will need to turn the Forestry commission areas and the shooting blocks adjoining the park into safer areas ie National parks land. This is in the best interests of tourism, the wildlife population, a future rhino population, the economy, job creation, and the stability of the animals in the adjoining Hwange National park. Hwange National Park should be extended to include the Gwai Valley.

It would not take much. The Gwai would need lodges to be fixed up, some areas could be used a public areas and others as private concessions. The game would increase, but could be helped a bit. The location is brilliant because of the main road. There will also be eventually the Gwai Shangani dam, which would be great with elephants and hippos etc.

The Forestry commission was under the same control up to about the 1950's in fact parks was part of forestry. They split as it was thought a forestry commission was necessary to do logging of teak forests. This now is no longer a need. This job could be done without Forestry holding land. It could just be amalgamated again.

Forestry in western zim does very little and their lodges and hunting could be handled better by the private sector: the Gwai Valley can be carved up into private concessions that would make loads of money, and public areas that people can access via the main road, with camps like Main camp. There are already some camps that have fallen by the wayside since the land invasions, that could be revamped.

 

The Gwai valley has nice scenery, some good vleis, and the gwaai river which historically was the destination of much game over a century ago, because of the water. With the Gwai Shangani dam, you could end up with something stunning in future, almost like a mini Kariba.

 

Before the land invasions the white farmers had already largely moved away from cattle. Many had turned to hunting, but just before the land invasions many were turning their areas into photographic. Forestry was also following and there is still Sikumi, Sable etc. However forestry was very affected by the land invasions as well and some of the forestry lodges closed down. But the Gwai Conservancy had been formed and was heading in the photographic eco tourism direction.

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Posted (edited)

same old stuff. Lack of ethics in the hunters's community. Nothing new. There was significant overhunting of male lions (and young lions less than 4yrs old) less than 10 years ago in Hwange (see the study of Dr Loveridge). Those hunters probably consider themselves as conservationists. Bad news for WS that invested a lot in that part of Hwange.

Edited by Dam2810
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at least for once those hunters could not be accused of shooting a lion less than 6 years old...

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I see a lot of parallels with wolves in Yellowstone national park. An alpha female strayed outside the park and was shot.completely altered the pack dynamics. Yes takeovers happen in packs and prides but human intervention artificially increases the frequency and has dire consequences for many more individuals than the lone animal that was shot. :(

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Have you seen Cecil in the past during your visit to Hwange National Park? If so feel free to share you photos in this topic and where you saw him.

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Posted (edited)

Some of the questions that this incident raises for me, (and has done in prior similar occasions), are those such as:

  • what is the purpose of collaring a specific animal?

It seems you assume a specific animal was collared, this might the case, this might not be the case. But let's assume he wasn't specifically collared, he was just one of several male lions collared in a study.

Why you collar animals, and which animals you target depends on the questions you have or the issues you try to address. A radio-tracking collar enables you to reliably and regularly find the animal, a gps collars gives you insight in fine-scale movements of the animal. Is the question centered around social structure and how often animals are in close proximity to each then you'll have to collar several or all members in a group. Is the question about where the group roams then one individual in a social group like a lion pride or lion coalition is often enough. Question which could be thought of are: Do homeranges shift and alter per season? How much do male coalition and female pride homeranges overlap? Do homeranges shift due to baiting? Do homeranges shift after removal of neighboring animals (through hunting outside the park for example).

  • should a collared animal be exempted from a trophy hunt if it crosses into a hunting concession?

Again, it depends on the question you try to answer. If you're interested in assessing causes of mortality then it shouldn't be illegal to shoot a collared animal as that would bias your results. You hope hunters would be indifferent to the presence of a collar. Causes of death are some of the hardest things to assess in apex predators like lions as they usually just vanish and you have very little chance of finding the carcass fresh enough to assess what has happened if the animal wasn't wearing a collar. If you're studying other aspects of lion life you should either select an area where there is no lion hunting, or a country in which the hunting of collared animals is illegal, or make very good agreements with the hunters in the area you work in.

  • can and should collaring be used to protect specific animals?

The short answer would be 'yes' and 'yes'. But there is a difference. Collaring a single wild dog in a pack increases the chance of removing a snare from any pack member dramatically, the same counts for lions. Dr. Flip Stander often uses the collars to mitigate potential human wildlife conflicts.

Should they protect the animal? The more you know about a species, the better you can manage/protect it. All collaring should be done with the aim to increase the knowledge about a species. No knowledge leads to indifference, no understanding which often leads to the demise of a species. Even if you work in an area where the shooting of collared animals is legal, you might loose animals to that, but that enables you to better quantify the causes of death, thus losing some collared animals to hunting now, will contribute to their management in the future as it enables you to assess if the off-take by hunting is sustainable. So they can contribute immediately to the protection of specific animals, and they should contribute to the protection of the species in the future. If you really narrow the question down to specific animals, than I think only animals of threatened species (or in areas where they are threatened) and where threat levels can lowered (or survival chances increased) by collaring should collaring be used to protect specific animals.

 

I'll try to answer the questions I quoted.

Edited by egilio
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Now all those cubs are a question mark. Same old story .........

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Hunters must surely realise that they are doing themselves no favours at all when they do this kind of thing but I can’t say this surprises me. I’ve written many times in support of hunting as means of conserving habitat and wildlife in areas unsuited to photo tourism but I have to say when something like this happens it really makes it very difficult to keep defending hunting.

 

Since @@kittykat23uk brought up the example of Yellowstone I think the following examples from the US might possibly be relevant to some of your questions @@Game Warden

 

A few weeks ago there was a BBC Natural World documentary “Mountain Lions: Big Cats in High Places” following Panthera’s Dr Mark Elbroch and the Great Tetons Cougar Project this research project has revealed lots of interesting things but also a major problem for cougars. Since the reintroduction of wolves to the ecosystem the survival rate of mountain lion kittens has gone down which is only natural as carnivores often kill the young of competing species, the wolves are just doing what they have always done for thousands of years. The unfortunate problem is that this now means the population of these cats is no longer stable but in fact declining because of human hunting, quite simply with fewer kittens reaching adulthood the popular sport of hunting cougars is no longer sustainable. However the Wyoming Fish and Game Department derives a large part of its budget from the selling of hunting licences for these cats. If they reduce the quota or do what they probably should do and ban the hunting of cougars altogether they will not only lose a lot of money but seriously antagonise the hunters and give them another reason to dislike and want to get rid of wolves. However if they do nothing cougars could potentially disappear from the Tetons and this area of the Rockies altogether.

 

What's clear in this case with the cougars and also from another Natural World documentary “The Bear with Bounty on its Head” about the work of Dr Lynn Rogers a black bear researcher in Minnesota is that in America the fact that an animal is wearing a collar and is therefore obviously a research animal makes no difference to whether or not a hunter will shoot it. In the case of the bears Dr Rogers has controversially habituated the bears to the point where he can hand feed them and then put collars on them without the need to dart them. To try and protect them from hunters he ties coloured ribbons on to their collars so that it is impossible for a hunter not to see that the bear has a collar and is therefore a research animal but the bears are still shot. Perhaps if anything some hunters are even more likely to shoot a collared animal because they are afraid that if they don’t shoot collared animals then people will start putting collars on animals not for genuine research purposes but purely to stop them from being shot. Hunters are also not going to be keen to support scientific research if the end result is that the scientists go to the Fish and Game Department and insist that the quotas must be reduced or even that hunting needs to be banned. They don’t therefore care that shooting collared individuals is interfering with important scientific research and they are completely within the law to shoot such animals so technically they are not doing anything wrong.

 

Whether hunters in Africa have the same sort of attitude to animals wearing collars I don’t know but I wouldn’t be that surprised if they did. It would be quite easy to assume that most wildlife researchers are probably not keen supporters of trophy hunting whether that is actually the case or not so some hunters may well be suspicious of the motives of wildlife researchers. The hunter’s primary interest is in keeping their clients happy, doing their job and getting paid are they going to send their client home empty handed because the one lion or elephant that they want to shoot has a collar on it? I suspect not this incident is deplorable but as I say it doesn’t really surprise me.

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Posted (edited)

As someone who made a living as a professional hunter, to me the situation is quite simple. Unlike, say, with buffalo and

elephant,we don't know NEARLY enough about lion dynamics, and more importantly, lion numbers, to have even one single lion on hunting quota. Anywhere in Africa! Let's put meaningful pressure on the various Wildlife or Parks Departments through out this continent to halt lion hunting.

Edited by Pat Dewi
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@@Pat Dewi

In fact we do know much about lion dynamics.

They do live in a pride and Cecil was the one in charge of one if not more than one pride.

I suggest you see the movie "THE LAST LIONS" from Dereck Joubet & Beverly Joubert, there you can learn much baout lion dynamics.

The death of Cecil will have enormous repercussions on his pride, only time will show the extend of it.

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Posted (edited)

@@Game Warden,

I, proudly, stand by a dear friend, a guide per excellence, Beks Ndlovu.

The death of Cecil was totally uncalled for and yes, IF a lion crosses to a hunting concession and is collared he should NOT be shot dead. Period.

This will affect tremendously the pride dynamics in the Park. Fact.

Edited by Grilointoafrica

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I would be interested to know how it can be justified to have lion hunting allowed at all on the edges of what seems to be a successful national park. This kind of consequence is surely completely predictable and 1) Really sets back the cause of those who genuinely want to use hunting as a conservation tool; 2) Is effectively taking money out of the park and into the hunting concession so with dubious financial benefit - probably negative in this case but perhaps sometimes slightly positive if by luck they shoot the "right" lion - and negative conservwtion benefit; 3) is highly likely to create very bad feeling between the beneficiaries of the concession and those dependent on the park, with more negative consequences.

 

I'm not asking about the particular case, although knowing what happened and why might be enlightening. I'm thinking about the concept that when wildlife steps on someone's property it becomes their property to do with as they want as long as they can manage to avoid leaving proof that they broke any exisitng regulations, even though their action has significant negative consequences on the livelihoods of many others, and damages the park which the buffer zone was supposed to be protecting.

 

Maybe my question is too general to answer - but I'll ask it anyway. What do conservationists who support this kind of strategy say about it? Links to articles welcomed! I don't mind doing my own reading.

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Posted (edited)

A few years ago hunters together with scientists developed a definition of a 'huntable male lion' (it can be found here: http://www.accuratereloading.com/2012/dhl.pdf). This definition was also endorsed by the Dallas Safari Club, but not by Safari Club International. The definition claims the most important part is that the lion is 6 years or older. Another part of it reads: "To reduce risks of infanticide, males of any age known to be heading prides or known to be part of a coalition heading prides with dependent cubs (18 months old or less) should not be hunted".

This lion was well over 6 years old, but as far as I understand his coalition was still in control of a pride. He and his mate were holding tenure over 2 prides with cubs under 18 months old in both prides, so he was not meeting the definition of a huntable male lion. Of course, this definition has no legal value, but it put the ethics of this hunt, as defined by both scientists AND hunters, into perspective. Being such a prominent male it is hard to imagine the PH didn't know this male lion, and didn't know about the pride with cubs. Maybe the PH wasn't resident in the area, maybe communication between photographic lodges and hunting companies in the area wasn't very good, or maybe the PH didn't care about others utilizing the same area and animals, who all contribute to the conservation of the area and the animals in it.

 

edit: should have read the opening post a bit better.

Edited by egilio
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Posted (edited)

@@egilio, many lions shot are still less than 6 yrs old...

 

I do not understand how a hunter can shoot such an iconic lion that is the star attraction of quite a few lodges in that section of the park.

 

Edited. Matt.

Edited by Game Warden

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The introduction of age restrictions in Tanzania has led to substantial decrease in numbers of lions shot, and the introduction of the penalty system in Niassa (shooting lions to young could lead to a reduction of the quota in the subsequent year) has led to an increase in percentage of lions 6+ shot.

It's true that still quite a few lions under 6 are shot, but this mainly happens in countries where there are no such age restrictions with associated penalties. Aging lions in the field isn't that hard, at least not to distinguish if a lion is 4 or 6 or older. But 5 or 6 can be tricky, but if you're a conservationist you should err on the safe side, right?

In this case the lion was far past 6 years old, but still member of a coalition holding tenure over not one, but even two prides, both with cubs in them.

It could be very difficult to determine if a lion is associated with a pride with cubs nearby, but with such a prominent, well-known male, it's hard to believe people didn't know that.

In other areas, where hunters only have a presence for about 6 months a year, if you properly interpret this definition, and err on the safe side, if cubs are recorded at game trail cameras at baith, they should refrain from shooting any male lion in a circle of about 20 km around that bait.

 

I won't comment on speculations, time will tell the truth I hope.

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@@Dam2810 in case you did not read my first post in its entirety, I'll repeat this section:

 

at present, with the ongoing investigation, due to legal implications I feel it's best not to speculate to the facts, legality of the hunt, who the hunter and hunting operator was etc

Therefore I've edited a large part of your post: please respect my wishes in this matter - I'll will be keeping an eye on this topic and if necessary moderate posts if they go against what I've asked.

 

At the end of the day, if people follow social media they may well be aware of speculation about who the alleged hunter/operator was, and details about the hunt, but in this case, for the points I've quoted above, I'll ask members to refrain from posting it here on Safaritalk.

 

Thanks, Matt.

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Posted (edited)

@gamewarden, apologies. I respect your decision even if i do not share any sympathy for the hunting community. Anyway as you mention, the name of the PH is well known and all over the place on the web. Just need to go on the Zim NP page or on any hunting forum. I hope the great hunting community will for once be transparent and take the necessary measures. But I have doubts about it. That lion was already shot 2 weeks ago if I am correct...Hope it is not going to take ages to get a conclusion.

 

By the way the same happened with the Bumi Lion and the Musango Elephant Bull in Zimbabwe. Both had collars, both were on photographic land and both were unique animals...

 

http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2010/06/23/musango_elephant_shot_by_hunter/

 

http://safaritalk.net/topic/7460-the-last-male-lion-of-bumi-shot-by-hunters/

Edited by Dam2810
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@@Dam2810 Indeed, hence my wording,

 

Some of the questions that this incident raises for me, (and has done in prior similar occasions), are those such as:

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Posted (edited)

 

 

  • How will this incident alone, (or when taken into consideration with the spotlight on trophy hunting and declining lion populations), affect the future of trophy hunting in Zimbabwe?
  • What do the hunting concessions of the Gwai Valley area contribute, financially or otherwise to conservation aims, other than acting as a buffer zone, if their quotas can include wildlife which crosses into them from Hwange National Park.

 

Regarding the first question, it is not the first incident in Zimbabwe. It happened with the Bumi Lion and the Musango Elephant Bull. Nothing changed. I do not expect anything to happen to the great PH who led that hunt. I hope to be wrong but the ZPHGA will certainly conclude that the PH did nothing wrong. Once again they will protect one of them and hide the facts (what they have been doing so far in 2 weeks). Also hunters investigating a hunter...Do you honestly believe that it is in the interest of the ZPHGA to be open about the incident and to sanction the PH? The hunting community has never been very transparent and after similar incidents, I do not remember a single PH being sanctioned...As said by an hunter on accurate reloading, nothing will happen to the PH, he will only have to close his Facebook account and will be congratulated by many of them. Maybe he will even get the reward at the next SCI/DSC meeting for the biggest lion shot. A shame they do not have an award for ethical hunts.

 

 

Until such time as the investigation is complete we ask that members and non members, refrain from speculating until all facts have been documented. This is both on the legal aspect and the ethical aspect. We do not know all the facts yet.

Chairman ZPHGA

 

I am wondering how long they need. It happened more than 2 weeks ago. The carcass is gone, the client is probably back in the US.

 

 

Regarding the second question, for many specialists, the Gwai Valley is not really a buffer but more a vacuum cleaner? Is using bait next to a NP (in an area almost devoid of wildlife due to overhunting) to attract predators ethical...?

 

I would like PHs to explain me how that hunt is part of the conservation they always talk about. I try to be open winded and to believe that hunting is useful for conservation but after such incident, I find it difficult to support hunters and I understand why conservationists like the Jouberts hate them.

Edited by Dam2810
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If you look at the webpage of ZPHGA

 

http://zphga.org/

 

It is written "ETHICS ARE EVERYTHING!"...We will see the result of the investigation

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Posted (edited)

More news from the "local" newspaper about that hunt. ZPHGA confirmed the identity of the PH

 

http://bulawayo24.com/index-id-news-sc-regional-byo-71174.html

 

 

 

Cecil was wearing a collar when shot with bow and arrow

Alledgely, Cecil did not die immediately and it took a further two days to track him and kill him with a rifle.

The lion was skinned and his head removed as a trophy. There may have been an attempt to destroy the collar and hide it but it was later found.

Apparently there is no permitted quota to shoot lions in the Gwaai area but Zimbabwean hunters posting in online forums have insisted the hunt was legal.
Edited by Dam2810

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What happened to Cecil's skin & head? Is that known? @@Dam2810 - is there a publicly accessible place where the hunting quotas of the various GMAs and hunting concessions in Zim are listed for all to see? If the Gwaai hunt was indeed illegal, then shouldn't they take the trophy back from the hunter?

 

As for the ethics of this - it just does not matter to these so called professionals, clearly. You're 100% right - this is exactly what happened to the lone Bumi lion & the Musango ele. And that last female rhino in Namibian park. And the desert lions from Flip Sanders projects. And the big ele bull of Gonarezhou. And the lions of South Luangwa... I could go on endlessly like a broken record, but nobody wants to listen to this litany of names.

 

@@inyathi - I was glad to read that you thought that hunting Cecil was not defensible.. I wish more of the habitual supporters of hunting on ST would express that opinion. Because if this isn't flagrantly unethical, I don't know what is.

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I won't delve into the debate regarding hunting, not only because far more ST members have greater knowledge of the facts and figures supporting both sides of the argument, but primarily because my reaction since reading this simply leaves me too saddened to advocate at all. What a magnificent creature he was.

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Posted (edited)

@@Sangeeta, no idea what happened to the trophy, there are rumours circulating.

 

A Zim PH (Martin Pieters), member of ZPHGA (Zim Professional Hunters and Guides association) had the same "experience" a few years ago when he led the hunt of a well known collared elephant next to Matusanoda (the Musango elephant, see the hunting report below), after that incident he became the chairman of the ZPHGA (I do not think he was already the chairman when that happened) and according to his website he is still the chairman today. So I would not expect anything from the ZPHGA if they lead the investigation. I only hope that the Zim NP will go much further than ZPHGA and will not be influenced by those ethical hunters

 

http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/6321043/m/7871021431/p/1/xsl/print_topic

Edited by Dam2810
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