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Tom Kellie

Show us your flycatchers, chats, wheatears and shamas...

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African Dusky Flycatcher



Photographed at 7:17 am on 22 January, 2013 in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 200mm f/2.8L IS telephoto lens + EF 2x extender.



ISO 100, 1/400 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual Exposure.



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Once in a great while during a game drive a bird will unexpectedly pose very near the safari van, whether from curiosity or indifference I don't have any well-founded idea.



This Muscicapa adusta, African Dusky Flycatcher, was such a bird. When pushing the shutter I feared the clicking sound might cause it to fly off, but that wasn't at all the case.




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Posted (edited)

This topic for flycatchers, chats, wheatears and shamas definitely needs more variety so I am offering a Cedar Waxwing which belongs to a family of two members. The other waxwing, the Bohemian, stays further north in Canada most of the year and is plumper - better to deal with cold I figure. If you see one waxwing, you are likely surrounded by more - all calling in high-pitched, trilled whistles. They move in groups in the fall, scooping up the last of the berries.

 

 

 

This Cedar Waxwing was photographed on the side of Mt. Rainier in the State of Washington, USA, in August.

 

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Edited by Terry
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This topic for flycatchers, chats, wheatears and shamas definitely needs more variety so I am offering a Cedar Waxwing which belongs to a family of two members. The other waxwing, the Bohemian, stays further north in Canada most of the year and is plumper - better to deal with cold I figure. If you see one waxwing, you are likely surrounded by more - all calling in high-pitched, trilled whistles. They move in groups in the fall, scooping up the last of the berries.

 

This Cedar Waxwing was photographed on the side of Mt. Rainier in the State of Washington, USA, in August.

 

~ @@Terry

 

Thank you so much for this.

I grew up as a pre-teen making regular visits to Mt. Rainier National Park with my family.

My late mother had a special love for Cedar Waxwings.

Your lovely photograph, helpful commentary and enlivening of this thread is much appreciated.

Tom K.

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Copsychus saularis in Early February



Photographed at 11:44 am on 4 February, 2013 in the Hong Kong Wetland Park, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens



ISO 100, 1/400 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual Exposure



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One of the finest locations for photographing a variety of East Asian avian species is the Hong Kong Wetland Park. Arriving on a weekday morning, the atmosphere is calm and quiet with birds out and about.



This Copsychus saularis, Oriental Magpie-Robin, perched on the railing beside the extensive Nymphaea pond. It showed little apparent concern about the approach of a large, dark lens.



Although circumstances where I work and live limit my active participation in Safaritalk, this image is posted in happy memory of so many wonderful bird images posted by Safaritalk's many active bird photographers — @@kittykat23uk, @@Tdgraves, @@TonyQ, @@inyathi, @@Geoff, @@Peter Connan, @@mvecht, @@JohnR, @@Patty and @@offshorebirder.


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@@Tom Kellie Nice to see you posting again - such a lovely image.

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Thanks @@Tom Kellie - great photo of a lovely bird.

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Ah what a beauty!

 

Thanks Tom!

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@@Tom Kellie

A lovely photo of a beautiful bird. It is good that you can visit the Hong Kong Wetland

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Posted (edited)

When the early immigrants from Asia arrived in Hawaii, they brought their birds from home with them including the White-rumped Shama. This shama from Malaysia was introduced to the Island of Kaua'i in 1931. They are common in the lowland alien forests, but have now also penetrated into native forest found at higher elevations. Hearing them sing is delightful as they are regarded as one of the most gifted singer in all the islands.

 

I photographed White-rumped Shama on the northern shore of Kaua'i in June and found them in two varieties - wet and dry.

 

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Edited by Terry
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From Gonarezhou - May 2016

 

Mocking Cliff Chat

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Southern Black Flycatcher

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Arnott's Chat (m)

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Arnott's Chat (f)

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Posted (edited)

African Grey Flycatcher at 'Corner Baridi' (cold corner), along Magadi Road in the Ngong Hills south of Nairobi.

 

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Edited by offshorebirder
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The Great Kiskadee is large and blocky flycatcher which we have only seen close to water; either a cenote or an ocean shore will suit him. This one was photographed at low tide along the shore of Tankah Bay not far from Tulum, Mexico, doing his best at hunting for his dinner as a shorebird might. Looking down on him was a treat for it allowed us to see his yellow crest which rises to the occasion at times of alarm.

 

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