Jump to content




See all Safaritalk Special Offers

Message to Guests.

Welcome to Safaritalk where we have been talking Safaris and wildlife conservation since 2006. As a guest you're welcome to read through certain areas of the forum, but to access all the facilities and to contribute your experience, ask questions and get involved, you'll need to be a member - so register here: it's quick, free and easy and I look forward to having you as a Safaritalker soon. Matt.


Photo

Rwandan Akagera National Park lion reintroduction plan

Rwanda Lion Akagera African Parks

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#21 inyathi

inyathi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,918 posts
  • Local time: 03:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Category 1:Tourist (regular visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 01 July 2015 - 07:19 PM

A few of the original lions from Akagera almost certainly left the park after the civil war when Akagera was invaded by refugees and the northern section of the park was lost and migrated north to Lake Mburo NP in Uganda where there were no lions but sadly all of the lions in Lake Mburo have since been poisoned (or possibly speared) by the local people to protect their herds of Ankole cattle. At least I believe that is the case and don't think there are any lions left in Lake Mburo.

 

As I mentioned in my previous post the first black rhinos were introduced to Akagera in the 60s, Maasai giraffes were introduced to the park in 1986 and unlike the rhinos are still thriving. Why either species was absent from the park I don’t know, there are as far as I know giraffes in the Burigi Game Reserve in Northwestern Tanzania right on the border only about 12 miles or so southeast of Akagera’s boundary. In the past there were certainly also black rhinos in this part of Tanzania.

 

The East African black rhinos at Dvur Kralove originally came from Tsavo so it’s fitting that some of them have gone to Mkomazi. Considering that 10 rhinos from the Mara wondered across the border and set up home in the Serengeti it really is crazy that Kenya and Tanzania do not cooperate more over their rhinos. I hope that in the future things will change and they will at least be willing to exchange animals in order increase genetic diversity. Ideally all though of these rhinos would be managed as a single population including eventually those in Akagera and I hope one day some in Uganda as well but no doubt the Ugandans will struggle to obtain some Eastern blacks if KWS won’t part with any.

 

I may well at some point add something about the Zakouma rhinos to my report.  


Edited by inyathi, 01 July 2015 - 07:19 PM.

  • twaffle, wilddog, jeremie and 1 other like this

#22 SafariChick

SafariChick

    Order of the Pith

  • Members
  • 2,589 posts
  • Local time: 08:47 PM
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:California
  • Category 1:Tourist (first-time visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 03 July 2015 - 04:29 AM

Photos of the lions' translocation:  https://www.flickr.c...157652990410054

 

I especially like this one:

 

19332489295_060e37cef8_z.jpg


Edited by SafariChick, 03 July 2015 - 04:29 AM.

  • Irish Elk, inyathi, optig and 1 other like this

#23 SafariChick

SafariChick

    Order of the Pith

  • Members
  • 2,589 posts
  • Local time: 08:47 PM
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:California
  • Category 1:Tourist (first-time visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 03 July 2015 - 05:28 AM

Here is a video about the journey 

 

 

 

It says when they arrived, the lions seemed hungry and started looking around their boma trying to hunt. The rangers had killed a buffalo for them to eat.  

 

Also, update from @AkageraPark twitter account:  "The lions have eaten the meat provided & the females have begun to drink water. Males looking around curiously."


  • twaffle, Irish Elk, inyathi and 1 other like this

#24 egilio

egilio

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,533 posts
  • Local time: 04:47 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Conservationist/Naturalist
  • Category 2:Ecologist

Posted 29 July 2015 - 03:58 AM

And here the release: Press release

 

African Parks, in partnership with the Rwanda Development Board, has released seven translocated lions into Akagera National Park. The five females, from &Beyond Phinda Private Game Reserve, and two males, from Tembe Elephant Park, both in the South African province of KwaZulu Natal, were brought to Rwanda at the end of June in a ground breaking conservation effort for the country.

 

 

And a video about the translocation (with some unnecessary dramatic lion sounds):

 

 


  • Sangeeta and SafariChick like this

#25 Zubbie15

Zubbie15

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 411 posts
  • Local time: 11:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Tourist (first-time visitor)
  • Category 2:---

Posted 11 June 2016 - 11:44 AM

I didn't see this posted here anywhere - the lions have their first cubs. This story is linked to from the African Parks website (http://www.dailymail...s-fortunes.html) but from what I've seen on their website they have now seen 7 cubs.  


  • ZaminOz, inyathi and michael-ibk like this

#26 optig

optig

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,833 posts
  • Local time: 07:47 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Category 1:Resident in Africa/Former resident
  • Category 2:---

Posted 26 January 2017 - 02:21 PM

I can only say that i can't wait until I visit Akagera. I'm sure that Rwanda will now receive more tourists.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Rwanda, Lion, Akagera, African Parks


© 2006 - 2016 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.

Welcome guest to Safaritalk.
Please Register or Login to use the full facilities.