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jeremie

Jaguar poaching increase in South America

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Own of my travel agent (Nickadventure) in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, just posted on his Facebook page comments from locals about a jaguar poaching increase, especially in Northern Bolivia, corresponding to the Beni Wetlands and Amazonian Forest, south to Tambopata reserve in Peru.

 

I will quote his comments here:

 

 

Sadly after speaking to locals in the Bolivian Amazon Area Jaguars are now under attack !!, Chinese workers are now paying 100-200 dollars for the teeth , bones and body parts of Jaguars and sadly locals are blinded by this money and are wiping them out.

Imagine the Jungles without Jaguars !! At the rate they are being killed its a real possibility.

 

We just recieved 2 Tourists who flew all the way from Mexico to Bolivia to see a Jaguar in the wild and we are happy to saw that we achieved their goals, with this in mind we have to look at the damage people are causing by killing Jaguars for less than 100 dollars per cat for the teeth to go to Chinese traders and what they are doing for the future of their kids and families.

Firstly by supporting Chinese and their own Greed they are severly affecting the environment , Jaguars are key predators and keep the ecosystem in balance, without them other species become overpopulated which alters forest growth and also spreads disease.

2ndly they are killing one of the Icons of South Amercia, and when the Jaguars have been wiped out like they have been in Argentina , most of Central America and USA only then will they understand how much Bolivia has lost. A forest void of Jaguars and other key predators is no longer a forest as it has lost its soul.

In terms of the economy a Jaguar is worth so much more to Bolivia than people can imagine, people travel from all over the world to Bolivia hoping to get a glance of this beautiful cat which in turn means more money for all, hotels are booked, guides are used, transport, restauraunts and more are all booked which means more money and employment for Bolivia.

A Jaguar lives for up to 15 years in the wild so imagine how many tourists have come to try and take a photo and how much money this brings into Bolivia over the life of just 1 Jaguar yet sadly as per usual mans desire to make a quick dollar is rapidly driving this amazing big cat to extinction.

With this in mind, lets hope locals, tourists and the government can start to understand that the life of a Jaguar or other species are worth much more to Bolivia than 100 -500 dollars and that action has to be taken to ensure the trade of animal parts in Bolivia is met with the strongest deterrents possible.

BOLIVIA WITHOUT JAGUARS IS NOT BOLIVIA !!

 

 

Note for those interested to discover wild Bolivia.

The place I have seen a jaguar in Madidi (with another local agent) is the same Nick use to go.

Nicks offers fantastic tour in the Bolivian Chaco, and reached really good results in tapirs and jaguars observations.

Let's hope tourism will develop in there, I greatly admire Nick perseverance.

If Kaa Iya is rather an expedition compared to Pantanal confortable lodges in Tres Irmaos region, Nick uses camera traps during the trip to show his tourists the most secretive wildlife he cannot guarantee to his clients, which I really appreciate.

 

I really expect to visit KINP one day with Nick, as well as other new destinations I discovered a couple of year before: Reserva Barba Azul (Beni) to see the once thought extinct endemic macaw, Red front macaw in the upper dry valleys. He also offers tour in Noel Kempff, Pantanal and seems to have a new tour to see the andean cock of the rock...

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Oh no - not Jaguars as well. For their teeth? :o:angry:

 

Horrific. Let's hope people listen and yes, more tourists are needed.

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Freaking jaguars now? UGH!

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Sadly after speaking to locals in the Bolivian Amazon Area Jaguars are now under attack !!, Chinese workers are now paying 100-200 dollars for the teeth , bones and body parts of Jaguars and sadly locals are blinded by this money and are wiping them out.

Imagine the Jungles without Jaguars !! At the rate they are being killed its a real possibility.

We just recieved 2 Tourists who flew all the way from Mexico to Bolivia to see a Jaguar in the wild and we are happy to saw that we achieved their goals, with this in mind we have to look at the damage people are causing by killing Jaguars for less than 100 dollars per cat for the teeth to go to Chinese traders and what they are doing for the future of their kids and families.

Firstly by supporting Chinese and their own Greed they are severly affecting the environment , Jaguars are key predators and keep the ecosystem in balance, without them other species become overpopulated which alters forest growth and also spreads disease.

BOLIVIA WITHOUT JAGUARS IS NOT BOLIVIA !!

 

~ @@jeremie

 

It's grim reading but necessary to know.

Thank you for posting this information on Safaritalk.

There's no easy way to rationalize what's going on with jaguars in Bolivia.

As with animal parts from Africa, a common aspect links the two.

There is an enormous need to engage and educate, in order to confront the disastrous loss of precious wildlife for no more than trinkets.

Merci beaucoup!

Tom K.

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Now it's the jaguars ..... The chinese don't leave any species alone!!! Very very sad .........

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Posted (edited)

Now it's the jaguars ..... The chinese don't leave any species alone!!! Very very sad .........

 

~ @@madaboutcheetah

 

After reading your comment about twelve hours ago, it stayed in the front of my mind all day. I kept thinking about it over and over and over.

Going about my business here in Beijing, I silently toted up the trends and the species involved, which are being directly influenced by steady or accelerating demand from wealthy consumers in this country and its neighbor to the immediate south.

During the past couple of months I've read several thousand archived Safaritalk posts to better educate myself about issues about which I'm a green novice.

Going back years, in numerous Safaritalk posts environmental travesties have been directly linked to individuals and to clandestinely organized groups from one country above all others.

That's been acutely painful to read...and even more painful to bluntly consider the suffering and needless slaughter of precious species for no better reason than conspicuous consumption mixed with superstition.

There's no denying it...there's no blithe justifying it...there's no shrugging it off as a mere cultural difference...there's no excuse that maybe they didn't know what they were doing or about its devastating impact.

It comes down to unbridled venality, conniving on a global scale, an attitude that environmental losses somehow don't really matter, and shameless greed on an industrial scale.

Although I'm not a citizen here, I feel in part responsible for what is going on throughout the globe by those from this society. My friends, many of my students and I feel repugnance for what we hear and read.

Being a person of no consequence, the most that I'm able to do is to continually raise these issues among my students, hoping that in so doing a tiny shaft of light might penetrate the insufferable gloom here.

@@madaboutcheetah, I wish that it were possible to do much more than apologize to you for this. You have every right to feel revulsed by such foul behavior, especially as it seems to be metastasizing globally.

It can't be said strongly enough — press conferences, press releases, wishful thinking of all sorts — these won't do anything substantial to stop this ongoing environmental catastrophe.

Without independent verification every six months, for several years, unmistakably indicating that illegal behavior has entirely ceased, ways will be found as the arts of deception have been finely honed to a razor-sharp edge.

I'm blue, @@madaboutcheetah. As a kid I lived in Argentina and thus have a lasting goodwill for South America, its delightful ‘gente’ — people — and its wildlife, including jaguars.

I'm very, very sorry that this is happening, especially because of who is — once again — linked to it.

Part of why I've joined Safaritalk is because I want to do my small part to encourage those of you who are in the front lines of wildlife conservation.

I fervently hope that a concerted effort will soon be made by those capable of doing so to frankly confront these issues and make clear that the Earth's fragile ecological balance cannot tolerate such thoughtless slaughter to continue by anyone, including those from the country where I've lived for 16 years.

With Heavyhearted Sadness,

Tom K.

Edited by Tom Kellie
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@@Tom Kellie This is not your fault; so please do not take on the burden of something over which you have no control. Apart from the consumers there are many along the way that facilitate this process and profit from it handsomely along the way

 

Just continue to do what you are doing with your students by opening their eyes a little and developing, as teachers do, their enquiring minds. This is really valuable work.

 

Above all take care yourself and do not rock the boat too much. I well remember one of your early post about expressing views that may not suit locally.

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@@Tom Kellie This is not your fault; so please do not take on the burden of something over which you have no control. Just continue to do what you are doing with your students by opening their eyes a little and developing, as teachers do, their enquiring minds.

 

Above all take care yourself and do not rock the boat too much. I well remember one of your early post about expressing views that may not suit locally.

 

~ @@wilddog

 

Thank you so much.

Wise advice which I'll follow.

Tom K.

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Tom, as Wild dog rightly said ...... Please don't apologize as it's not your fault.

 

Maybe things will be too late for many of the species before these nations and their consumers continuously decimate their numbers ......... Perhaps it can only get better? after all, this is rock bottom!!!

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Why are the Chinese singled out ?

 

has the cattle farming conflict, habitat loss, encroaching agri dev, trophy hunting, skins/parts already part of illegal trafficking etc etc become out of style for headlines ? ' greedy Chinese ' an easier scapegoat than dissecting the bigger issues ?

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Tom, as Wild dog rightly said ...... Please don't apologize as it's not your fault.

 

Maybe things will be too late for many of the species before these nations and their consumers continuously decimate their numbers ......... Perhaps it can only get better? after all, this is rock bottom!!!

 

http://safaritalk.net/topic/14593-global-population-collapse-of-yellow-breasted-buntings-due-to-illegal-hunting/

 

~ @@madaboutcheetah

 

Thank you.

The above post links to an article in Conservation Biology concerning drastic collapse of a once numerous bird species due to illegal hunting for human consumption.

With limited resources and an increasing global population, severe effects are proliferating.

The Safaritalk community is one place where the issues are aired and discussed, which is heartening.

I appreciate your kindness.

Tom K.

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Why are the Chinese singled out ?

 

has the cattle farming conflict, habitat loss, encroaching agri dev, trophy hunting, skins/parts already part of illegal trafficking etc etc become out of style for headlines ? ' greedy Chinese ' an easier scapegoat than dissecting the bigger issues ?

 

~ @@wenchy

 

Thank you for pointing out the salient factors having a devastating impact on global wildlife and plant species.

May I please add another factor?

It's the indiscriminate dumping of both known toxins and of inadequately studied macromolecules into soil, water and the atmosphere.

In classes we've been considering what results when chemicals — whether liquids, gases or particulate solids — are dumped, without extensive advance consideration of possible consequences.

What may be harmless for one species may be catastrophic for others.

http://safaritalk.net/topic/14516-indian-vultures-continue-to-die/

As one case among many, the unintended consequences of Diclofenac use has been a steep decline in vulture population levels.

Your comprehensive list well summarizes the host of factors in play, each of which urgently need to be addressed. Toxins and chemicals throughout the environment might be another such factor.

Thank you so much for your comment.

Tom K.

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I will quote Nick who has just posted this on Nickadventure Facebook account:

 

We just visited the markets of Sucre and sadly like Santa Cruz and other citys in Bolivia locals were selling the teeth, claws and body parts of Jaguars and other wildlife which is threatened with extinction.

The markets which are located next to a major tourist bar are aimed at tourists so we plead for travellers not to support this trade and buy necklaces made of Jaguar Claws, wallets of skins etc - tourists are just as much to blame as the sellers or killers of the wildlife as buying these products drives the trade.

If the local governments, public or police dont care then it's up to travellers to say no and stop driving the trade. Its simple if you dont buy then there will be no market.

The buying teeth and claws of wildlife should never be supported so please share and help spread the word.

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