gagan

Favourite safari beverage..

71 posts in this topic

East Africa is all about Tusker and Tangawezi and man I love orange Fanta in glass. Tried Tafel, Windhoek, Mosi and Castle with a Tusker on the Kenya airways flight home. I've given all my pets African names and I think Tangawezi might be next.

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a very cold Pilsner Lager does wonders for me after a long, hot dusty day out.

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Posted (edited)

Amarula can be bought through Bevmo in the US (to the person who said they couldn't get it here). I had it in cocoa once, but mostly on the rocks. I served some to friends in the states, but nothing tastes as good as it does out in the bush. Otherwise G&T seems just right, as someone said.

Edited by fictionauthor

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~ Re-reading this thread has set me to thinking about passion juice again.



I leave for Kenya one week from tomorrow, so the dream is heading towards refreshing reality in the foreseeable future.



Having been abstemious nearly all of my life, alcohol doesn't come to mind when I think of going on safari.



The sole exception has been a recurring taste for South African Fish Hoek rosé, as offered in Sopa lodges.



Chilled in a bucket, seated on a terrace, watching a sunset, it's a pleasant coda to a long day.



Tea with ample milk and sugar has been an acquired taste in lodges and tented camps.



At home I wouldn't prepare it in that fashion, yet while on safari its satisfying.



The plain reality is that most of the beverages I consume on safari are small boxed juices bought at a Nairobi petrol station before setting out.



Black currant, mixed fruit, red grape, pink guava, apple, and passion. They're my safari treats!



Tom K.


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A local beer for sundowners. Tusker, Nile Special (Big beer. Big Taste), Everest spring to mind

With dinner red wine if available. If not I will continue with a beer.

Not really possible on most safaris. A proper lime soda always works for me. With the sugar syrup on the side so you can add it according to your taste. Best one ever was on the terrace of a maharajah's palace now Taj hotel. I still have no idea how I blagged my way into that place considering how I was dressed at the time!

 

Almost never spirits. Although I do remember having to drink the local rice whisky when homestaying with the Iban in Borneo, it was considered impolite to say no. I had about two sips but luckily the friend I was with kept them happy drinking her's and also the rest of my share :)

 

And naturally tea. Favourite way to be consumed is with cake before the afternoon game drive!

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Bitter lime was my favourite drink ..alongside chinese food in dar es salaam..arusha's ginger tea and azam juice I still remember. .

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Bitter lime was my favourite drink ..alongside chinese food in dar es salaam..arusha's ginger tea and azam juice I still remember. .

 

~ @@gagan

 

If bitter lime was your favorite drink...as well as ginger tea and azam juice...what is your present favorite?

As ever, I enjoy a small cup of cherry juice, with most of the day featuring Darjeeling tea with honey, cinnamon and lemon.

Tom K.

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~ @@gagan

 

While writing my trip report I remembered a drink which I especially enjoy on safari.

It's rose – hibiscus juice. It's sold in small boxes in supermarkets or at service station shops.

The slightly tangy taste is refreshing during arid game drives in Samburu.

If it was available where I live, I'd buy it.

The closest that I'm able to get is brewing rose – hibiscus tea, with honey and cinnamon added.

Writing a trip report, looking at photographs, stirs up half-forgotten pleasures.

Tom K.

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water or tea

 

I don't drink alchol

 

usually only instant coffee is provided, I have nothing to do with nestles for their continued active marketing of infant feeding formular as a substitute for breast milk . Given that there are problems with the water this is unsafe.

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people here might like to know that the barman at Lewa safari camp likes to mix equal quantities of Amarula cream with good blended scotch

 

it gets a good reaction

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T.U.S.K.E.R :-)

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water or tea

 

I don't drink alchol

 

usually only instant coffee is provided, I have nothing to do with nestles for their continued active marketing of infant feeding formular as a substitute for breast milk . Given that there are problems with the water this is unsafe.

 

~ @@COSMIC RHINO

 

When I first visited Kenya, I asked for tea.

What was served to me wasn't anything at all like what I'd ever had before.

After I was told that ample milk and sugar had been added, I tried it.

A new taste! I gradually learned to like it.

Now when staying in a lodge or tented camp, I make tea more or less in the local style.

Were I to do so back home in Beijing, my students would get a good laugh!

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie I would love to try rise hibiscus tea.....was it available in tanzania? ?

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@@Tom Kellie I would love to try rise hibiscus tea.....was it available in tanzania? ?

 

~ @@gagan

 

I'm sorry, but I don't know as I've never yet visited Tanzania.

Rose hibiscus tea in small boxes, with attached flexible straw, are sold in Kenya's larger markets.

Tom K.

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~ @@gagan

An new addition to favorite safari beverages, based on this past October's visit to Sabi Sands, South Africa.

When I arrived early for the second lunch at Leopard Hills, barman Admire cheerfully suggested what he described as being a refreshing cocktail.

I'm not much of an alcohol drinker, generally sticking with tea or juices.

However, given Admire's persuasive description, I agreed to sample what's apparently the unofficial house cocktail.

It's called ‘Steelworks’. Leopard Hills makes it with fresh passionfruit, seeds and all, which appeals to yours truly.

I ended up having it as a standing pre-lunch order.

A New South Wales sheep rancher saw me drinking a ‘Steelworks’ cocktail so ordered the same. He loved it!

I'm looking forward to welcoming the new year and a return to Africa with a chilled ‘Steelworks’ within three weeks!

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie ..sounds great ...unfortunately my travelling days are at halt now...but still I drink some jaggery drinks in bangalore these days.

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~ When on safari in Kenya, a standard ritual in Nairobi is to buy small boxes of fruit juice.



@@Anthony Gitau stops at a service station to fill-up with fuel, as well as checking the suspension.



While that's going on, I slip into the service station market to buy an assortment of boxed fruit juices for use throughout the safari.



Flavors range from apple juice, to black currant juice, rose hip pomegranate juice, white grape juice and passionfruit juice.



If we're in Meru town, I also buy a large salted popcorn from the vendor outside of the door to Nakumatt.



They're refreshing during game drives, during long treks between nature reserves and in the lodge rooms before bed.



Tom K.


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Q: What do Honey Badgers drink for sundowners?

 

A: Mead.

 

 

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie I love to drink coffee in the morning while I'm on safari. Kenyan coffee is outstanding and the best coffee isn't even exported. I love to drink South African wine with my dinner.

At lunchtime I do love fruit juice as well.

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Posted (edited)

~ @@optig



In every city of moderate size or greater where I live, Kenyan coffee is offered in restaurants, coffee shops or bars.



It's marketed as a premium product, deservedly so.



Perhaps more surprisingly is that Kenyan tea is available in upscale restaurants here.



Quality matters!



Tom K.


Edited by Tom Kellie
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Just returning from Porini Lion Camp.

 

Clearly Tusker is the obvious choice when viewing the sun set behing a careully positioned girsffe or acacia.

 

What did impress me however was that my 5.30am tray included ground Kenyan coffee in a plunger - reason enough to return!

 

Interestingly given the emphasis on sustainability at Porini the wines are shipped in from Chile rather than from South Africa which would surely have a smaller carbon footprint?

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