See all Safaritalk Special Offers

Tom Kellie

Show us your bee-eaters...

23 posts in this topic

post-49296-0-94879000-1433291319_thumb.jpg

Merops superciliosus Quintet
Photographed at 5:06 pm on 9 February, 2014 at Lake Baringo, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.
ISO 800, 1/8000 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.
*****************************************************************************************************
A highlight of safaris is the presence of bee-eaters of various species. Active birds, they entertain with their arcing flights to and from a preferred perch, usually with insect prey in beak.
While drifting on Lake Baringo this Merops superciliosus, Madagascar Bee-eater, quintet was observed perched together. Their cheerful chirps enlivened the early evening silence.

 

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Tom Kellie good idea to showcase these jewel like birds. I saw these Carmine Bee-eaters at Mazambala Lodge in the Caprivi in September 2014.

 

P1060106.JPG

 

P1060107.JPG

 

P1060106.JPG

 

P1060152.JPG

 

P1060158.JPG

 

Little Bee-eaters, Mazambala Lodge

 

P1060069.JPG

 

Swallow-tailed bee-eaters, Kgalagadi, August 2014

 

38-Swallow-tailed%252520bee-eaters%25252

 

39-Swallow-tailed%252520bee-eaters%25252

 

This photo of a White-fronted bee-eater was taken at Mashatu in July 2008

 

P1010083.JPG

 

and these at Selous in July 2008

 

P1000723.JPG

 

P1000725.JPG

 

P1000727.JPG

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Tom Kellie good idea to showcase these jewel like birds. I saw these Carmine Bee-eaters at Mazambala Lodge in the Caprivi in September 2014.

 

~ @@Treepol

 

How many ‘WOW’s am I allowed?

These images are far beyond FANTASTIC !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The colors you captured are SENSATIONAL !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Who doesn't love bee-eaters?

Their activity and vibrant plumage enliven any safari.

You deserve considerable appreciation for uploading such a variety of top-quality bee-eater images.

Many thanks. I'll look for more to add, as other members will surely do.

You've set a high bar of quality for us to aspire towards!

Tom K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Tom Kellie thank you for your kind comments.

 

I must admit that bee-eaters are some of my favourite birds and I'm looking forward to adding some Indian species next year and of course, our own Rainbow bee-eater would also be nice. I'll have to work on that one.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Tom Kellie thank you for your kind comments.

 

I must admit that bee-eaters are some of my favourite birds and I'm looking forward to adding some Indian species next year and of course, our own Rainbow bee-eater would also be nice. I'll have to work on that one.

 

~ @@Treepol

 

What ?!?!?!

Australia has a bee-eater, i.e. a Merops species of its own?

Having never yet visited Australia, I didn't know that.

That's exciting, as it means Australian kids grow up with an awareness of bee-eaters.

If you or other Safaritalk members who either live in or have visited Australia might post a ‘Rainbow bee-eater’, it would be a welcome addition to this forum.

This comes as quite a surprise to me!

Thank you for mentioning it.

Tom K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Tom Kellie Here ya go Tom, Two record shots of Rainbow Bee-eaters (Merops ornatus). A common bird in northern Australia but I rarely see them as very few migrate as far south as where I live.

post-5120-0-85999200-1433332730_thumb.jpg

post-5120-0-38762100-1433332996_thumb.jpg

 

 

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Tom Kellie Here ya go Tom, Two record shots of Rainbow Bee-eaters (Merops ornatus). A common bird in northern Australia but I rarely see them as very few migrate as far south as where I live.

 

~ @@Geoff

 

What beauties!

Now I have one more reason to someday take a camera to Australia.

They migrate?

Very clear images. They definitely share characteristics with their East African cousins.

This effectively internationalizes the bee-eaters forum.

Next an Indian bee-eater is needed.

Thank you very much!

Tom K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Geoff thanks for posting your excellent photos.

 

@@Tom Kellie I will be chasing these beautiful bee-eaters in northern Queensland in July and hopefully will return with some good photos.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Geoff thanks for posting your excellent photos.

 

@@Tom Kellie I will be chasing these beautiful bee-eaters in northern Queensland in July and hopefully will return with some good photos.

 

~ @@Treepol

 

That's great news!

Thank you for letting us know.

I hope that your northern Queensland visit will exceed all expectations!

Tom K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-49296-0-61411400-1433909023_thumb.jpg



Perched at Lake Baringo



Photographed at 4:17 pm on 9 February, 2014 on Lake Baringo, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 800, 1/8000 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


Safari guides are a fairly unflappable lot, having seen quite a variety of species and interactions during their years of guiding clients in wilderness areas, week in and week out.


Therefore I was surprised when the boat guide on Lake Baringo was visibly startled when this bird was spotted. He emphasized that it was the only carmine bee-eater he'd seen there for many months.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Palm Cove, Queensland, September 2013, fairly common in the area

gallery_49445_1311_914604.jpg

 

gallery_49445_1311_1008062.jpg

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Port Douglas, August 2015

 

Finally, some good views of the Rainbow bee-eater!

 

P1000709.JPG

 

P1000717.JPG

 

Mossman River, August 2015

 

P1000871.JPG

 

P1000872.JPG

6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

~ @@Treepol

 

I've rarely seen a clear bee-eater bill-cleaning photo.

Thanks a lot for including one in this very nice batch of rainbow bee-eater images.

Tom K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blue-Cheeked Bee-Eater, Okavango Delta, 03/2014

 

gallery_19319_1000_2498503.jpg

 

European Bee-Eater, Nxai Pan, 03/2014

 

gallery_19319_1011_2733688.jpg

 

Swallow-Tailed Bee-Eater, Okavango Delta, 03/2014

 

gallery_19319_1011_2045914.jpg

 

Southern Carmine Bee-Eater, Linyanti, 03/2014

 

gallery_19319_1011_3319835.jpg

 

Chestnut-Headed Bee-Eater, Kaziranga, 03/2015

 

gallery_19319_1234_1737081.jpg

 

Blue-Bearded Bee-Eater, Kaziranga, 03/2015

 

gallery_19319_1234_3791787.jpg

 

Little Bee-Eater, Meru, 09/2014

 

gallery_19319_1104_1535363.jpg

 

Green Bee-Eater, Tadoba, 03/2015

 

gallery_19319_1252_3689989.jpg

 

 

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

~ @@michael-ibk

 

You've spoiled us with such a lavish selection of GORGEOUS bee-eaters.

In all of my safaris, I've not seen even half the species you've shared here.

No one species stands out, as they're all really lovely.

From your images it's clear that you're ‘bee-eater conscious’ while on safari.

Many, many THANKS for these!

Tom K.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-49296-0-36418900-1447280196_thumb.jpg



Meru Little Bee-eater Pair



Photographed at 9:31 am on 20 July, 2015 in Meru National Park, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 200, 1/500 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


Much of the territory we explored in Meru National Park was self-evidently ‘off the beaten path’. Anthony and I enjoy following the most overgrown tracks to see what might be living in remote areas.


In one large stretch, there were few plants with green foliage. Therefore these two Little Bee-eaters stood out when we approached them. Such vibrant plumage in an otherwise drab setting!

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

White fronted bee eaters - Selous NP, Tanzania

These guys were nesting along the Rufiji River bank

 

RD8a1Aah.jpg

 

P600nf2h.jpg

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

European Beeeater, Hungary May 2017

Beeeater.JPG

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another species of Bee-eater. 

Red bearded Bee-eater from Deramakot, Borneo. 

Red bearded bee-eater2.jpg

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

~ @Antee

 

Beautiful bird species and a terrific photograph.

 

Thank you for posting it.

 

Tom K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same location (Deramakot, Borneo), same species (Red-bearded Bee-eater)...could it be the same bird as posted by @Antee???

 

DSC_9966_edited-1-L.jpg

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blue-Throated Bee-eater - Borneo Rainforest Lodge

 

DSC_2195_edited-1-L.jpg

 

Alan

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


© 2006 - 2017 www.safaritalk.net - Talking Safaris and African Wildlife Conservation since 2006. Passionate about Africa.