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THE IMPORTANCE OF WILDLIFE CONSERVANCIES IN EXPANDING THE AREA OF PROTECTED HABITAT FOR WILDLIFE IN KENYA

Kenya conservancies Masai Mara

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#1 Soukous

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 07:53 AM

This is an interesting read.

 

It is a blog post from Jake Grieves-Cook, MD of Gamewatcheres safaris and Porini Camps and also a Safaritalk member ( @JakeGC ).

 

http://www.porini.co...dlife-in-kenya/


Edited by Soukous, 26 May 2015 - 07:55 AM.

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#2 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 09:11 AM

Thanks for that @Soukous - Yes, saw that the other day and so well said in that article ...... the conservancies are the future!!!


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#3 Tom Kellie

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 09:58 AM

This is an interesting read.

 

It is a blog post from Jake Grieves-Cook, MD of Gamewatcheres safaris and Porini Camps and also a Safaritalk member ( @JakeGC ).

 

http://www.porini.co...dlife-in-kenya/

 

~ @Soukous

 

Although the images were blocked here, the text and maps were available.

 

Fascinating, as I only travel in Kenya. For several safaris, the term ‘conservancy’ was no more than a word, lacking any concrete sense of reality.

 

During the past six months I've been getting to know what it means.

 

Safaritalk member @Safaridude endorsed an explanation by @armchair bushman which laid out what exactly was meant by the various terms used in Kenya.

 

Thank you for this article, which makes a strong case for conservancies integrating the needs of wildlife and those of local communities.

 

BTW: I looked at the Porini camps which were advertised. To my surprise, they're affordable and look like good value for money.

 

Tom K.



#4 douglaswise

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 10:15 AM

I'm not sure that one should draw any conclusions from the movements of single animals from two species.  The author seemed to arguing on very slim evidence that the collared lion avoided inhabited areas.  On that basis, one could argue that the cheetah was equally avoiding the core lion habitat.  This brings with it the possibility of the need for uncomfortable future choices as wildlife diminishes in the face of population growth:  Which predator species is prioritised for conservation within the guild of predators?

 

I accept entirely that I may be accused of being somewhat mischievous and that I fully endorse the author's claims relating to the benefits of private conservancies.  



#5 JakeGC

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 03:22 PM

@douglaswise, I note that you take issue with the researcher Niels Mogensen's statement that the tracking of the collared lioness showed that "despite this lion’s territory being located on the edge of protected areas, she rarely ventured into community lands".

 

I don't know if you are familiar with Ol Kinyei Conservancy but it is located immediately adjacent to community land and the first map below shows its location (in green) and its boundaries. Then the second map shows the lion's movements in yellow and it is clear that she mainly stays within the conservancy boundary apart from moving along the Olare Lemuny River which is to the north of the conservancy and which is not settled and is edged by riverine forest. It seems pretty clear? Or maybe I have not understood what you are saying?

MapOK copy.jpg

OKmap.jpg

I do agree with your second comment that the collared cheetahs' movements might indicate that she was avoiding lions. I'm sure that is right and we find that where there is a very heavy density of lions with several prides as well as free-ranging males, such as in Olare Motorogi, then the cheetahs tend to give the area a wide berth.  But even so, they are present within the Conservancies' boundaries most of the time, as shown on the tracking map of the cheetah.
 
You didn't mention the elephant tracking map. When we first started the Selenkay Conservancy in Amboseli eco-sytem 17 years ago, they had not seen an elephant there in 2 decades. Now the elephants have expanded their range from the park into the conservancy and we see them in Selenkay Conservancy all the time. Right now we have the EB family of elephants inside the conservancy. Cynthia Moss who has been studying the Amboseli elephants for 40 years is very supportive of what we are doing in Selenkay and she wrote recently:
 
"Selenkay has been very beneficial to the elephants and to the ecosystem as a whole:

  • There are several Amboseli families and numerous bulls that use the Conservancy year round thus taking pressure off the Park.
  • In the severe drought of 2009 the elephants that had moved to Selenkay had very few losses compared to the families that remained in and around the Park.
  • There has been no poaching of elephants in the Conservancy nor is there human-elephant conflict."

Finally, I'm glad to see your endorsement of the benefits of private conservancies. If you are in Kenya anytime I would be glad to meet you for a chat as I'm sure we could learn from your own experience as a researcher.


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#6 pault

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 06:36 AM

Very intersting and very valuable. And we'll get much more data on this in future years I guess? Another conservancy safari for me this year. A great (if quite selfish) way to spend money where it might count.

 

@Tom Kellie  Yes, Porini are really good value at the moment (shhh... don't tell the previous poster) comparatively.


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#7 douglaswise

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 08:56 AM

@JakeGC:

 

I was not intending to take issue with Niels Mogensen's statement relating to the movement of the collared lioness.  In fact, I was attempting to make the point that, in research, it is dangerous to generalise about animal behaviour based on observations of a single animal or social group. Notwithstanding, I, myself, went on to do precisely what I was advising against when going on to discuss the cheetah movement pattern.  In fact, I think that anecdotal and unquantified observations made about lion behaviour consequent upon creation of conservation areas  almost certainly correct.  Thus, citing a single quantified example was merely intended to be illustrative rather than to be proof per se.

 

To the extent that I was intending to say anything useful, it was this:  Conservation areas of limited size that are not surrounded by others or by corridors or national reserves will have to have some degree of management (human intervention) to maintain the required mix of species.  This will often require the culling or removal by other means of excessive numbers of some of them.  As many specialist cattle ranches in the Laikipia region were gradually converted to a mix of game and cattle, there was a flourishing of wild species.  Nevertheless, in the early stages, there was a tendency to kill lions, which were genuine threats to domestic animals.  Some parts of the region have now gone further and removed all domestic grazers, leading to further gains in wild biomass.  In the latter circumstances, lions are unmanaged.  However, work at Mpala research station (Georgiadis), which has tracked these changed land use patterns, has suggested that there was greater mesoherbivore species diversity (not biomass) before the lions became tolerated and that, now, several species are in marked decline.

 

I appreciate your offer to meet, but I'm probably getting a bit past it!  However, I do have one bee in my bonnet, namely selenium deficiency.  When in Laikipia in the mid 80s, I found that the domestic stock there were, by UK standards, highly deficient in selenium.  When in Ethiopia earlier this year, I had a chance meeting with a researcher who was just submitting  his PhD on the subject of selenium deficiency in human populations of various African countries and its possible adverse consequences.  We subsequently corresponded.  It would seem that selenium is very poorly available over great areas of Africa and, particularly, on red soils.  Selenium deficiency in ruminants is associated with muscle weakness and poor breeding success.  I have often wondered whether there might be huge potential for increasing wild biomass by making selenium-containing salt licks available.  I have not followed up on this, but do feel somebody ought to be looking into it if the work hasn't been done already.  


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#8 twaffle

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 09:11 AM

@douglaswise you make a very interesting point regarding the selenium deficiencies and perhaps it would be an ideal subject for one of the Kenyan guides who is studying for his/her Gold level.  I believe that research is part of this and it could have long term benefits for wildlife.


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#9 Tom Kellie

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 12:19 PM

@Tom Kellie  Yes, Porini are really good value at the moment (shhh... don't tell the previous poster) comparatively.

 

~ @pault

 

Most interesting!

 

I'll read a bit more about them this evening.

 

Tom K.



#10 douglaswise

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 02:16 PM

@twaffle:

 

Re research on possible selenium deficiency:

 

Relatively unqualified people on the ground collecting samples for a research laboratory could possibly help.  However, with wildlife, comprising a suitable species mix with sufficient samples from each species and, preferably during both wet and dry seasons, it wouldn't be simple.  If deficiency were suspected from such sampling, measuring behavioural and breeding responses to mineral licks would need to follow.  These might be more suitable for trainee guides to monitor.

 

What one can predict with some assurance is that certain African soil types are deficient relative to so-called proper levels. Whether the local wildlife has learned to live with this without being affected is another matter.

 

Anyway, if this matter hasn't been properly addressed, it should be.  Perhaps it has.  I'm out of touch with this field of research so don't know what's been going on. 


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#11 JakeGC

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 05:19 PM

@douglaswise
Many thanks for clarifying and yes, I agree that citing these individual results was meant to be illustrative rather than proof.
 

Also I already believe strongly in what you say about the importance of having conservation areas joined together or linked by corridors to avoid having isolated islands with wildlife confined or cut off. That is exactly what we have been trying to achieve with our conservancies in the Mara and this has been a mission for some of us since we first set up Ol Kinyei over 10 years ago, to be followed by Olare Orok, Motorogi and Naboisho. These are all unfenced and joined up to form over 100,000 acres connected to the Mara Reserve which is of course connected to the much larger Serengeti.The map below shows the 100,000 acres ringed in red that has been set aside as unsettled wildlife habitat in the form of the conservancies in which we are involved. Our example was then followed by some more safari operators who did the same with Mara North Conservancy and others further to the north of the reserve.

OMc-Naboisho-OlKinyei.jpg

 

Thank you for highlighting the matter of Selenium deficiency and the possibility that there might be the potential for improving biomass by use of wild salt-licks.
There are numerous natural salt-licks within the conservancies that attract wild herbivores and I will see if we can get these analysed and seek advice on adding selenium.

The costs of leasing the land and the management costs of the conservancies are born entirely by the safari companies who have partnered to set up the conservancies.  To cover these costs we all depend upon the income from our small camps. With the present slump in tourism especially from the UK market where the travel advisory has had an impact on the outbound tour operators who were sending tourists to Kenya, we are facing a challenge to keep the conservancies going. My own company, Gamewatchers Safaris, has a fixed annual overhead of more than US$1Million for the conservancy costs and this is meant to be covered by our income from our Porini Camps.  It is certainly not the easiest way for a business to make a return on investment from tourism! The easy way is to do what the hundred other companies in the Mara do: build a large camp or lodge on a plot of land right next to, or inside, the Reserve, not in a conservancy. Then you can employ fewer staff as they will be from town and with previous hotel experience so you don’t have to bear all the costs of running a conservancy, training staff, creating jobs and livelihoods for community members and trying to generate other benefits from the conservancy for both wildlife and people! But we keep trying. And it is very rewarding when we see the the vegetation in the conservancies regenerate and big increases in numbers of big cats and herbivores...

 


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#12 Tom Kellie

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 10:39 AM

Thank you for highlighting the matter of Selenium deficiency and the possibility that there might be the potential for improving biomass by use of wild salt-licks.

There are numerous natural salt-licks within the conservancies that attract wild herbivores and I will see if we can get these analysed and seek advice on adding selenium.

The costs of leasing the land and the management costs of the conservancies are born entirely by the safari companies who have partnered to set up the conservancies.  To cover these costs we all depend upon the income from our small camps. With the present slump in tourism especially from the UK market where the travel advisory has had an impact on the outbound tour operators who were sending tourists to Kenya, we are facing a challenge to keep the conservancies going. My own company, Gamewatchers Safaris, has a fixed annual overhead of more than US$1Million for the conservancy costs and this is meant to be covered by our income from our Porini Camps.  It is certainly not the easiest way for a business to make a return on investment from tourism! But we keep trying. And it is very rewarding when we see the the vegetation in the conservancies regenerate and big increases in numbers of big cats and herbivores...

 

~ @JakeGC

 

When I returned home from a long day in the classroom and logged into Safaritalk I didn't anticipate being moved.

 

Yet your superlative post has touched me as few others have.

 

Your gracious and eloquent expression underscores the sincerity of your commitment.

 

Thank you for carefully explaining the situation with conservancies in such a straightforward, nuanced manner.

 

I've been to Masai Mara five times but never yet visited any conservancy.

 

The Porini Camps have lately come to my attention. If someday I book a Porini Camp, it will have been directly influenced by my highly favorable impression of your post.

 

With Respect,

 

Tom K.



#13 douglaswise

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 01:31 PM

@JakeGC:

 

I'd be really delighted to learn what you discover if you look into the natural mineral lick composition  - I think animals are drawn to them mainly for salt.  I don't think they are known to have any "nutritional wisdom" with respect to trace minerals. Thus, if they were present or not along with the salt, it would be happenstance rather than selection.

 

I entirely sympathise with the reduction of tourist numbers.  Clearly, a large part of that is due, as you state, to perceived lack of security.  However, I have often wondered whether the opening of ever more safari destinations (based on the opening of new conservancies and creation of more camps to finance them) is a sustainable model unless the ones of which you disapprove are closed. Were you not already beginning to see a drop in bed occupancy rate (before security became an issue) as beds increased faster than tourists?  I have no concept of the previous supply demand balance. 

 

I entirely agree that the more remote, smaller camps offer a better experience for the serious safari-goer, but the cost/bed night is inevitably and justifiably going to be higher.  To that extent, you have differentiated yourself from the mass tourist market, simultaneously cutting the numbers of potential punters or, alternativey, cutting the time that many can afford to stay.  I would suggest that international air travel is becoming an increasingly disgusting experience (perhaps it's just my age showing!).  Thus, coming to Kenya only for a few days doesn't make sense.  Often, diluting the safari cost by adding a beach holiday is the approach adopted to overcome the problem, but it works better for those who are not serious about wildlife.  How much could you drop costs without dropping profits by offering much longer stays at one camp or, at most, a couple of contiguous ones?  

 

I was wondering what USP your camps might offer that are not provided by your upmarket competitors, thus potentially gaining advantage over them?  Using myself as an example, the opportunity to spend time with wild dogs by dint of their having been collared was the bait that attracted me on my visit to Kenya last year.  I'm sure others, however, might have found the presence of collars repugnant.  I'm happy with a guide who can name all animals and birds for me.  I'll carefully try to remember them all, but will forget most quite soon (another sign of age?)  I'm not sure I'd be happy to be stuck on all game drives with serious birders, nor, for that matter, with very serious photographers.  It must be difficult to run your business and balance conflicting tourist needs, quite apart from attempting to be pleasant to those for whom you feel antipathy!  I suppose the quality of guiding and hosting is all important to a visitor's experience.  The last thing I want is a guide who's been through guide school because it was next best option for him to qualifying as a better paid electrician. However, if he had a pleasant nature and good enunciation, he might well be perfect for others.

 

Is there any way of extracting income from the leased land over and above tourist income - even from highly intensive, value-added agriculture on a very small proportion thereof?  How about walked-up game bird shooting on adjacent community-occupied lands to add money to conservancy lease payments?  I know I'm rambling horribly.  However, for all conservancies to succeed, there may have to be some out-of- the-box thinking.

 

Whatever, good luck! 


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#14 JakeGC

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 03:28 PM

 

Thank you for highlighting the matter of Selenium deficiency and the possibility that there might be the potential for improving biomass by use of wild salt-licks.

There are numerous natural salt-licks within the conservancies that attract wild herbivores and I will see if we can get these analysed and seek advice on adding selenium.

The costs of leasing the land and the management costs of the conservancies are born entirely by the safari companies who have partnered to set up the conservancies.  To cover these costs we all depend upon the income from our small camps. With the present slump in tourism especially from the UK market where the travel advisory has had an impact on the outbound tour operators who were sending tourists to Kenya, we are facing a challenge to keep the conservancies going. My own company, Gamewatchers Safaris, has a fixed annual overhead of more than US$1Million for the conservancy costs and this is meant to be covered by our income from our Porini Camps.  It is certainly not the easiest way for a business to make a return on investment from tourism! But we keep trying. And it is very rewarding when we see the the vegetation in the conservancies regenerate and big increases in numbers of big cats and herbivores...

 

~ @JakeGC

 

When I returned home from a long day in the classroom and logged into Safaritalk I didn't anticipate being moved.

 

Yet your superlative post has touched me as few others have.

 

Your gracious and eloquent expression underscores the sincerity of your commitment.

 

Thank you for carefully explaining the situation with conservancies in such a straightforward, nuanced manner.

 

I've been to Masai Mara five times but never yet visited any conservancy.

 

The Porini Camps have lately come to my attention. If someday I book a Porini Camp, it will have been directly influenced by my highly favorable impression of your post.

 

With Respect,

 

Tom K.

 

@Tom Kellie
Thank you Tom for your very kind words. We hope to welcome you to one of our camps in the future!


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#15 JakeGC

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 04:16 PM

@JakeGC:

 

I'd be really delighted to learn what you discover if you look into the natural mineral lick composition  - I think animals are drawn to them mainly for salt.  I don't think they are known to have any "nutritional wisdom" with respect to trace minerals. Thus, if they were present or not along with the salt, it would be happenstance rather than selection.

 

I entirely sympathise with the reduction of tourist numbers.  Clearly, a large part of that is due, as you state, to perceived lack of security.  However, I have often wondered whether the opening of ever more safari destinations (based on the opening of new conservancies and creation of more camps to finance them) is a sustainable model unless the ones of which you disapprove are closed. Were you not already beginning to see a drop in bed occupancy rate (before security became an issue) as beds increased faster than tourists?  I have no concept of the previous supply demand balance. 

 

I entirely agree that the more remote, smaller camps offer a better experience for the serious safari-goer, but the cost/bed night is inevitably and justifiably going to be higher.  To that extent, you have differentiated yourself from the mass tourist market, simultaneously cutting the numbers of potential punters or, alternativey, cutting the time that many can afford to stay.  I would suggest that international air travel is becoming an increasingly disgusting experience (perhaps it's just my age showing!).  Thus, coming to Kenya only for a few days doesn't make sense.  Often, diluting the safari cost by adding a beach holiday is the approach adopted to overcome the problem, but it works better for those who are not serious about wildlife.  How much could you drop costs without dropping profits by offering much longer stays at one camp or, at most, a couple of contiguous ones?  

 

I was wondering what USP your camps might offer that are not provided by your upmarket competitors, thus potentially gaining advantage over them?  Using myself as an example, the opportunity to spend time with wild dogs by dint of their having been collared was the bait that attracted me on my visit to Kenya last year.  I'm sure others, however, might have found the presence of collars repugnant.  I'm happy with a guide who can name all animals and birds for me.  I'll carefully try to remember them all, but will forget most quite soon (another sign of age?)  I'm not sure I'd be happy to be stuck on all game drives with serious birders, nor, for that matter, with very serious photographers.  It must be difficult to run your business and balance conflicting tourist needs, quite apart from attempting to be pleasant to those for whom you feel antipathy!  I suppose the quality of guiding and hosting is all important to a visitor's experience.  The last thing I want is a guide who's been through guide school because it was next best option for him to qualifying as a better paid electrician. However, if he had a pleasant nature and good enunciation, he might well be perfect for others.

 

Is there any way of extracting income from the leased land over and above tourist income - even from highly intensive, value-added agriculture on a very small proportion thereof?  How about walked-up game bird shooting on adjacent community-occupied lands to add money to conservancy lease payments?  I know I'm rambling horribly.  However, for all conservancies to succeed, there may have to be some out-of- the-box thinking.

 

Whatever, good luck! 

@douglaswise
Many thanks for all your comments which really are food for thought!
To reply briefly:
1.Natural mineral licks and selenium - thank you for drawing this to my attention. It's very interesting and if we get any further info I will report back!
2. Re costs and length of safari itinerary, yes a couple of  days safari is too short for international visitors but we find that using our Nairobi Tented Camp for a night in Nairobi instead of a concrete city hotel and then doing 6 or 7 nights more on safari in 2 or 3 camps together with 2 days on the international flights gives 10 days away from home which seems what many people these days are looking for. We offer discounts or even free nights for longer stays at the same camp outside the peak season. For those who don't mind an element of "roughing it" we also have more basic mobile camps in 2 conservancies in Amboseli and Mara where the price of 6 nights / 7 days, including internal flights between Nairobi, Amboseli and Mara is under $2000 for 6 nights / 7 days - on our Adventure Camping Safari.

3. Re our USP and setting ourselves apart from competitors, we do not claim to offer super luxury and we do not have jacuzzis, Persian carpets, crystal cut glass or chandeliers as some do! We aim to offer comfort in the bush with spacious tents having en suite bathrooms and flush loos, hospitable staff and attentive guides. For me, the luxury is being on safari in a small camp (maximum size 10 tents) with other like-minded guests for company and seeing the wildlife in an exclusive wilderness without hordes of tourist vans and with knowledgeable and enthusiastic guides drawn from the local community. And having very flexible arrangements so that you can stay out all day if you wish as well as bush breakfasts, picnic lunches, sundowners and night drives at no extra cost. While at the same time knowing that the money spent on the safari is being used to generate livelihoods for the local people and is allowing the wildlife habitat to be protected as a conservancy. This seems to strike a chord with our guests as we have a high percentage of regular repeat business and the reviews about us on TripAdvisor generally seem very positive.
4. Re your comments about whether the huge number of alternative camps could be affecting our occupancies, I don't believe this has a significant impact as we are a different product and our guests have figured that out and we attract a particular type of clientele who are more into a memorable safari experience getting close to nature and away from the masses. Under normal conditions we have always tended to have adequate occupancies. Our financial model means we only need a relatively low year-round occupancy to break even and cover our overheads and the costs of leasing and managing the conservancies. With under 90 beds in our 5 camps and guests staying an average of 5 nights or more between our camps, under normal conditions we need only to attract a very small percentage of safari visitors for it all to work financially.
5. Having said that, you are quite right that it is sensible to look at alternative opportunities to generate an income to help to pay for the conservancies and we are looking into a number of options - more details to follow at a future date...

 

Thank you for your interest and good wishes which I greatly appreciate,

Jake
 


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#16 Game Warden

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 05:42 PM

@JakeGC
 

we have a high percentage of regular repeat business and the reviews about us on TripAdvisor


Jake, see if your guests would be willing to write trip reports for Safaritalk as well :) It may well enthuse them to plan their next trip.
 

we also have more basic mobile camps in 2 conservancies in Amboseli and Mara where the price of 6 nights / 7 days, including internal flights between Nairobi, Amboseli and Mara is under $2000 for 6 nights / 7 days - on our Adventure Camping Safari.


Please do tell us more about this option by starting a new topic in the Operators Forum, I think it's very attractive for Safaritalkers.


"Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you." - African proverb.

 

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#17 Girlsnstilettos

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 06:11 PM

@JakeGC Great article. It makes me even happier I booked 3 days at Porini Amboseli in Feb. '16. We have Henry as a private guide as well. I can not wait to see this beautiful part of Kenya, and all the elephants it has to offer! I'm so glad I selected Amboseli, and Porini as one of my Kenya safari destinations :D


Edited by Girlsnstilettos, 05 June 2015 - 06:18 PM.


#18 Calvin

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 10:37 AM

Jake, you have a done a great job putting forward the reasons that the conservancy model is the way forward. I put it to all agents and prospective visitors that when you go to camps into the state parks and reserve that you are not necessarily contributing to wildlife conservation because these state lands are gazetted for ecosystem protection even if not one visitor entered them and the government would have to source funding for their upkeep by taxing the urban populations / industry. These national estates were not created for profit making by a few individuals ( lodge owners) and in my view, every one of them should be asked to remove themselves within a given time period, and relocate out onto new and existing conservancies on surrounding ( threatened) land on the basis of 350 acres of land leased per bed, and 4 km's minimum distance between properties. I think we shou,d all be able to enter the reserves on daily or camping basis at much higher entry fees, and the entire amount of these fees should go to the surrounding community land units owners to give them income and a pcsycological ownership in the protected area, and create a buffer to stop outsiders imposing 'tragedy of the commons' domestic livestock grazing and poaching - if they collectively have something to lose from such actions of an individual, they will find that individual and correct him of his wayward ways..

Do your research before booking; support any camp actually leasing land for wildlife conservancy, and don't support any camp not leasing land even if the 'experience' is supposedly better....this 'wilderness' experience you are looking for comes at a price..where there is a lodge present there is can be no 'wilderness', and every dollar going to these camps inside is a dollar less to secure the most threatened land and wildlife in the surrounding private and community lands...
  • madaboutcheetah, twaffle and inyathi like this
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Telephone: +254 (0) 733773377
Website: www.cottars.com

#19 Tom Kellie

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 11:07 AM

Do your research before booking; support any camp actually leasing land for wildlife conservancy, and don't support any camp not leasing land even if the 'experience' is supposedly better...

 

~ @Calvin

 

May I please ask a question to help me to do as you've kindly suggested?

 

What's the most effective way for a potential guest to determine whether or not any given camp is leasing conservancy land?

 

By looking somewhere on the property's own Web site?

 

By looking at a master Web site of the conservancy itself?

 

Or by looking at an independent Web site which lists out such ownership?

 

I apologize for asking, but after thinking about it, I'm uncertain where one might find such vital information.

 

Tom K.



#20 Calvin

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 08:07 PM

Tom K, this is a good question..,best way is to ask them directly exactly how much land they are leasing, and how big is their budget for leading. Then Cross check with the Maasai Mara Wildlife Conservancies association/ Northern Rangeland Trust/Laikipia Wildlfie Forum (and I am sure there are associations down in Tsavo as well) or ask at Kenya Wlidlife Conservancy Association.

If the property themselves are not willing to put their answers directly in writing so they can be checked out with the local associations, then they are probably fibbing to get your business.
  • twaffle and Tom Kellie like this
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