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Show us your shorebirds (waders)

shorebirds

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#41 offshorebirder

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 12:55 AM

@Geoff - the first Pectoral Sandpiper photo was early in spring migration (April 19 2015) and the second and third photos were in early November a couple of years ago.

 

@theplainswanderer - smashing stuff!   GORGEOUS Red-necked Avocets.  Were you shooting from a hide to get so close to them?


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#42 Tom Kellie

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 01:06 AM

Brisbane, Australia 2014

Canon EOS 7 D 

Canon 300 F/2.8 IS USM 11 

x 2 converter

 

Red-necked Avocets

 

One of Australia's resident shorebirds is the spectacular Red-necked Avocet and one of my favourite birds ... heres a few shots from my collection.

 

~ @theplainswanderer

 

Beautiful.

 

Simply lovely.

 

Many Thanks!

 

Tom K.



#43 offshorebirder

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 01:07 AM

This Least Sandpiper is well into alternate plumage (May 2):

 

16765490643_584d0ce778_o.jpg

 

 

This one is in drab basic plumage (November 10):

 

10788371296_085dd5947b_o.jpg


Edited by offshorebirder, 26 May 2015 - 01:08 AM.

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#44 Geoff

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 02:23 AM

Hooded Plover (Thinornis rubricollis)

This endemic Aussie plover is considered vulnerable. I've had the pleasure of working with this species as a volunteer on Birdlife Australia's Beach Nesting Bird project and monitor the remaining 30 odd birds within 50 kilometres of coastline near my home. I have come to know them extremely well, both on an individual & species level.

 

Adult

#138-JM-Pt-Impossible_GG_7775.jpg

#138-Pt-Roadknight_GG_2287.jpg

In flight

#138-bif_MG_8205-2.jpg

Chick (recently hatched. The parent birds have removed the egg shell from the scrape)

#138-chick-recently-hatched-Pt-Addis_MG_5632.jpg

Chick (2 days old)

#138-chick-Pt-Roadknight_MG_6822.jpg

Chicks hiding amongst beach wrack

#138-chicks-Nudists_MG_2297.jpg

Chick Portrait (33 days old, they fledge at around 35 days)

#138-Moggs-chick-portrait_GG_6097-2.jpg

Typical nest

#138-nest_GG_7428.jpg

 

 

 


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Geoff.

#45 Tom Kellie

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 02:30 AM

 

Hooded Plover (Thinornis rubricollis)

This endemic Aussie plover is considered vulnerable. I've had the pleasure of working with this species as a volunteer on Birdlife Australia's Beach Nesting Bird project and monitor the remaining 30 odd birds within 50 kilometres of coastline near my home. I have come to know them extremely well, both on an individual & species level.

 

~ @Geoff

 

Very, very nice.

 

I like the small sun-bleached shells around the speckled eggs.

 

Tom K.



#46 Game Warden

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 01:18 PM

@Tom Kellie, I hesitate to constrain your enthusiasm, but I really had in mind for this thread to be about shorebirds, not wading birds (egrets and herons). Thanks much.

 

 

@offshorebirder Let us not forget that with ST reaching a wide audience around the world, not everyone's first language is English and that some may misconstrue the meaning of your title. Especially if they are interested in bird watching but not necessarily birders. So for someone posting on ST who's first language isn't English, may not have known the difference.

 

Matt


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#47 offshorebirder

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 02:42 PM

 

@Tom Kellie, I hesitate to constrain your enthusiasm, but I really had in mind for this thread to be about shorebirds, not wading birds (egrets and herons). Thanks much.

 

 

@offshorebirder Let us not forget that with ST reaching a wide audience around the world, not everyone's first language is English and that some may misconstrue the meaning of your title. Especially if they are interested in bird watching but not necessarily birders. So for someone posting on ST who's first language isn't English, may not have known the difference.

 

Matt

 

 

@Game Warden - I understand that.  Which is why I posted the following back on page 1 of this thread to try and avoid further confusion:

 

"Sorry for any confusion - I meant this thread to be about shorebirds. I suppose it was a mistake to mention "waders". But it is a term I have heard Europeans (especially U.K. Birders) use in place of 'shorebirds' so I threw it in, mistakenly..."


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#48 offshorebirder

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 11:47 PM

Since @Geoff expressed an interest in plumage stages he rarely sees, here are some shots of first-spring immature American Golden-Plovers (Pluvialis dominica).  Adults would have been much farther into their striking black-on-gold finery that late in the spring.

This shows a Golden-Plover detecting, then extracting, then preparing to consume a Polychaete worm:

 

16413879494_5627cda2c7_o.jpg

 

16828905077_c766a92b81_o.jpg

 

17010309826_8ecfe1db96_o.jpg

 

 

This one is a head-on view of a Golden-Plover intensely focusing on finding a worm:

 

17036303785_b565ffe68e_o.jpg

 

 

These two convey the dainty, almost delicate nature of Golden-Plovers (as a consequence they are often bullied by Black-bellied Plovers):

 

7153781857_fa8bc7e101_o.jpg

 

7007660638_91d7f6bda8_o.jpg


Edited by offshorebirder, 26 May 2015 - 11:49 PM.

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#49 offshorebirder

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 12:12 AM

It seems like White-rumped Sandpipers are hard to get close enough to for good photography.  Why are my best shorebird encounters always on rainy days?

 

Here is a White-rumped Sandpiper in mid-May:

 

7197898508_878b38c814_o.jpg

 

7197898806_5e2576c0a0_o.jpg

 

7197898302_e227514310_o.jpg


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#50 Geoff

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 12:25 AM

@offshorebirder Thanks and excellent behavioural series as well.  American Golden plovers are a rare bird in Australia but occasionally one will be found amongst the Pacific Golden plover flocks.


Geoff.

#51 offshorebirder

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 12:35 AM

Wow - I had no idea AGP made it to Australia!

What other North American vagrants do y'all get?

I imagine Bristle-thighed Curlews overshoot and land in Australia from time to time.
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#52 Geoff

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 12:44 AM

Red-kneed Dotterel (Erythrogonys cinctus)

 

A small wader from mainland Australia and southern New Guinea found in and around shallow, fresh or brackish water wetlands. A dapper looking species.

#132_GG_8251.jpg

#132_GG_8057.jpg

#132_GG_9208.jpg

#132-WTP_GG_9458.jpg

 

 


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Geoff.

#53 Geoff

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 10:53 AM

Wow - I had no idea AGP made it to Australia!

What other North American vagrants do y'all get?

I imagine Bristle-thighed Curlews overshoot and land in Australia from time to time.

@offshorebirder  I had to do some research. I hope the below are North American. I left out a few that are definitely Eurasian. 

 

American Golden Plover 

 

Bristle-thighed Curlew - Not confirmed but at least one unverified report

 

Hudsonian Godwit

 

Short-billed Dowitcher

 

Long-billed Dowitcher - First confirmed sighting earlier this year and the bird was in full breeding plumage. The bird turned up on an inland lake about 4 hours drive from my place.

 

Lesser Yellowlegs

 

Stilt Sandpiper

 

White-rumped Sandpiper

 

Baird's Sandpiper

 

Dunlin

 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper

 

Grey Phalarope

 

Ringed Plover

 

Kentish Plover


Geoff.

#54 Geoff

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 11:03 AM

Grey-tailed Tattler (Tringa brevipes)

Breeds in Siberia. In Australia it is found in areas with reefs, rocky platforms and intertidal mudflats around pretty much the whole coastline.

#155_MG_4718.jpg

#155_MG_4704.jpg

#155_MG_4862.jpg

#155_MG_4857.jpg

 


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#55 offshorebirder

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 07:44 PM

 

Wow - I had no idea AGP made it to Australia!

What other North American vagrants do y'all get?

I imagine Bristle-thighed Curlews overshoot and land in Australia from time to time.

@offshorebirder  I had to do some research. I hope the below are North American. I left out a few that are definitely Eurasian. 

 

American Golden Plover 

 

Bristle-thighed Curlew - Not confirmed but at least one unverified report

 

Hudsonian Godwit

 

Short-billed Dowitcher

 

Long-billed Dowitcher - First confirmed sighting earlier this year and the bird was in full breeding plumage. The bird turned up on an inland lake about 4 hours drive from my place.

 

Lesser Yellowlegs

 

Stilt Sandpiper

 

White-rumped Sandpiper

 

Baird's Sandpiper

 

Dunlin

 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper

 

Grey Phalarope

 

Ringed Plover

 

Kentish Plover

 

 

Wow @Geoff - thanks for taking the time to research the answer.  I presume Grey Phalarope = Red Phalarope to North Americans. 

 

I think Hudsonian Godwit may be the most amazingly off-course member of the list. 

 

Ringed Plover and Kentish Plover are European birds but I am glad to learn that vagrants reach Australia.

 

Your information and photos of shorebirds in Australia has me wanting to visit even more than ever.  Hopefully in the next few years but I have a couple more Africa trips and a Pantanal (Brazil) trip to do before that.

 

By the way - I will probably fall behind you soon in the shorebird photo posting department - I just can't hang with your superb output!


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#56 kittykat23uk

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 08:19 PM

A record shot of an ibisbill in Sichaun China, a much sought after wader! I think @Tom Kellie might like this one!

16044409352_0e0a424abd_b.jpgPB120468 Ibisbill by kittykat23uk, on Flickr
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#57 Geoff

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:13 PM

 great looking bird @kittykat23uk


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Geoff.

#58 Tom Kellie

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:20 PM

A record shot of an ibisbill in Sichaun China, a much sought after wader! I think @Tom Kellie might like this one!

 

~ @kittykat23uk

 

WOW!

 

That's the first photo of Ibidorhyncha struthersii I've ever seen!       

 

Here it's depicted in field guides by artwork, rather than photos.

 

In the avian taxonomy class, it's been used on exams to see if students recognize it and realize that it's been placed in its own family. They're very good, so usually do know that.

 

I've certainly never observed, let alone photographed one.

 

Many, many BIG THANKS感谢! — for this Asian example of a wader to add to the plenitude of Australian and North American examples. 

 

Tom K.



#59 kittykat23uk

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:21 PM

Thank you @Geoff we saw a couple on our trip. The call is very distinctive which is how I picked up on our second bird.
If an experience is amazing enough to be "once in a lifetime," I want to do it every year.
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King Julian: “Who wipes?”

#60 kittykat23uk

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:24 PM

Thanks @Tom Kellie glad you like it too!
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If an experience is amazing enough to be "once in a lifetime," I want to do it every year.
Alex: "Whoa! Hold up there a second, fuzzbucket. You mean like, uh, the live in a mud hut wipe yourself with a leaf type wild?"
King Julian: “Who wipes?”





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