madaboutcheetah

Puma/Mountain Lion

18 posts in this topic

Hello,

 

I watched a documentary last night on the life of a Puma family (Might have been filmed in Patagonia) ........ but, is there anywhere reliable in the US to see them in the wild? How about in CA? and if so, where?

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Puma or cougar is the north american cousin of panther which we see in asia and africa...found mostly in central and southern usa and some parts of south america...it is active mostly during night....dont have any idea of CA....

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We have them here in CA but they are rarely seen. Occasionally unfortunately they are seen having wandered into more urban areas. There was one in the town next door to me hanging out for about 9 hours

 

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Cougar-s-9-hour-detour-in-downtown-Mountain-View-5546534.php

 

and this was right around the time I was in Costa Rica looking everywhere for one - I could have seen one right at home!

 

That story initially had a happy ending as he was tranquilized and released in the mountains where he should have been. Sadly though, he met a terrible fate a few months later:

 

http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/Puma-that-thrilled-Mountain-View-in-May-is-killed-5813092.php

 

You can read more about the pumas in my neck of the woods that are being followed here: http://santacruzpumas.org/

 

I know they see them occasionally in the LA area too - I believe I read about one living near the Hollywood sign?

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There was one on my street corner back in October (I didn't see it) and my neighbor spotted one in one of our local parks a few months later so they're around but not regularly seen. I believe the drought has made them more visible and more likely to come into neighborhoods.

 

Here's the one living in Griffith Park in LA https://www.facebook.com/P22mountainlion

 

Chan Chich Lodge in Belize has regular (a few times a week) cat sightings. We stayed there for 3 nights and saw an ocelot. Other guests have seen pumas and jaguars.

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There was one on my street corner back in October (I didn't see it) and my neighbor spotted one in one of our local parks a few months later so they're around but not regularly seen. I believe the drought has made them more visible and more likely to come into neighborhoods.

 

~ Hi, @@Patty

 

There was a mountain lion on your street corner!

Talk about living close to nature.

In your area what are they typically called?

Puma? Mountain lion? Cougar?

It's nice to read a post from you in Safaritalk.

Tom K.

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They're called mountain lions here. My neighborhood backs up to Pescadero Canyon which separates the northern boundary of Carmel from Pebble Beach. My neighbor saw one at Mission Trail park (deer carcasses are occasionally seen here) which is right in town. And I had missed this post back in December of one spotted in Point Lobos http://pointlobos.org/blog/paul-reps/mountain-lion-seen-point-lobos

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@madaboutcheetah:

 

The best place on earth to see pumas is Torres del Paine in Chilean Patagonia.

I have seen 7 different pumas in 8 observations in a 5 days safari.

If you are interested I could give you the contact of the guide who leads the tour, he leads many tour for the most famous agencies throughout the world.

 

He have also seen a puma in Berraco del Madidi, this was a really lucky sighting as pumas are really rarely seen in the wild in Amazonia.

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I think sightings in the US are rare.

 

#1 Torres del Paine in Chilean Patagonia. That's the hotspot.

 

Also Pantanal. Barranco Alto in Southern Pantanal sees them occasionally and had a lot of puma activity when I was there in early Sept 2013. I think you need similar luck here as you would in Torres del Paine in Chilean Patagonia.

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They're called mountain lions here. My neighborhood backs up to Pescadero Canyon which separates the northern boundary of Carmel from Pebble Beach. My neighbor saw one at Mission Trail park (deer carcasses are occasionally seen here) which is right in town. And I had missed this post back in December of one spotted in Point Lobos http://pointlobos.org/blog/paul-reps/mountain-lion-seen-point-lobos

 

~ @@Patty

 

Thanks for telling us that.

The deer carcasses and local reports certainly suggest a viable local population.

I've long wondered what mountain lion cubs look like. Never seen them.

Tom K.

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@madaboutcheetah:

 

The best place on earth to see pumas is Torres del Paine in Chilean Patagonia.

I have seen 7 different pumas in 8 observations in a 5 days safari.

If you are interested I could give you the contact of the guide who leads the tour, he leads many tour for the most famous agencies throughout the world.

 

He have also seen a puma in Berraco del Madidi, this was a really lucky sighting as pumas are really rarely seen in the wild in Amazonia.

 

~ @@jeremie

 

That's useful to know.

Thank you.

You've observed quite a few pumas in the wild!

Tom K.

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@Tom Kellie

 

Torres del Paine is just amazing for pumas. I still have to finish my TR but I need to edit all the pictures I took in RAW first...

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Thanks a lot everyone for all the information.

 

@@jeremie - South America is definitely high on my list ........ Not anytime soon, I'm afraid. Will definitely get in touch with you whilst planning...... Thank You!!!

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@@madaboutcheetah

 

I'm from California and have been actively wildlife viewing here for many years now. Matter of fact, my "relaxation drive" is an early morning/evening drive in the mountains near my home (generally to the East, around San Benito County and Mt Hamilton). I've seen most "uncommon" mammals in my part of the state - Badger, Kit Fox, Bobcat, Mink, River Otter, Spotted Skunk, Beaver, etc. I keep in touch with birders and a photographer who knows a bunch of the ranchers out there (San Benito). People (ranchers, etc.) who live in those mountains are lucky if they see one mountain lion every two months. Usually it's a very brief sighting - one dashing away into dense cover. These cats are extremely elusive and know how to live near people without ever being seen. For example, a photographer I know (Brent Paull) does dozens of Bobcat photography trips in the hills just South of me every year, and sees ~80-100 Bobcats/year, but never a Mountain Lion. I've never seen a mountain lion, but not for lack of effort - I've driven remote roads in these areas at night dozens of times without any big cat sightings to show for it. :angry: You read about a lot of mountain lion sightings in Santa Cruz Mountains just because there are a lot of people there, not because lions are especially easy to see - as a general rule, the more remote you go, the better your chances of mountain lion sightings are. I live in the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains and one of my neighbors has seen a mountain lion in his backyard, but I haven't...

 

There are a couple better areas in the state, but not by much: I know a guy who saw 8 mountain lions in a year in Humboldt County (Northern CA) - he was surveying at night for owls on forest roads north of Klamath River near this place called Weitchpec, so on average a rate of 1 cat/1.5 months. Also, a friend told me that people he talked to at Mission San Antonio de Padua (E of Big Sur) see them roughly once a month around the mission and on Nacimiento-Ferguson Road (between the mission and the coast) while driving the roads at dawn and dusk. Even in this areas, sightings are generally very, very brief; you will need to get incredibly lucky to see one for a prolonged period of time, let alone get a daytime photograph. Sorry! I wish I could be of more help...

 

Outside of CA, Rocky Mountain NP in Colorado is supposedly good for them, but again you'd only have a realistic chance if you stayed for a considerable amount of time and drove park roads at night. For photography, I'd stick to Torres del Paine, or the Gran Chaco in Paraguay/Bolivia where you can see Jaguars too! :)

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Posted (edited)

Torres del Paine: 8 pumas in 5 days. Very long observations (3-4 hours for two different pumas). Eating dead guanacos, hunting... Amazing.

 

Here is the link to one new documentary about Torres del Paine and Chilean Patagonia on BBC (first episode out of three):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06dpmyr/patagonia-earths-secret-paradise-1-fire-and-ice

Rodrigo Moraga is a Chilean photograph (and one of my professors) as well as a famous puma tracker who lead the team at TDP.

 

If you are not resident in England, you can watch the documentary on chrome after installing this add on:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/unlimited-free-vpn-hola/gkojfkhlekighikafcpjkiklfbnlmeio?hl=es-419

Edited by jeremie
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Torres del Paine: 8 pumas in 5 days. Very long observations (3-4 hours for two different pumas). Eating dead guanacos, hunting... Amazing.

 

Here is the link to one new documentary about Torres del Paine and Chilean Patagonia on BBC (first episode out of three):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06dpmyr/patagonia-earths-secret-paradise-1-fire-and-ice

Rodrigo Moraga is a Chilean photograph (and one of my professor) as well as a famous puma tracker who lead the team at TDP.

 

If you are not resident in England, you can watch the documentary on chrome after installing this add on:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/unlimited-free-vpn-hola/gkojfkhlekighikafcpjkiklfbnlmeio?hl=es-419

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Posted (edited)

We have cougars / mountain lions in our local Southern California mountains. They are occasionally spotted locally and our neighborhoods in the foothills have mountain lion warnings. Here's an article from a local newspaper in May. http://www.sgvtribune.com/environment-and-nature/20160531/watch-this-mountain-lion-and-her-kittens-play-in-the-san-gabriel-mountains

 

Last year, less than mile from my house: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-mountain-lion-san-dimas-streets-20151108-story.html

Edited by AmyT

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Lucky father and son out fishing saw a pair of mountain lions swimming at Lake Shasta in California, about 4 hours' drive north of where I live in Northern California! Luckily for us, they got video:

 

https://www.thedodo.com/swimming-mountain-lions-video-2097584374.html

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@@madaboutcheetah

 

Hari

I was very lucky to see a Florida Panther in Kissimmee Florida about 10 years ago.

We were playing golf on a course that has huge areas of wetlands. It was relatively early in the morning and the Panther (sub species of the Cougar) was stalking a Heron but had a narrow miss. We watched the Panther for about a minute but unfortunately I did not bring a camera.

Considering that there are less than 200 Florida Panthers in the wild it was an extremely Lucky sighting.

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