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Abena

Birds of Ghana

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@@Tom Kellie

 

This is the pangolin video from a host site other than flickr. It is nowhere near good quality but does show the serpentine look of its tail as it moves through the trees. Hope this works...let me know if you are unable to view.

 

https://vimeo.com/86999777

 

 

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Posted (edited)

@@Tom Kellie

 

This is the pangolin video from a host site other than flickr. It is nowhere near good quality but does show the serpentine look of its tail as it moves through the trees. Hope this works...let me know if you are unable to view.

 

https://vimeo.com/86999777

 

~ @@ovenbird

 

CRAZY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Yes, I could watch that video. The sounds of camera shutters and comments on the tail added to the sense of being there.

What a FANTASTIC sighting!

The wonderful aspect of the video clip is that the pangolin pauses long enough for everyone to obtain clear shots, then it sinuously moves along the tree branch.

Never, ever, have I seen anything even remotely like that.

I truly love the video, and will bring it to the attention of students who might likely appreciate it.

Two aspects surprised me.

• 1) The pangolin is smaller than I'd have expected.

• 2) It moves languidly with a sort of slow grace, not unlike a large snake.

Posting this video is a service to Safaritalk members, as it's an exceptionally fine sighting.

With Greatest Appreciation,

Tom K.

Edited by Tom Kellie
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@@Tom Kellie

 

Thank you for your kind thoughts. It certainly was a special experience for us and I'm glad we were able to document and share it.

 

Oops, I forgot to include camera info.

 

Dave used a Canon EOS 7D with a Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens at 1/125s, f6.5, 1250 ISO, -1/3 exposure bias. I'm pretty sure he did not use an extender and it is cropped quite a bit.

 

The video was taken with my P&S, a Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS20. Quite a big difference in quality but I refuse to carry anything bigger or heavier! Plus I imagine it was similar to being in a rugby scrum...lots of jostling going on!

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Fantastic image of the pangolin, lovely birds too! :)

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OH wow!!!! The pangolin is very special! What time of day did you see it? It seems like timing is everything to see birds and other wildlife too. EXCELLENT to see people interested in what Ghana has to offer in the way of birding and now I'll be searching for the elusive pangolin myself :ph34r: I may have a new favorite animal :P

 

Kakum NP is cool but I think that Bunso Arboretum has as much or more to offer, including decent looking lodging and a guide experienced in birding who will take groups out before dawn. Anyone who wants to visit Ghana I'd be happy to help with arrangements.

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OH wow!!!! The pangolin is very special! What time of day did you see it? It seems like timing is everything to see birds and other wildlife too. EXCELLENT to see people interested in what Ghana has to offer in the way of birding and now I'll be searching for the elusive pangolin myself :ph34r: I may have a new favorite animal :P

 

Kakum NP is cool but I think that Bunso Arboretum has as much or more to offer, including decent looking lodging and a guide experienced in birding who will take groups out before dawn. Anyone who wants to visit Ghana I'd be happy to help with arrangements.

 

~ @@Abena

 

Very nice to read your comments again!

What you've mentioned about Bunso Arboretum sounds very interesting.

Tom K.

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Sorry for the diversion...getting back on topic this is one of our favorite birds we saw in Ghana. While on a night drive in Mole NP we spotted what appeared to be 3 birds fluttering through the headlights. They landed on the road and this is what we actually saw...a Standard-winged Nightjar. A very cool bird and the one we were looking for...success!

 

 

large.jpg

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@@Abena

 

Bunso Arboretum sounds interesting...I'll have to do some research!

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Sorry for the diversion...getting back on topic this is one of our favorite birds we saw in Ghana. While on a night drive in Mole NP we spotted what appeared to be 3 birds fluttering through the headlights. They landed on the road and this is what we actually saw...a Standard-winged Nightjar. A very cool bird and the one we were looking for...success!

 

~ @@ovenbird

 

I've never seen any nightjar in my life, and never heard of a Standard-winged Nightjar.

When I first saw your fine image, it wasn't clear what I was seeing.

After looking up more information it became clear what a special species it is.

Is it correct that it's exclusively the male, and solely during breeding season, which sports the elongated wing feathers?

In any case, a rare image which is so much appreciated!

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie

 

Yes, I believe you are correct re it's the male and only in breeding plumage. There is a very good youtube video of a bird looking like 3 birds flying but unfortunately I'm unable to figure out how to get it to play here. Sorry.

 

 

 

 

 

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@@Tom Kellie

 

Yes, I believe you are correct re it's the male and only in breeding plumage. There is a very good youtube video of a bird looking like 3 birds flying but unfortunately I'm unable to figure out how to get it to play here. Sorry.

 

~ @@ovenbird

 

No problem about the video. After living here for 16 years, I'm accustomed to not being able to see videos.

Thank you for confirming that it was indeed a male in breeding plumage.

That underscores what a truly remarkable sighting and photo it was.

One needed to be there in the right season and find a male, which is what you did.

One of the most exquisite bird species I've seen in Safaritalk.

Tom K.

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HI everyone,

 

I'm back in Ghana now, after four months in the US working on business marketing efforts. Now I'm here working to develop a sewing cooperative. I'm pursuing a work permit/legal residency here in Ghana and plan to be here (other than visits home) for some time to come. I'm looking forward to posting more bird photos :-) @@ovenbird and @@Tom Kellie, if things go to plan I'll be getting out and about to do some birding and general wildlife viewing and will be posting photos. And you will always be welcome here in Ghana! (that goes for everyone of course :-) )

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HI everyone,

 

I'm back in Ghana now, after four months in the US working on business marketing efforts. Now I'm here working to develop a sewing cooperative. I'm pursuing a work permit/legal residency here in Ghana and plan to be here (other than visits home) for some time to come. I'm looking forward to posting more bird photos :-) @@ovenbird and @@Tom Kellie, if things go to plan I'll be getting out and about to do some birding and general wildlife viewing and will be posting photos. And you will always be welcome here in Ghana! (that goes for everyone of course :-) )

 

~ @@Abena

 

It's a JOY to welcome your return to Ghana and to Safaritalk.

Your posts from Ghana were fascinating as were your local Ghanaian bird and wildlife images.

Your commitment to develop a sewing cooperative is the sort of selfless initiative which makes the Earth a better place for all.

As the sewing cooperative's product line develops, please be sure to let us know about it, in order that we might support it.

With Gladness,

Tom K.

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White-throated Bee Eater (Merops allbicolis)

 

According to Wikipedia, "The white-throated bee-eater (Merops albicollis) is a near passerine bird in the bee-eater family Meropidae. It breeds in semi-desert along the southern edge of the Sahara, Africa. The white-throated bee-eater is migratory, wintering in a completely different habitat in the equatorial rainforests of Africa from southern Senegal to Uganda."

 

I saw a small flock of about six of these bee eaters at the Aburi Botanical Gardens last Sunday. This isn't the clearest photo in the world but I thought it was worth posting anyhow.

 

Thanks again to @@Tom Kellie for identification!

 

gallery_17433_1229_838694.jpg

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~ @@Abena

 

Your return to posting Ghanaian bird images here is definitely highly welcomed.

As nearly all Safaritalk African bird images are from southern or eastern Africa, your addition of West African avian species is a plus.

Whenever any other species perch within view, please do share the images with us!

Tom K.

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Here's another one - I've seen this guy/gal hanging around where I'm living now and was lucky enough to have it hold still so I could get some photos. This looks to me like a Blue-Breasted Kingfisher (Halcyon malimbica). I could identify it as a Kingfisher and went from there on the internet. The blue breast patch is not too noticeable, but perhaps this is a juvenile. Interestingly, this is a forest kingfisher and eats things other than fish like insects, arthropods, frogs and even the palm oil fruit! Quite a character too. I love the "what are YOU looking at" look of the middle photo!

 

gallery_17433_1229_3264329.jpg

gallery_17433_1229_2047478.jpggallery_17433_1229_4872832.jpg

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@@Abena

 

I am not 100% sure but I think it is a Woodland Kingfisher

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hi @@mvecht! Thanks for the suggestion - I like this description of the Woodland's vocalization from Wikipedia: "The call of this noisy kingfisher is a loud trill sounding like a nail run down the teeth of a comb." I shall have to listen for that! I'm sure I heard it calling the other morning but I'll need to pay closer attention. The two birds look very similar but the Blue Breasted is larger. Looking at a photo of the Woodland, I see that it has less black on the wings and no blue on the breast and the bird I photographed did not appear to have blue on the breast. I'd love to capture this bird in flight!

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@@Abena To be honest I looked at my book and cannot see that this fits any that are pictured there. (Birds of Africa, South of the Sahara)

 

It is like the woodland but no blue head. In my books the blue breasted is very pale blue, not the vivid blue of the woodland, and has a back back, so still does not quite match yours.

 

Lets call in an expert ? @@inyathi can you help with this bird in Ghana or are there any others out there who know the birds in Western Africa

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@@wilddog

 

Not all Woodland Kingfishers have blue on the head but rather grey which is why they can be confused with the Mangrove Kingfisher that by the way is not found in Ghana.

If you check the Pictures available on Google you will see plenty of birds with grey heads.

 

From my information there are 12 possible species in Ghana and the Woodland Kingfisher is the only one that fits the Pictures.

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Ok. Thanks for clarifying.

 

I saw the Mangrove one and had noted it is not in that area, hence not mentioning it in my post.

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Yes this is definitely a woodland kingfisher, the blue-breasted which is a Central and West African species and I assume reasonably common in Ghana is a bit larger than the woodland but the main obvious distinguishing feature is that the very dark blue on the wings extends right across the back, in the last photo you can clearly see this is not the case, This bird has a bright/light blue back that means that of the 5 Halcyon kingfishers that occur in Ghana it can only be the woodland Halcyon senegalensis if you type blue-breasted kingfisher in to Google and click images you will see the difference. In the first photo you can't see the birds back however the black eye stripe on the blue-breasted extends behind the eye and if you zoom in on the photo you can see that on this bird it doesn't.

 

@@Abena in case you don't have this book here is a link to the Birds of Ghana where you can see the difference.

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Thanks everyone for clarification on the species! Birds of Ghana looks like the field guide to have!

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I'm still just fascinated that there are species of inland kingfishers that feed on things other than fish - even palm oil fruits! I'm still waiting to see this bird again and hopefully hear its vocalization, which sounds very distinct for the Woodland Kingfisher.

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I'm still just fascinated that there are species of inland kingfishers that feed on things other than fish - even palm oil fruits! I'm still waiting to see this bird again and hopefully hear its vocalization, which sounds very distinct for the Woodland Kingfisher.

 

~ @@Abena

 

I share your sense of wonder.

The diversity of birds is a source of immense pleasure.

Growing up, I too thought of kingfishers as being exclusively fish-eaters.

I feel fortunate to have lived long enough to outgrow my skewed preconceptions.

Your active posting on this thread is a delight!

Tom K.

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