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Must have field guides.


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#21 Tom Kellie

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:16 PM

 

Estes' 'The Safari Companion' or 'The Behaviour Guide to African Mammals' is big but excellent.


"The Safari Companion" is my choice, as well. Not terribly useful for identification but indispensable if you want to understand more about behavior of animals you might see.

 

 

~ @Marks:

 

That sounds valuable, as I often would like to grasp what I've observed.

 

First I've heard of it — thanks for the reference.

 

Tom K.


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#22 Tom Kellie

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:20 PM

I wouldn't be without The Kingdon Pocket Guide to African Mammals by Jonathan Kingdon.

 

It covers the whole of Africa but its small so easily transportable and despite being small it's packed with information including distribution maps excellent colour illustrations and includes a bewildering number of the smaller species such as bats, shrews, squirrels as well.

 

 

~ @Caracal:

 

What you've written is also how I feel about it.

 

The Kingdon Pocket Guide to African Mammals sits to the left of my desk for regular consultation when post-processing safari images.

 

Two weeks ago I read it over several days, during breaks between classes and lunch hours. I learned so much, especially subtleties about various species.

 

Tom K.


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#23 Tom Kellie

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:25 PM

I really like GAME RANGER IN YOUR BACKPACK for its thorough imformation given in a easy to understand way , and its selective but still broad coverage of mammals, trees,birds and reptiles

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO:

 

That sounds like a book of interest.

 

As there are information and search engine restrictions in place here, I haven't been able to find anything about the book.

 

Is it in print?

 

Does it primarily cover South Africa, or might it also have information of value for one who travels in Kenya?

 

Tom K.



#24 Tom Kellie

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 07:04 AM

I really like GAME RANGER IN YOUR BACKPACK for its thorough imformation given in a easy to understand way , and its selective but still broad coverage of mammals, trees,birds and reptiles

 

~ @COSMIC RHINO

 

After having read this book, I wholeheartedly agree.

 

It's a fine introduction to ecological realities, which surprised and pleased me.

 

Tom K.



#25 ellenhighwater

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:10 PM

Two Oceans: A Guide to the Marine Life of Southern Africa by G. M. Branch

Really great field guide for divers and beach combers.

 
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#26 armchair bushman

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 05:53 AM

Along similar lines,  I am quite fond of my copy of " A Guide to the Seashores of Eastern Africa and Western Indian Ocean Islands".  The copy I have is a newer edition than what is shown here in this link: http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/916304594X

While the scope of a single field guide sized book could NEVER cover all the biodiversity in a biome (especially Marine), it covers the most commonly encountered/conspicuous features and species - everything from corals to sea grasses, from whales to sea stars, from shorebirds to inter-tidal spiders.

 

Sometimes ecosystem/biome field guides are nicer than Class (birds, mammals, etc.) based field guides.


Edited by armchair bushman, 22 October 2015 - 05:55 AM.

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#27 Tom Kellie

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Posted 27 October 2015 - 12:32 AM

Along similar lines,  I am quite fond of my copy of " A Guide to the Seashores of Eastern Africa and Western Indian Ocean Islands".  The copy I have is a newer edition than what is shown here in this link: http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/916304594X

While the scope of a single field guide sized book could NEVER cover all the biodiversity in a biome (especially Marine), it covers the most commonly encountered/conspicuous features and species - everything from corals to sea grasses, from whales to sea stars, from shorebirds to inter-tidal spiders.

 

Sometimes ecosystem/biome field guides are nicer than Class (birds, mammals, etc.) based field guides.

 

~ @armchair bushman

 

That's very nice of you to mention the value of ecologically-focused field guides.

 

They frequently are overlooked, despite their tremendous interpretive value.

 

Species live within a biological context, which shapes their responses to ongoing change.

 

Thank you for putting in a positive word for such field guides.

 

Tom K.


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#28 armchair bushman

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 01:20 PM

I have just bought myself "Upland Kenya Wildflowers and Ferns" (3rd and most recent Edition) by A.D.Q. Agnew.  I'm excited about it as I've wanted it for a long time.  It comes with a key at the beginning of the book as well as lesser keys at the beginning of each family.

Unfortunately, the colour on the cover image is a little deceptive, as all the illustrated plates are black and white only.

It also covers most grasses, sedges, and reeds, which are otherwise very UNDER-REPRESENTED in all other botanical guides for the region.

 

http://www.natureken...owers-and-ferns



#29 Soukous

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 02:21 PM

I think that I've just decided that my 'must have' field guide is @armchair bushman :D


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"if you think you're too small to make a difference, try spending the night in a closed room with a mosquito."

Martin Dunn FRGS

 

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#30 Tom Kellie

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 05:55 PM

I think that I've just decided that my 'must have' field guide is @armchair bushman :D

 

~ @Soukous

 

His list of ‘works cited’ and ‘references’ would be a treasure.

 

From experience I know that he's even more delightfully informative in person than in Safaritalk posts.

 

Tom K.


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#31 Sverker

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:39 AM

Jonathan Kingdon: I recently bought his field guide. Some impressions.

 

The good:

Text is very good, there is a lot to learn.

Maps, often recent and historical distributions.

 

The bad:

Paintings sometimes depict the animals in rather strange movements - in situations that you never see them.

 

The sad:

In the "Status" section, one can see how many animals are hunted to the brink of extinction or that their environments are destroyed.


Edited by Sverker, 28 November 2015 - 09:40 AM.

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Slower is better!

#32 Tom Kellie

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 12:14 AM

~ @Sverker

 

Thank you for this review.

 

I've read the Kingdon Pocket Guide to African Mammals, which I found helpful.

 

As I'd wondered about his larger, more complete field guide, your review is useful.

 

When I'm passing through the OR Tambo Airport in Johannesburg next month, I'll look for it in the bookstores there. They stock a larger selection of field guides than I might have expected.

 

Sorry to hear about the information presented in the “Status” section.

 

Tom K.







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