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Safaritalk Issue 3. January 2015


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#21 Brendan Harding

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 11:04 AM

Well, that's my evening sorted. Looking forward to sitting back and reading all the latest news from the world of Safaritalk.

Many thanks for everything Matt.

 

Brendan


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#22 Marks

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 04:28 PM

If you've read the mag, loved it, hated it, have suggestions, don't be afraid to say so. I can't do it without your input.
 
Matt.


Loved it. Especially enjoyed the interview with John Hanks, the honey badger spread, @Whyone?'s Mana article, & @pault's Uganda piece. I am consistently amazed at the quality of the contributions of ST members, as well as the access to professionals that Matt manages to obtain. I do think the magazine would benefit from an editor's pen for some minor grammatical and sentence structure irregularities, but that's really the only improvement I could suggest.

 

"Postcards from '60s Uganda" deserves a special mention for being especially suited to the magazine format. The postcards themselves are very attractively designed. Also, some of the hot air balloon photos are breathtaking.

 

Great job, @Game Warden and all contributors.



#23 Game Warden

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 01:41 AM

I think I spotted a glaring mistake...

 

Page 24-25 Jackal cub instead of pup? 


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#24 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 04:36 AM

GW, great magazine... Finally got around to reading it.

 

Loved the interview with Calvin....... Our own @pault and his gorilla trekking article was a gem too ..........


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#25 Atravelynn

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 04:21 PM

The lion had that honey badger in its jaws.  It must taste awful.  Lucky for the honey badger.  Quite the sequence and the honey badger's reputation as a fierce fighter is enhanced as it lives to fiercely fight another day!  Very cool.


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#26 Richard Trillo

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 11:16 PM

Very impressive Matt, again. Congratulations!

 

I've just read Calvin Cottar's piece, the excellent and revealing interview with James Sengeney and the piece by Riz Jiwa from Hot Air Safaris (sounds like we chose the right company to start working with!). I'm going to want to refer back to it – I know that. 

 

On Calvin's arguments, I'm an instinctive softie. My adult kids are now all vegetarians and increasingly vegan and I think a change in our treatment of animals will be one of those historical watersheds that future generations will look back on, like the abolition of slavery, and wonder how their ancestors ever supported it. So I'm inclined to argue with him about the commodification of wildlife, but I can intellectually see his points. I would like to see him going head to head in a two-way discussion, alternating paragraphs in an email exchange, which you could then publish, with someone very committed on the other side of the debate, like Paula Kahumbu or Richard Leakey.

 

Great to hear about James Sengeney's Mara background – the possible first arrival of the Serengeti migration in the 1970s (wow, I had no idea, but he seems to be saying it might have been coming back for the first time in years), and the different characer of the Loita wildies. The threat to that migration seems very real. 


Edited by Richard Trillo, 09 January 2015 - 11:16 PM.

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#27 Calvin

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 04:04 AM

Good points Richard Trillo.. Happy to go head to head with both Richard and Paula, and actually have just done so when they both were at my camp for a 2 day session interviewing with graham boynton for Newsweek.. I worked for Richard in the 90's remember..and our mission? Commoditizing wildlife through the user rights program, the devolution of control of wildlife to landowners through the district wildlife forums, and the proper functioning of a problem animal control unit to shoot problem elephants - he is no stranger to anything I say here. . Richard is all for the localization of the control of wildlife in the context that they should be allowed to either use it, or remove it if its not productive , and totally against state compensation for wildlife damages. He understands that the landowners are the real deciders of wildlife's fate . He is pragmatic and realistic. And Paula was shocked when he made this clear to her in front of graham and I. I fully understand that Richard can't be telling two opposing sides of this emotive subject at the same time (I.e. stop trading ivory to the world audience while promoting sale of zebra skins locally..) and Richard has gone the way of the bigger ivory ban picture in his public statements..this is where he feels most can be gained for now, and is where Paula is entirely focused. But always we come back to the point - assuming That the punitive / prohibition measures work and we stablished or even increase elephant and wildlife populations, what size of a problem are we creating while our human population is increasing at 3.5% to 80 million in 2030 with decreasing land availability for wildlife for growing food ? Wildlife causing 15% lost production in agriculture will not be tolerated - unless the wildlife is the primary contributor of revenues to rural people, and how do we do that without commoditization or a new leasing system? If we don't do these, we are just setting ourselves up for a massive purge of wildlife one way or the other. In actual fact, with most wildlife species here in Kenya, this is not an issue as it's being removed at a rate of 4% per annum by normal people..but elephant? No this population is stable and growing in Kenya as per recent counts and statements from the Director KWS (though its population is being skewed from selective poaching) and therefore is heading for state sponsored removal in the future - there is a point at which the political costs stemming from the actual costs of elephant just get too high, and the elephants have to go, and international pressure will not make a difference in bees decisions unless it is willing to pay for them to remain - through leasing the land. Conservationists have to devise ways to make the animal itself valuable ( commoditization) or the land they live on valuable ( leasing, easements etc) or Elephant will not have a future on most of their rangelands in Kenya...Dr Richard Leakey is way too smart to not know all this, and I await with anticipation his next evolution in wildlife thinking.
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#28 Calvin

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 05:33 AM

On the issue of vegetarianism and the new modern way to treat animals, its a great idea but entirely irrelevant in most if the less developed world, a luxury only possible in the rich developed world of which there are pockets in much of the undeveloped world. try telling a Maasai not to kill his goat for his lunch, or a San bushman not to arrow a hare, or an ituri Pygmy to not eat a monkey and he will laugh at you because he has no other option, right now. And to feed everyone in the world on vegetables only - while being a nice morally evolved idea to many in the developed world - would most likely result in more loss if biodiversity and natural ecosystems - encouraging the fragmentation , deforestation and fencing of land. Conservationists need to struck a balance and put aside personal preferences for the bigger picture. The facts are, wildlife is a renewable, environmentally adapted producer of protein and has additional a distract values that can not only keep people alive, but can pay its way and justify its future in the human dominated world. And here's the catch; it cannot pay its way without money changing hands.

If the developed world are not willing to but the trillions of dollars they have available in disposable income and savings towards paying African landowners to keep wildlife on their land, then accept that most wildlife and biodiversity will be lost to land use change. Or accept the powers of market driven supply and demand wildlife industry to work to secure wildlife and secure food and income for poor rural people.
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#29 Calvin

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 05:51 AM

Excuse the auto correction spelling mistakes folks - I hope you get my points clearly enough but ask for clarification if not..
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#30 KageraSafaris

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 02:56 PM

Thanks Matt for working on this Jan issue - I have enjoyed reading through especially stories about Uganda I could relate to. Great work



#31 Game Warden

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 03:09 PM

Thank you again everyone. Taking everything onboard. Do feel free to message me, (rather than post publicly), with suggestions to content for future articles. Already got a few new regular slots in mind :)


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#32 Richard Trillo

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 11:18 PM

Calvin I think I agree with most of your follow-up points in your posts here. The Mara ecosystem conservancies have been a huge success in their own terms, not that they've had an easy ride from Somalia challenges, internal corruption and lethargy and lack of GOK support for tourism.  And there are new conservancies springing up all the term in Laikipia, Ukambani, NRT in the north. If that's commodification I'm all for it.

 

In fact I'm not sure if I disagree with any of the substantive points in your article. I can't see any rational argument against controlled hunting, though I think for elephants and rhinos, legal hunting and particularly any return to a legal trade in ivory and rhino horn, would result in extinction in the wild (it's beginning to become a moot point what that means any more) within our lifetimes. For most species, while I would never want to pull the trigger unless I needed to eat the beast, keeping numbers in check seems to make sense. One thing I need educating on that I know is dear to your heart: the private ownership of the wildlife on a person's land. How does that work without every parcel fenced and wildlife movements severely circumscribed? Isn't that a blind alley for wildlife conservation?

 

The veggie thing is a quite different topic, not really for here, but there is no way to argue that meat-eating on the industrial scale practiced in NAmerica and Europe has any kind of future in a sustainable world. As I understand it, climate change is seriously exacerbated by livestock emissions (methane farts being massively more damaging than CO2 emissions) and Kenyan wildlife is suffering through climate change as much as any. Remember Amboseli and Tsavo West's horrific drought in 2010? Most Kenyans are largely vegetarian already - too poor to eat meat very often – but it's surely the cattle and goat lands in Kenya that are competing for space with wildlife, *in wildlife areas* more than the shambas in the highlands and the west where the megafauna disappeared decades ago. Even though it's shamba/elephant conflict that makes the biggest stories in the Kenyan press. 


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#33 steventheface

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Posted 26 July 2015 - 11:41 PM

Great article and really good to hear the points put forward by Calvin Cottar. Something has to change regarding the use of the land before its too late to make the changes.

 

Really enjoyed the magazine and I'll be spreading the word.

 

great work Matt.







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