Soukous

Rhino horn demand in Vietnam drops by more than 33% in one year

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Efforts to curb the deadly trade in rhino horn appear to be gaining traction, with a poll finding that demand for the animal part in Vietnam has dropped by more than a third over the past year.

 

After a year-long public information campaign in Vietnam, only 2.6% of people in the Asian country now continue to buy and use rhino horn, a decrease of 38%.

Importantly, there has been a 25% decrease in the number of people who think rhino horn, which is made of the same material as fingernails and hair, has medicinal value. However, 38% of Vietnamese still think it can treat diseases such as cancer and rheumatism.

 

read the full article in The Guardian here

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here is some good news at last, hoping that this means lower overall demand ,rather than a geographic horn sales switch

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Great news, but I remain a sceptic, it is only a "poll" and It most certainly hasn't translated into a reduction of poaching.

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Do you think it will affect poaching levels? Or the stocks being held in Vietnam?

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things would be a whole lot more confincing in the sth african govt actually relased the text of its environmental MOU'S with china,vietnam and mozambique.

 

with the appauling level of poaching have the environment minister lead the rhino and elephant march is grossly inapporiate. she deserves to be at the back

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This is positive news, thank you for posting @@Soukous. Hopefully, this is indicative of a gradual change in attitude by those who have/would likely be users of horn.

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I also wonder about just how much of the "rhino horn" is nothing but worthless powder. I'm happy to hear some good news for a change.

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Do you think it will affect poaching levels? Or the stocks being held in Vietnam?

 

Now here is something I have heard a number of times. Are there really stocks being held in Vietnam?

 

If there are, its an indication that the market is controlled by the suppliers. This means that the market is finite, as some stock is able to be held back from the market.

 

I hope this report is true, or at least accurate. If it is, then there will be a drop in poaching, and there hasn't been.

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Reduce of demand for rhino horn is a good thing. Less people want to use rhino horn more time to recover rhino populations from poaching crisis.

Last Friday our private rhino sanctuary (note- we have two properties – rhino breeding operation and rhino sanctuary) lost three rhinos to poaching.

The resent studies show clearly that it’s not the demand for horn that kills our rhinos but the method by which horn is supplied for the trade. Illegal trade kills rhinos and people of Africa due to poaching activities when legal trade could offer supply of horn via harvesting, where rhino stays alive and breed more rhinos, while horn grows back.

The current international law bans ONLY legal supply of horn. It failed for decades to ban Illegal trade, which results in more and more rhino poaching incidents.

The change of law is the key to change the future of rhino.

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Posted (edited)

The poll may or may not be valid. I hope it is.

 

There is an economic slowdown (or more like a settling down from a panic-stricken money printing by the Asian governments in 2008-2009) in Asia. Luxury goods items are down significantly in Asia (most notably China).

 

The problem is that ivory and rhino horn are being stockpiled by the middlemen, who are only used to ever-increasing prices (a bubble). It will take a sustained level of weak demand to break those middlemen. Only then, in my opinion, will you see poaching levels diminish.

Edited by Safaridude
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Correct, If middlemen are banking rhino horn, then they will quickly get nervous should there be a drop in demand. Imagine how nervous they will be is a sustained legal supply of horn becomes available. If they are able to "bank" horn then the market is smaller than we thought in the first place.

 

For this information to be correct, the control poll which they did is as valuable as the recent poll. I hope there is some truth in this, and if there is we should see a drop in poaching by early next year.

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I found these (2 year old) videos on youtube.. Damian Mander "Damned if you do damned if you don't" Unfortunately I can only find 3 of the 5 part series. But it is worth watching.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeV7YV0y-Lg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qL96jmKqVaQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJrqwnrQQDA

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There is actually a whole lot of fake horn on the market.

 

whatever is done the poaching stay up

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Posted (edited)

On 18 October 2014 at 6:04 PM, Albina Hume said:

Reduce of demand for rhino horn is a good thing. Less people want to use rhino horn more time to recover rhino populations from poaching crisis.

Last Friday our private rhino sanctuary (note- we have two properties – rhino breeding operation and rhino sanctuary) lost three rhinos to poaching.

The resent studies show clearly that it’s not the demand for horn that kills our rhinos but the method by which horn is supplied for the trade. Illegal trade kills rhinos and people of Africa due to poaching activities when legal trade could offer supply of horn via harvesting, where rhino stays alive and breed more rhinos, while horn grows back.

The current international law bans ONLY legal supply of horn. It failed for decades to ban Illegal trade, which results in more and more rhino poaching incidents.

The change of law is the key to change the future of rhino.

Hi Albina this is Hamed from Saudi. I do really like all of your comments. 

 

Edited by twaffle

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