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sugarpond

Who Want To Shoot An Elephant?

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What are the hunters doing to stop the poaching?

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When was the article published? @@sugarpond you mention it was recent but I can't see a date on it. The article points out that

 

In September 2013, a ban on elephant hunting goes into effect in Botswana, making the Waldrips’ hunt one of the last legal kills.

 

 

and it mentions them arriving in July so I guess it was probably July 2013.

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I can remember meeting two American elephant hunters in August 2013 who claimed that they were there to do elephant "research". When I say them going through customs, and saw the female customs official checking their rifles, and ammo I felt shocked. Then at Tuba Tree Camp, I meet a German hunter who said that the hunters should have access to hunting the elephants in Chobe National Park, and felt shocked. Everyone will agree tnat Chobe National Park is overpopulated with elephants, and that they are having destroying the land, but can't nature simply be allowed to take it's course?

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Posted (edited)

They can want to hunt and keep wanting ............ but, for the time being hunting is BANNED in all of Botswana.

 

Off-topic - last week in the news, the ex-king of Spain's recent rendezvous in Botswana came back to bite him in the a$$ ......... literally!!!! ;)

Edited by madaboutcheetah
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We all know very well how elephants are such incredibly sensitive animals which have mental capacities that even humans don't have. How can any sentient person want to kill one to put it's head on a wall?

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They can want to hunt and keep wanting ............ but, for the time being hunting is BANNED in all of Botswana.

 

Off-topic - last week in the news, the ex-king of Spain's recent rendezvous in Botswana came back to bite him in the a$$ ......... literally!!!! ;)

Seeing him hobble around with his walking stick was poetic justice!
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Yes, it was because the Spanish public was simply outraged by the King's elephant hunt, he looked awful.

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Yes, it was because the Spanish public was simply outraged by the King's elephant hunt, he looked awful.

 

They were more outraged because Spain was going through the worst financial crisis and highest levels of unemployment when he was using State money to fund his exotic Elephant hunting .........

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When was the article published? @@sugarpond you mention it was recent but I can't see a date on it. The article points out that

 

In September 2013, a ban on elephant hunting goes into effect in Botswana, making the Waldrips’ hunt one of the last legal kills.

 

 

and it mentions them arriving in July so I guess it was probably July 2013.

I think it was the issue before the current issue. It says "one of the last elephant hunts in Botswana" but I think it was published late last month.

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I naively believed that the mainstream press had long lost interest in glorifying hunters, in particular great white hunters. This article represents a step backwards.

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How can anyone get pleasure out of shooting an Elephant just for the fun of it. I saw a photo of a hunter knelt down next to a tiny DikDik,he was grinning from ear to ear,he looked like he had achieved something great,made me feel sick.

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Please I can't believe many of the animals which hunters shoot just for the pleasure of it: civets, genets, etc. How often are hunters ever killed or injured by their prey today? Let's face it-it's incredibly rare, and in all probability it's only going to become less, and less common.

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I would love the opportunity to shoot an elephant,..........................................................Through the lens of a camera.

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while i do not personally hunt i have seen the difference hunting outfits on private concessions can make in west and central africa ( have worked on the continent since 2008 - chad, cameroon, equatorial guinea and DRC ). Private outfits generate investment in upstream/downstream economic enterprises at local levels. Not sure how many people have ever visited an abattoir from the factory farms to the feedpens to the meat preparation but not sure how its any more " humane " or " less sadistic " than a bullet. An animal hunted provides meat to local community. It generates govt revenues which encourages infrastructure development that the continent needs and employment at the local level ( esp former poachers ). We create a public perception of species ie ellies -anthropomorphizing them as an effective public awareness campaign but it does nothing to speak to a much bigger relevant picture. The trigger response is emotional and not logical.

 

the continent is an urbanized developing one. economic progress and YOY growth is reality. Yes, the unique megafauna is beautiful. Hunting much like tourism has its place. The reality for the countries ive worked in is bushmeat and illegal logging/fishing by locals is a MUCH bigger issue than hunting will ever be.

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@@wenchy

 

One of the main problems in these discussion is that people look at the situation in Botswana, Tanzania or Zambia and think it is the same everywhere in Africa, hence the sweeping statements. Instead, as you say, it is true that trophy hunters are at the forefront of protecting remaining wildlife in many West and Central African countries, where there is no or very limited ecotourism and the only alternative to trophy hunting is massive poaching and/or loss of habitat to agriculture or other human activities.

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Paolo you're undoubtedly correct,however, most of us can only think about how the number of forest elephants has diminished so drastically to therefore any amount of hunting will cut their already limited numbers still further. Besides the trophy hunters continue to shooting rare species.

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@@optig

 

I may be wrong, but the only country where you can still (legally) hunt forest elephants is Cameroon. When CAR stopped elephant hunting in 1984 there were still more than 60,000 elephants (they estimate they were 60,000 in 1986), now we might consider ourselves lucky if there are 3,000.

 

I agree with you that forest elephants should not be hunted under any circumstance.

 

However, if not for trophy hunters most wildlife that remains in many West and African countries would be totally gone by now. For instance, 50% of the annual budget of Pendjari NP in Benin is paid by the 70 or so hunters that hunt in the neighbouring hunting blocks each year; the Chinko Project, aimed at safeguarding a unique wild and biodiverse area in eastern CAR -uner the tutelage of, amongst others, J. Michael Fay - is operating thanks to a (very ethical) hunting operation.

 

So, unless we find other solutions (and I cannot see any in the current situation) trophy hunting is the one way we have in those areas to protect wildlife.

 

Obviously the situation in other countries in East and Southern Africa might be very different.

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