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Some Very Important General Trip Planning Advice (Disaster Prevention)


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28 replies to this topic

#21 Jochen

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 01:10 PM

- Disaster Prevention #2 - If you have purchased your airline ticket on-line -- with many, if not all airlines -- you are required to show the credit card that you paid your ticket with as you check in.  I am not sure what happens if you don't have the credit card with you, but you don't want to find out.

 

Been there. 

 

Our bank switched from Visa to Mastercard at one point, and sent us new cards. We forgot we had booked SAA tickets on the old one.

 

As we arrived at Jo'burg, we were asked to produce the old card, which obviously we couldn't. It's a very stupid rule; the seats are there, they are fully paid for, the names on the passports are correct, etc etc... but it is somewhere in the small print that you also have to prove you own the credit card. Honestly, I cannot understand why a consumer-organisation has not contested this rule yet.

 

Anyway, we were lucky that our bank was open on a saturday morning. They were able to send a fax to the SAA desk, which stated what happened with our cards.

 

If that would have failed, we'd be forced to buy our own seats a 2nd time. Go figure!



#22 pault

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 05:38 AM

With regards to $100 bill years, this is true in many countries outside of Africa.  I have been to many countries that will check this.  Not every country cares, but some do. And getting new bills is not always easy. If I get a new one I usually hang on to it, or I will inquire at the bank from time to time to get new ones and will the newest years on them.  As the US $100 bill recently changed again, now it has color on it, I am wondering how long it will be before these countries will only take the colored notes. 

 

Am I understanding correctly that in Kenya and Tanzania, small bills are preferred to larger ones?  So 1s, 5s, 10s, and 20s are ok??  Do they accept USD or we need to change to local currency?  Stupid question I know, but have never been to either of these countries. 

 

Yes, USD are fine, but it is easy to use local currency too as long as your ATM card is part of the Visa Plus system or similar.Don't use your credit card for ATM withdrawal unless you want to pay fees - but I guess that will be the case in Taiwan anyway. Arusha and Nairobi have many internationally-linked ATMs, as do the airports.

 

Where are you staying in Selous and Ruaha, and are you spending time anywhere else? Often Selous and Ruaha camps are all inclusive and so you will only be paying tips (if you want to). In that case as long as it is legal currency you don't need to worry about the size of the bill. For staff it is actually usually better in small camps to pay a single tip for all than small tips to each (again, if you want) so you don't need small bills for that. You may have to pay for meals in Arusha if you are staying there but unless you are at a small guest house, you can charge to your room and pay with large bills and they will have change (and probably a poor exchange rate, but it won't be much). The only reason you would need small bills is if you want to take a taxi and go somewhere to eat out, or have a drink or coffee on the street, or if you feel you need to tip drivers and porters in Arusha and if you want to shop (even then you can do this at the camps or at the large souvenir shopping malls in Arusha with large bills). I usually take my ATM card and USD 200 in smallish bills that I buy at the airport on the way out. 


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#23 madaboutcheetah

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:11 AM

As long as the USD bills are issued 2007 and later, I think you should be fine (100$ etc etc.,) ........ no need for small bills specifically, except for the examples cited above by Pault.


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#24 Pennyanne

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 08:19 PM

 

- Disaster Prevention #2 - If you have purchased your airline ticket on-line -- with many, if not all airlines -- you are required to show the credit card that you paid your ticket with as you check in.  I am not sure what happens if you don't have the credit card with you, but you don't want to find out.

 

Been there. 

 

Our bank switched from Visa to Mastercard at one point, and sent us new cards. We forgot we had booked SAA tickets on the old one.

 

As we arrived at Jo'burg, we were asked to produce the old card, which obviously we couldn't. It's a very stupid rule; the seats are there, they are fully paid for, the names on the passports are correct, etc etc... but it is somewhere in the small print that you also have to prove you own the credit card. Honestly, I cannot understand why a consumer-organisation has not contested this rule yet.

 

Anyway, we were lucky that our bank was open on a saturday morning. They were able to send a fax to the SAA desk, which stated what happened with our cards.

 

If that would have failed, we'd be forced to buy our own seats a 2nd time. Go figure!

 

This is a really strange rule. I  always buy my tickets online and have never yet been asked to show my credit card, however I don't think any North American Airlines require this.   I often buy tickets for my mother to come and visit us so of course she would never have the credit card used to pay for the ticket.  When travelling in other parts of the world I will be careful to make sure I carry the correct credit card.

 

Thanks for the warning.



#25 Vysakh R Nambiar

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 10:10 AM

There was a time when I bought a ticket from my card for my Dad and unfortunately they asked for the card. I had to email them my Photo ID Proof with a letter saying I was the one who booked the ticket for him. 

 

This was on a Kenya Airways flight out of Burundi. 

 

When I talked to the local office here, their explanation was, Kenya Airways alone have been losing money in 6 Digit USD figures to fraudulent transactions. The Modus Operandi is to book tickets a day or two before the date of travel, use the ticket and then initiate a chargeback. The tickets will be booked in a different name to that of the card holder. Technically Visa and Mastercard has a 30 days chargeback policy in most countries. 

 

A way around this is to use online money transfer from your bank for buying tickets or booking with a card that you can actually carry. It is also important that the card belongs to a person in the group. If you are gifting a trip to some one be sure to send an authorisation letter with them. That has your telephone number and a copy of your ID proof so that they don't have trouble at check in. 

 

 

 

 

- Disaster Prevention #2 - If you have purchased your airline ticket on-line -- with many, if not all airlines -- you are required to show the credit card that you paid your ticket with as you check in.  I am not sure what happens if you don't have the credit card with you, but you don't want to find out.

 

Been there. 

 

Our bank switched from Visa to Mastercard at one point, and sent us new cards. We forgot we had booked SAA tickets on the old one.

 

As we arrived at Jo'burg, we were asked to produce the old card, which obviously we couldn't. It's a very stupid rule; the seats are there, they are fully paid for, the names on the passports are correct, etc etc... but it is somewhere in the small print that you also have to prove you own the credit card. Honestly, I cannot understand why a consumer-organisation has not contested this rule yet.

 

Anyway, we were lucky that our bank was open on a saturday morning. They were able to send a fax to the SAA desk, which stated what happened with our cards.

 

If that would have failed, we'd be forced to buy our own seats a 2nd time. Go figure!

 

This is a really strange rule. I  always buy my tickets online and have never yet been asked to show my credit card, however I don't think any North American Airlines require this.   I often buy tickets for my mother to come and visit us so of course she would never have the credit card used to pay for the ticket.  When travelling in other parts of the world I will be careful to make sure I carry the correct credit card.

 

Thanks for the warning.

 


Edited by Vysakh R Nambiar, 30 July 2015 - 10:11 AM.

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#26 Koshy

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 06:29 AM

If you are planning a trip to India make a list of medicines that you may need. These include medication for Delhi Belly, Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) packs, for small injuries like sprain, cuts, shoe bites, etc. First Aid and so on. Good thing is, you can pick them at the Chemists in major towns easily and cheaper than what you might pay in Home country. Pick up sufficient quantity of toilet rolls on arrival as you might not find them in remote birding lodges or National Parks. India has different climate zones and depending upon your itinerary, pack appropriate clothes.


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#27 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 10:24 AM

  • how do you tell the issue date of USD notes , this is something I have no idea about ?
  • when you are going to a tented camp or lodge take everything you are likely to need , their shops have overpriced trinkets and t shirts with their name on it. there is no handy corner store, think practical it is a good idea to  spare shoe laces
  • tie shoes laces tight to avoid tripping over

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#28 Atravelynn

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 12:38 PM

 

  • how do you tell the issue date of USD notes , this is something I have no idea about ?  Fortunately there is a date printed.  Not very big, but it is there.
  • when you are going to a tented camp or lodge take everything you are likely to need , their shops have overpriced trinkets and t shirts with their name on it. there is no handy corner store, think practical it is a good idea to  spare shoe laces
  • tie shoes laces tight to avoid tripping over  Ouch!  Good idea.  While this might not be "disaster prevention" take a second pair of laces.  They weigh almost nothing and take up almost no room.

 


When you think of a rhino, think of a tree (African proverb)

#29 Atravelynn

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 12:40 PM

If you are planning a trip to India make a list of medicines that you may need. These include medication for Delhi Belly, Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) packs, for small injuries like sprain, cuts, shoe bites, etc. First Aid and so on. Good thing is, you can pick them at the Chemists in major towns easily and cheaper than what you might pay in Home country. Save enough to pay for your next trip! Pick up sufficient quantity of toilet rolls on arrival as you might not find them in remote birding lodges or National Parks.  If not a roll, I do make sure I have a sufficient supply of sheets.  Good idea!  India has different climate zones and depending upon your itinerary, pack appropriate clothes.


When you think of a rhino, think of a tree (African proverb)





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