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Do you drink the local water?


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30 replies to this topic

#21 owenshaffer

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 09:10 AM

I live in Nairobi and only drink bottled water. I do the same on all my safaris no matter where they are to. I've only drunk tap water in South Africa.

#22 Safari Cal

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:44 PM

For me, bottled water all the way for drinking.  

 

I once did an analysis of water stored in a tank, supplied from a borehole, at Archer's Post, Samburu and found it contained e.Coli and Fecal coliforms. :huh: The locals have built up such a resistance to all manner of bacteria that we can't compete with! 

 

 

In Nairobi I always used a potable water supplier for my home drinking water, the dispenser comes as part of the deal. I do brush my teeth in tap water though, eat salads - Kachumbari - how can I resist, and take the occasional bit of ice.

 

I've had terrible food poisoning in Mombasa but never on safari up country funnily enough.  Just remember to wash your hands 'every time' before you handle food and especially after you handle money!!!  It's hidden in the most peculiar places by people to deter thieves from finding it.  

 

Although on occasions I do think that the water supply get's the blame when the cause is something else entirely, why take the risk when you can remove it entirely for not a lot of extra cost. ;) 


Cal Kerr

 

“We all have our alloted portions of black and white paint; how we lay it on is a question of temperament.” 
― Ewart GroganFrom the Cape to Cairo: The First Traverse of Africa from South to North


#23 Whyone?

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 04:18 PM

Yep.

Out of the Zambezi, a few hours in the sun and then boiled.

Much to my astonishment no obvious after-effects to date.

#24 wilddog

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:45 PM

@Whyone?

 

Why ' a few hours in the sun' before boiling it? - Does this not increase the numbers of bacteria or does the light have a positive impact on the water? or is it just about allowing any sediment to settle?



#25 Whyone?

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 09:20 PM

No particular reason other than, as you say Linda, it lets the majority of the sediment settle to the bottom of the collection drums.

 

To be fair, the majority of the water we collect from the river gets used for washing & showering, cooking and tea / coffee.

 

Zambezi water is jolly 'soft' and its quite a job washing soap off because of this.



#26 wilddog

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 10:01 PM

Yes, I remember overdoing the shampoo while having a bucket shower and getting in a panic in case the water ran out before I could rinse it out.

 

Like you, we have also drunk boiled water from the river without any ill effect.



#27 Geoff

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 10:31 PM

Whilst backpacking I remember drinking water from a spring that had a strong sulphur smell. No ill effects. We also let it stand in the sun for a few hours which reduced the smell considerably. We had to wait in line too and let the ellies get their fill before we could get to the water.


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#28 Whyone?

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 06:37 AM

Bottled water isn't necessarily the safe option.

There has been a lot of coverage in the Zim press over the last few months of heavily contaminated bottled water which has been found on sale in major supermarkets in Zim and neighbouring countries

http://www.newsday.c...led-water-saga/

#29 samburumags

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:29 PM

Kenya is the only place where I never drink the water, but I have ice, I eat loads of salad and I do brush my teeth with it, no problems but I too always take Imodium because Malarone anti malarial can cause "the runs" and nobody wants that on safari!!!  I had it once between Nakuru and the Mara and that was NO JOKE ! That was the road trip not flying. OMG


But, in the gathering darkness, deep behind my soul, someone, something whispers "Africa"" (Mark Owens "Secrets of the Savannah")

#30 COSMIC RHINO

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 07:55 AM

@owenshaffer have you are anyone you know got sick from Nairobi tap water ?

 

In Kenya I have only  got that problem after fruit crumbles, but nothing else on a camping trip, and after salada at some Tsavo lodges.


Wild Africa is in my blood. All life is sacred and interconnected. for the animals are fellow nations caught in the splendor and trevail of the earth.


#31 ellenhighwater

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 09:14 PM

Funny people should mention how clean the Okavango Delta is.  While it looks pristine and filtered by all that gorgeous plantlife, agricultural and mining runoff is a massive problem in the delta and includes lovely stuff like DDT:

 

http://www.sewanee.e...hea-edwards.php

 

I drink treated tapwater.  Steripens are awesome and convenient and I'm not contributing to all the plastic on the side of the road.







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