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COSMIC RHINO

UN report tries to promote insects as food

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Have eaten a few strange things (scorpion, grasshoppers and I think a moth) whilst visiting the street food sellers in Bangkok with no ill effects.

 

All good protein if you can find your way through the exoskeleton.

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I bought some insects from a street seller in Cambodia. Seemed nice enough but I was VERY drunk at the time so I would have found anything apart from a Pot Noodle tasty.

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Right... I'm off down to the local Woolworths to buy a bag of grasshoppers :)

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Have eaten a few strange things (scorpion, grasshoppers and I think a moth) whilst visiting the street food sellers in Bangkok with no ill effects.

 

All good protein if you can find your way through the exoskeleton.

I ate a moth in Bangkok too. Dropped into my beer and I didn't notice. Scorpions? I haven't seen them, but doesn't mean they're not on the menu. If it moves it's food for sure.

 

Here is an enthusiastic article to help you identify some of your delicacies.... http://importfood.com/thai_insects.html

 

Much better for you than crisps as long as you ignore the effects of DDT.... although I can't say I really like them that much - especially once they get cold and soggy

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A number of years ago I squashed a moth , there was a whole lot of fus in the news about them, and the comments were that the local first people eat them. it tasted of nothing.

 

Something else that many people would not been keen on is a whole lot of garlic, I once saw a recipie from the appropiately named Stinky Rose for mashed potatoes with 1 head of garlic per potatoe.

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Have eaten a few strange things (scorpion, grasshoppers and I think a moth) whilst visiting the street food sellers in Bangkok with no ill effects.

 

All good protein if you can find your way through the exoskeleton.

I ate a moth in Bangkok too. Dropped into my beer and I didn't notice. Scorpions? I haven't seen them, but doesn't mean they're not on the menu. If it moves it's food for sure.

 

Here is an enthusiastic article to help you identify some of your delicacies.... http://importfood.com/thai_insects.html

 

Much better for you than crisps as long as you ignore the effects of DDT.... although I can't say I really like them that much - especially once they get cold and soggy

 

It was a few years ago admittedly, so perhaps things have changed.

 

At least my moth was deep fried - not raw.

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this idea continues to be promoted

 

This is a serious take on it, I also find it amusing , a bit of a diversion amongst reports of wildlife poaching, mass social injustice etc

 

this case Columbia university press THE INSECT COOKBOOK

 

 

In The Insect Cookbook, two entomologists and a chef make the case for insects as a sustainable source of protein for humans and a necessary part of our future diet. They provide consumers and chefs with the essential facts about insects for culinary use, with recipes simple enough to make at home yet boasting the international flair of the world's most chic dishes.

The Insect Cookbook features delicious recipes and interviews with top chefs, insect farmers, political figures, and nutrition experts, including chef René Redzepi, whose establishment was elected three times as "best restaurant of the world"; Kofi Annan, former secretary-general of the United Nations; and Daniella Martin of Girl Meets Bug. The book contains all you need to know about cooking with insects, where to buy them, which ones are edible, and how to store and prepare them at home and in commercial spaces.
$27.95 $19.57
Use discount code INSVAN at check-out
£19.95 | Cloth | 216 pages | 126 color photograps

* Customers in the UK, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and South Africa should contact customer@wiley.com
FOLLOW COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS:
ic_fbk_22.png ic_twit_22.png

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