Game Warden

Show us your zebras...

95 posts in this topic

@@Panthera Pardus

 

Common Zebra population are found even further north than Northern Kenya, specifically in the Omo Valley and southern Rift Valley in Ethiopia. Perhaps the population in Nech Sar NP is the most northern in the continent.

 

Boma NP in what is now South Sudan hosted 20,000 zebras in the early 1980s. If this population would have not become locally extinct, it would likely be the northernmost one.

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Thanks @@Paolo.

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Thanks @@Paolo you beat me to it I was about to make the same point myself.

 

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Boehm's zebras (Equus quagga boehmi) in Nechsiar NP Ethiopia

I would think that these Nechisar zebras are the most northerly left in Africa but I guess their range in Ethiopia may have extended slightly further north in the past.

The race of zebras in South Sudan is Equus quagga borensis curiously these animals are generally maneless.

 

Very interesting to see your photos of the 'witgat zebras' in Mokala NP @@Panthera Pardus it looks like they're still a bit too stripey for typical quaggas but the brown colouration on their rumps is definitely promising, I think the birth of a zebra with a coat pattern typical of a quagga is probably not too far away.

 

Here's a link to the Quagga Project for more info

 

The Hartmann's mountain zebra does just extend south of Namibia into the Northern Cape and are found in three protected areas, though I imagine all of the animals in Augrabies, Richtersveld and Goegap have been reintroduced from Namibia. I would be interested to know if there really are any of these zebras left in Iona NP in Angola as I can't find any up to date info on the web, since Iona is part of a Transfrontier park with Skeleton Coast I hope perhaps it will be restocked with animals from Namibia before too long to either replace missing species or just to inject new blood. In the current climate I can't see desert elephants or rhinos returning to Iona anytime soon but Hartmann's mountain zebras and some other species could certainly be moved to the park.

 

For more info on the endangered Grevy's Zebra

 

Grevy's Zebra Trust

 

 

 

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Thanks @@inyathi for the additional information and photos.

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Masai Mara, Motorogi Conservancy, 2013

 

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Naboisho

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OOC:

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Mara North Conservancy

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Posted (edited)

The race of zebras in South Sudan is Equus quagga borensis curiously these animals are generally maneless.

 

 

Likewise the zebras in Kidepo. I think they are part of the same population.

 

It would be interesting whether the zebras in more southern parts of Karamoja (like Pian Upe) are the same or are linked to the northern Kenya population.

 

Interestingly, you find maneless zebras in northeast Kenya too, for instance in Ishaqbini Conservancy.

Edited by Paolo

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This is very interesting discussion and a chance for me to clear my own doubts for the last 1 year which after getting them cleared by one guide and then an argument with another, I had kind of shelved in my mind. So this is what I think I know.

 

The Equus Burchelli has been renamed Equus Quagga which is the same as Plains Zebra. Calling it Burchell's Zebra is a misnomer. Burchell's zebra ( Equus Quagga Burchelli) is a sub-species thought to be extinct after the last one died in 1918 in a german zoo, was later concluded to still occur in Kwazulu Natal and Etosha. It is so close to the Equus Quagga Antiquorum ( Damara Zebra) that they are infact the same and hence the earlier name of Equus Quagga Burchelli applies. So the Plain's Zebra is not really Burchell's Zebra. Burchell's is a sub-species of Plain's Zebra.

 

So while Equus Quagga ( Plains Zebra or Common Zebra) is found from as far north as south Ethiopia to southern Africa, the Equus Quagga Burchelli is found only in the belt Kwazulu-Natal , Etosha. The confusion in names comes from the fact that the Plains Zebra was earlier named Equus Burchelli and the Equus Quagga was, a long time ago, thought to be a different species. This has now been corrected for a lot of years now with DNA sampling having proved them to be more a color variant or sub-species of Plains Zebra and infact the following link says that the Plains Zebra in southern Africa show more similarily to Equus Quagga Quagga than to Plains Zebra in east Africa.

 

Equus Quagga Quagga is indeed thought to be extinct but this project in Mokala is very interesting ( thanks @@Panthera Pardus). I think this paragraph from the link below shows why there is still doubt if the Witgat Zebras could be Equus Quagga Quagga

 

 

 

RETURN OF THE QUAGGA
Bringing back an extinct ‘species’ seems like a near-impossible undertaking – quaggas, after all, were thought to have died out more than a century ago. But then the DNA analysis of museum specimens proved that the quagga exhibited minimal genetic variation from plains zebras and was no more than a colour variant or subspecies. Furthermore, plains zebras from South Africa were found to be more closely related to the quagga than to plains zebras from elsewhere in Africa. In fact, the species’ black-and-white pattern becomes less distinct and more ‘quagga-like’ in the southern reaches of its range. In the wake of these discoveries, the Quagga Project was initiated in 1987 with the long-term objective of trying to concentrate the diluted and dispersed quagga characteristics from plains zebras. Quaggas were distinguished by having black-and-white stripes mainly on their forequarters while their hindquarters were almost solid brown, so the project focused on selecting for breeding only zebras with reduced striping and darker background coloration. SANParks joined the initiative in June 2000, making Vaalbos – and later Mokala – a hub. Young zebras with heavy striping are removed before they reach sexual maturity to ensure that only those with the desired quagga-like traits are kept in the Mokala gene pool. Interestingly, although these animals exhibit reduced striping towards the hindquarters and on the legs, they have a distinctive pale – rather than brown – rump. This aberration has led to the Mokala plains zebra (left) being dubbed the ‘witgat zebra

 

 

 

http://www.stevecunliffe.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Africa-Geographic-Mokala.pdf

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It is very interesting @@Anita and thanks for your input. Even the scientists are in disagreement about some of the classifications.

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Zebras in the crater, April 2013. Nowhere have I found such relaxed zebras.

 

 

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Stallion in the Ngorongoro Crater

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Cape Mountain Zebra, Swartberg Wildlife Reserve, Western Cape

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2 zebra stallions going at in in Addo

 

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I know that there are some great zebra pics out there just waiting to be uploaded... how about some Grevy's for instance?

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These 2 were taken at Okaukuejo Waterhole, Etosha NP in August 2012

 

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Etosha NP, 2008

 

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Serengeti, 2008

 

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Lake Nakuru NP, 2005

 

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Cape Mountain Zebras on the Welgevonden Reserve in Western Cape

 

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Cape Mountain Zebra brosing amongst the fynbos.

Klein Karoo

 

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Cape Mountain Zebra

Swartberg Private Wildlife Reserve, Klein Karoo

 

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Taken at Vlei Pan, Madikwe, on our way out of the reserve. It was around midday and the waterhole was heaving. Just about every animal imaginable put in an appearance.

 

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Cape Mountain Zebra in the Klein Karoo, looking for fresh green shoots amongst the burnt stuff

 

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Nice pics, folks!

 

Zebras at sunrise near Nebrownii waterhole in Etosha, Namibia.

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Zebras at dawn in Mana Pools...how's that light?

On foot, of course!

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@@Morkel Erasmus - I only seem to be able to see the left hand side of your recent photos - nice though they are, maybe a problem with the uploading?? everyone elses' are ok :unsure:

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@@Tdgraves all displaying ok at the HQ...

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