Game Warden

Show us your nyala...

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Posted (edited)

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Male Nyala in Sabi Sands



Photographed on 2 October, 2015 at 6:38 pm in Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 200mm f/2.8L II telephoto lens.



ISO 800, 1/160 sec., f/2.8, 200mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



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~ The one mild wish carried with me to South Africa was granted during the second evening game drive when this male nyala was encountered alongside the track.



The intense saturation of its colors was visually appealing, as was its relatively calm disposition. I grinned while observing it, happy to finally see firsthand such a distinctive species.


Edited by Tom Kellie
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Beautiful animal and beautiful photo, Tom. Welcome back, hope you gad a splendid safari.

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All the above taken at uMkhuze Game Reserve, KZN South Africa from the kuMasinga hide.

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~ @@Game Warden

 

The male nyala on the left is prancing, isn't he?

His left rear hoof is up ever so delicately, as if he were practicing a ballet move.

The curvature of his tail, showing off the white underside, and the upward direction of his horns add to the artful nature of the pose.

It's one of the finest nyala images I've seen, due to your having snapped the shutter at exactly the right moment.

I'm interested that it was taken in a hide. To this day, I'm yet to visit any hide in Africa, having only done so in Asia.

Thank you very much for this prancing nyala.

Tom K.

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attachicon.gifNyala.JPG

Male Nyala in Sabi Sands

Photographed on 2 October, 2015 at 6:38 pm in Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 200mm f/2.8L II telephoto lens.

ISO 800, 1/160 sec., f/2.8, 200mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.

****************************************************************************************************

~ The one mild wish carried with me to South Africa was granted during the second evening game drive when this male nyala was encountered alongside the track.

The intense saturation of its colors was visually appealing, as was its relatively calm disposition. I grinned while observing it, happy to finally see firsthand such a distinctive species.

So glad you saw one!

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An interesting side note on nyala...

 

Males and females of large antelope species are referred to as bulls and cows; and males and females of smaller antelope species are referred to as rams and ewes: oryx bull, eland cow, springbok ram, impala ewe, etc.

 

Nyala serves as the dividing line. Interestingly, male nyalas are called bulls, but the female nyalas are called ewes, not cows. Perhaps this is because there is so much sexual dimorphism in the species (males, among other things, much bigger than females).

 

Follow-up question on nomenclature for you @@Safaridude concerning young antelope. Are the young of large antelope species called calves? And are the young of small antelope species called lambs? And which designation is given to Nyala young (and does it differ by sex like the adults)?

 

Thanks in advance.

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@@offshorebirder

 

As you suggest, I believe that "lamb" is the correct word to use concerning the young of small antelopes ("calf" for the young of large antelopes).

 

Now, with respect to the young of nyala... that is an interesting question! I am not sure there is a hard and fast rule that exists. "Lamb" feels more right to me. Don't ask me why!

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Sabie Sands, 2002

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~ @@Safaridude

 

In the trip report I'm presently uploading, there will be various photographs of both nyala and bushbuck which I frequently observed in Sabi Sands, South Africa.

Both were new species to me, aside from a single transitory encounter with a bushbuck in Nairobi National Park.

The males – rams? – of both species had raised raised hair going across their spine to their tails.

My resources here are limited, thus it's unclear to me whether or not the term of choice for that feature is a ‘mane’ or a ‘crest’, something else, or it doesn't matter.

I grew up thinking of horse manes on their necks but not along their spines.

Crests have become associated in my mind with plumage crowns on birds.

Yet translating resources here, it seems that this feature of male nyala and bushbuck may be an extended mane.

Is that reasonable, or have I overlooked something out of ignorance and low experience?

I ask here in the nyala forum, hoping that any answer might be available to others similarly uncertain of the nomenclature.

Thank you for considering my question.

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie

 

On the "ram" issue...

 

An interesting side note on nyala...

 

Males and females of large antelope species are referred to as bulls and cows; and males and females of smaller antelope species are referred to as rams and ewes: oryx bull, eland cow, springbok ram, impala ewe, etc.

 

Nyala serves as the dividing line. Interestingly, male nyalas are called bulls, but the female nyalas are called ewes, not cows. Perhaps this is because there is so much sexual dimorphism in the species (males, among other things, much bigger than females).

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Londolozi, Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger,SA. July 2015

 

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~ @@Kitsafari

 

I like your Londolozi nyala!

Such beautiful animals!

Thank you for posting these when your about to depart for India.

Tom K.

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I will try for an update here about this very beautiful antelope

 

All photos below taken in South Africa, Mkuze game reserve

Male...

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...Female...

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...and cub :wub:

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That head shot in post 39 is gorgeous @@Soukous

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That head shot in post 39 is gorgeous @@Soukous

 

~ @@Soukous

 

Please add my hearty agreement with @@wilddog's comment above.

Tom K.

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Sprouting Horns, Nonetheless Shy

Photographed on 2 October, 2015 at 5:25 pm in Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 200mm f/2.8L II telephoto lens.

ISO 125, 1/400 sec., f/2.8, 200mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.

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~ When this nyala walked past, his sprouting horns were apparent. Young, without other striking adult male characteristics, he was reticent, prudently remaining behind vegetation.

As nyala were an unfamiliar species to me, I'd never previously observed a juvenile male. How long would it be before the grey pelage and dramatic horns transformed him into a formidable male?

 

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@@Tom Kellie, I am by no means an expert, but would suspect that this little guy is about a year old. I also believe that in another 2 years he will have attained reasonably dark colouration, but he will continue growing darker and his horns should continue growing longer for his whole life.

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@@Tom Kellie, I am by no means an expert, but would suspect that this little guy is about a year old. I also believe that in another 2 years he will have attained reasonably dark colouration, but he will continue growing darker and his horns should continue growing longer for his whole life.

 

~ @@Peter Connan

 

Thanks to your kind response, now I know.

I appreciate that!

He seemed a bit awkward, less sure-footed than the females around him.

It takes time and practice to grow into manhood, including for nyala.

Tom K.

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Male Nyala Hidden Behind A Bush



Photographed at 8:54 am on 26 January, 2016 at Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 500, 1/1600 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


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The nyala sightings at Leopard Hills are regular, but often moderately distant, especially males. This particular male was standing behind the thick foliage of a bush beside the track.


Although there was no clear shot, it was possible to focus on his eye at f/2.8, which brought out his beauty, despite the obscuring vegetation. His large, soulful eyes appealed to me.

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Shadow Walker



Photographed on 4 October, 2015 at 5:36 pm in Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 200mm f/2.8L II telephoto lens.



ISO 125, 1/400 sec., f/2.8, 200mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



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~ A female and male nyala quietly walked out of a forest while we were watching hornbills. They came along, one-by-one, seemingly oblivious to our presence, passing very near.



The distinctive nyala markings were bold...yet not. They brought to mind certain brush strokes on canvas when Henri Matisse was depicting textile patterns in partial shade.


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@@Tom Kellie You have a way with words and photos. :)

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~ @@Game Warden

 

Muito obrigado.

Estou muito emocionado com o que você escreveu.

Tom K.

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Male Nyala with Flies



Photographed on 5 October, 2015 at 7:27 am in Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/5.6L super-telephoto lens.



ISO 800, 1/2500 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



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~ Pity this poor ole feller, flies clustered by his eyes, no ready appendage to shoo them away. Perhaps business as usual in the daily routine of a Sabi Sands male nyala, yet nonetheless annoying.



He was a member of a bachelor herd in shadow beside the track. We were heading out to a possible resting leopard sighting, but paused to admire the striking form of the nyala, a Sabi Sands favorite.


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@@Tom Kellie,really like#45, Nyala portrait, such pretty creatures. I also appreciate you going to the effort to show you camera settings, really useful for those of us that are on the "starting blocks" with photography.

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