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Found 1 result

  1. Using a combination of satellite and ground data, a research team can map multiple indicators of monkey distribution, including human activity zones as inferred from roads and settlements, direct detections from mosquito-derived iDNA, animal sound recordings, plus detections of other species that are usually found when monkeys are present, such as other large vertebrates. ARTICLE CONTINUES Alex Bush, Rahel Sollmann, Andreas Wilting, Kristine Bohmann, Beth Cole, Heiko Balzter, Christopher Martius, András Zlinszky, Sébastien Calvignac-Spencer, Christina A. Cobbold, Terence P. Dawson, Brent C. Emerson, Simon Ferrier, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Martin Herold, Laurence Jones, Fabian H. Leendertz, Louise Matthews, James D. A. Millington, John R. Olson, Otso Ovaskainen, Dave Raffaelli, Richard Reeve, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Torrey W. Rodgers, Stewart Snape, Ingrid Visseren-Hamakers, Alfried P. Vogler, Piran C. L. White, Martin J. Wooster, Douglas W. Yu. Connecting Earth observation to high-throughput biodiversity data. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2017; 1 (7): 0176 DOI: 10.1038/s41559-017-0176 Cite This Page: MLA APA Chicago University of Leicester. "Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 June 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170622121932.htm>. University of Leicester. (2017, June 22). Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 28, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170622121932.htm University of Leicester. "Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170622121932.htm (accessed June 28, 2017). Article in PDF http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0176.pdf it is technical and beyond understanding by someone who is not trained as a scientist

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