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Found 5 results

  1. I have been reading several tour itineraries and I have realized many says that of late things have changed in lake Nakuru National park and that at times there are not as many flamingos. They go ahead to say that they are on high population when the lake is shallow alkaline and warm. Its basically the time algae grows and flamingos flock the lake to feed on it. My question now comes in. When is the right time to have these conditions? I will appreciate your help fellow travelers.
  2. Started off to Bhigwan, situated on the border of Pune Solapur Highway, early morning with bunch of Architects, some professionals & some students, who were completely unaware about the birding and tge magical feeling it gives. As soon as our boats started moving, their unawareness turned into excitement and further turned into hunger to know more and more. We saw many many birds just like any Bhigwan Visitor would, like Herons, Egrets, Ibises, Storks, Godwits, Lesser Cormorants, Purple Moorhen, lots of Shovelers, Coots, Gulls and Terns & the highlight of the visit were many many Flamingos. But the exceptional sighting this time was the *Bar-headed Geese*...the highest flying migratory bird..! Something we badly search for, everytime we visit Bhigwan. After this exciting boating of Bhigwan, accompanied by lots of Migratory & Resident birds, we headed to Bhuleshwar. Our friend & an archeology student & a soon to be an expert in historical monuments, Digvijay escorted us all to each and every details of the temple of Bhigwan. One of the oldest monuments we have so close to Pune. The information he shared kept everyone mesmerised and completely changed the angle of looking at the temples. A great contribution it was for our group. In all, the day was full of Nature & History which made those Monument lovers the Nature lovers, and nature lovers the Monument lovers. Each and everyone bagged something new from this one day tour. Thanks to all the participants who were constantly excited and were ready to accept and absorb whatever they were offered. One of the best one day outing it was...!!!
  3. Started off to Bhigwan, situated on the border of Pune Solapur Highway, early morning with bunch of Architects, some professionals & some students, who were completely unaware about the birding and tge magical feeling it gives. As soon as our boats started moving, their unawareness turned into excitement and further turned into hunger to know more and more. We saw many many birds just like any Bhigwan Visitor would, like Herons, Egrets, Ibises, Storks, Godwits, Lesser Cormorants, Purple Moorhen, lots of Shovelers, Coots, Gulls and Terns & the highlight of the visit were many many Flamingos. But the exceptional sighting this time was the *Bar-headed Geese*...the highest flying migratory bird..! Something we badly search for, everytime we visit Bhigwan. After this exciting boating of Bhigwan, accompanied by lots of Migratory & Resident birds, we headed to Bhuleshwar. Our friend & an archeology student & a soon to be an expert in historical monuments, Digvijay escorted us all to each and every details of the temple of Bhigwan. One of the oldest monuments we have so close to Pune. The information he shared kept everyone mesmerised and completely changed the angle of looking at the temples. A great contribution it was for our group. In all, the day was full of Nature & History which made those Monument lovers the Nature lovers, and nature lovers the Monument lovers. Each and everyone bagged something new from this one day tour. Thanks to all the participants who were constantly excited and were ready to accept and absorb whatever they were offered. One of the best one day outing it was...!!!
  4. @@Game Warden - I was not sure if you meant we should copy and paste the previous posts (from two topics) into this new debate topic, or whether you would be moving/copying the full posts. If the latter, feel free to edit this and insert the original posts in their proper timeline into this topic. This debate concerns the question of whether low altitude flamingo-viewing flights by noisy aircraft, in particular helicopters, is detrimental to flamingos and harms efforts to conserve them. It seems there are Safaritalk members who do not think this is so. In a recent topic - @@Safaridude posted images he took from a helicopter of Flamingos fleeing in a seeming panic: http://eaip.austroco...-1.1-en-GB.html "The attention of all persons in command of an aircraft is drawn to the necessity to refrain from low flying over National parks, National Reserves and Game Reserves and to the fact that under existing legislation, provisions have been made for prosecution in cases of intentional low flying. 1.2.2 To protect Game in areas detailed in 1.2.4 below, persons in command should not fly below 1500 feet above ground level except in an emergency or when in the process of landing and taking off from a licensed aerodrome." Section 1.2.4 goes on to list Kenyan National Parks, Reserves and Game Reserves. Lake Bogoria is listed. This prohibition is for good reason and I contend the 1,500 foot minimum height should be increased over Flamingo-hosting lakes. Like shorebirds, Flamingos live on a knife-edge energy budget and even a little regular disturbance can create conditioning problems for the birds (particularly soon before breeding season). Disturbance can also cause abandonment of feeding and nesting grounds. Another point: When comparing Flamingo disturbance to Safarigoers' disturbance of Buffalo for example - the question arises: do the helicopter flights contribute a portion of their fee to Lake Bogoria National Reserve or to Flamingo conservation? More to come soon in a thread on the Wildlife Conservation forum. " Subsequently, @@Safaridude, @@Sangeeta, @Paolo - to name a few - essentially said they did not think it was a problem in terms of disturbing the flamingos. Multiple members also made statements to the effect that @@Safaridude and company were at a considerable distance from the birds, and that it was inappropriate to judge distance just from a few photos. I replied that: " Respondents thus far seem unwilling to admit the strong possibility that the helicopter flight in question was in violation of the law and therefore of ethical wildlife viewing." I followed by saying I did not make an assessment from photos alone, that I used @@Safaridude's OWN WORDS ("There were many instances when the chopper got pretty close to a flock"), combined with his saying that the photos show this, combined with photo detail in a couple of cases that seems hard to achieve from greater than half a kilometer away in a vibrating helicopter. Thus it was perfectly reasonable to suspect (or even conclude) they were less than half a kilometer from the birds. Subsequently I stated that my feedback from multiple Kenyan experts all condemned the flight in particular and helicopters near flamingos in general. Then another statement from @@Sangeeta indicated she still did not seem to think it was a problem for flamingos. I will follow this post (perhaps tomorrow at this point) with citations and excerpts from peer-reviewed ecology + conservation + ornithology journals to support my contention that relatively low altitude flamingo-viewing flights of noisy aircraft (in particular helicopters) are detrimental to flamingos and should not be pursued. I think it has been abundantly demonstrated that getting closer than 500 meters to flamingos in an aircraft in Kenya is both illegal and unethical...
  5. Just back from 3 weeks in Namibia. This was my fourth visit to this country that is blessed with jaw-dropping scenery, desert, plains and wetland wildlife and friendly people. I re-visited some favourite locations such as Swakopmund and Etosha as well as making a first trip to the Caprivi, a land of rivers and floodplains in the northeast of the country. Special sightings included Carmine Bee-eaters, sable and roan, wildlife action at Etosha's waterholes and flamingos at Walvis Bay. The full length Namibia trip report begins at post #38 in this trip report in the Botswana forum.

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