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Found 89 results

  1. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/24/siberia-tigers-conservation-poachers-extinction ~ From the U.K. Guardian: “Anti-Poaching Drive Brings Siberia's Tigers Back from Brink”
  2. I’ve just been reading this interesting paper on black rhino genetics a subject that was evidently poorly understood, piecing together the genetic history of these animals has been made very difficult due to the rapid and catastrophic decline in their population. Extinctions, genetic erosion and conservation options for the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) It is interesting to see the distribution that they have gone with; I believe there is s till a question mark over the distribution of black rhinos in West Africa, my understanding is that there is really still no definitive proof for the presence of black rhinos further west than North Eastern Nigeria and the far west of Niger basically the region around Lake Chad. Whereas their map shows rhinos as far west as Benin and Burkina Faso, some other maps online show rhinos as far west as Senegal. The only actual evidence of black rhinos much further west than Lake Chad is some rhino spoor that the 19th century German explorer Heinrich Barth allegedly found on the east bank of the Niger River in 1853, I would guess somewhere between Niamey and ‘W’ National Park. Barth was familiar with rhinos having encountered them near Lake Chad but did not believe they occurred so far west he never saw the actual animal only its spoor. This is of course all sadly somewhat academic now as black rhinos are entirely extinct in Western and Central Africa now, the rhinos due to be reintroduced into Zakouma NP in Chad next year will be coming from South Africa I’m not sure if I’ve posted this before but here’s a paper on the distribution of the black rhino in West Africa. Historical distribution of the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in West Africa
  3. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2351989416300804 http://www.discoverwildlife.com/news/africa-tops-megafauna-protection ~ This April, 2017 research article published in Global Ecology and Conservation presents the findings of a comparison study of nations with regard to conservation of megafauna. The primary evaluative criteria were: ecology, extent of protected areas, and percentage of GDP allocated to conservation. African nations were notably strong in protecting both carnivores and herbivores.
  4. In just two weeks time East African black rhinos will return to Rwanda. Back in 1961 and 62 a number of East African black rhinos Diceros bicornis michaeli were captured in the Tsavo region of Kenya and taken to Addo Elephant NP in the Eastern Cape. Rhinos at this time were entirely extinct in the Cape, having ideal habitat it was hoped that Addo would provide a secure home for the rhinos, and that they would form an insurance population given the increasing level of poaching in East Africa. In 1977 three bulls of the south central subspecies D. b. minor were unfortunately moved to the park from Zululand, In 1980 the IUCN/SSC African Rhino Specialist Group sent a request that these bulls and any hybrid calves they might have produced be removed to preserve the genetic integrity of the michaeli rhinos. The rhinos thrived in Addo until SANParks decided they wanted to replace these rhinos with so called Cape black rhinos D. b. bicornis it had been thought that this subspecies was extinct, but it was recently determined that black rhinos in Namibia in fact belong to this subspecies. The East African blacks were removed from Addo, while some were sent up to Tanzania to the Ngorongoro Crater to inject some new blood into the existing population and some to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary, the rest went to a ranch called Thaba Tholo in Limpopo Province; from there some have since been sent to the Serengeti. 20 of these East African black rhinos at Thaba Tholo have now been captured and will soon begin the long journey from South Africa up to Rwanda to found a new population in Akagera National Park. The original black rhinos found in Rwanda were presumably hunted to extinction in colonial times, but remarkably in 1958 the first ever rhino translocation in Africa was carried out, re-establishing black rhinos in Akagera NP, the rhinos thrived in their new home. Even more remarkable than the fact that rhinos were reintroduced in 1958, is the fact that the very last of their descendants survived until 2007, somehow despite Rwanda’s civil war and the loss of half of the park, a few rhinos managed to survive. Unfortunately not quite long enough and the last of the rhinos died just three years before African Parks officially came in in 2010 to manage Akagera. African Parks, The Akagera Management Company and the Rwanda Development Board are now returning these animals to the park once more, the rhinos are due to arrive in Akagera on the 16th of May. These animals should thrive just as their predecessors did and form a new and important population of D. b. michaeli rhinos back in East Africa, and I hope in the future provide a source of rhinos for further reintroductions elsewhere, perhaps someday into Uganda where black rhinos are extinct. Following the successful reintroduction of lions in 2015 Akagera will soon be a 'big five' park once more which should be very good news for tourism to the park. " I was extremely pleased when I first heard that African Parks would be taking on Akagera NP having been privileged to visit in 86 and I have been waiting some years to hear this news, it's fantastic to know that it is finally happening. You can follow the story at Rhinos Return to Rwanda
  5. The Chinko project in Central African Republic is locking to be a real success story! In one of Africa’s most conflict torn countries this project that started as a hunting concession but evolved to a hunting concession in the core area and a protected area around it with community work and conservation hand in hand. A lot of research and anitpoaching is under way and the wildlife seems to be on the rise. This is wonderful new because the central African wildlife and the unique nature has been under enormous threat and in risk of total or almost total extinction. This project seem to be a good example of conservation and what I think the only way we are going to save big parts of the African wildlife and nature. Without giving wildlife areas and wildlife a value for the local people and for the government this last wild areas will succumb to farms of different kinds poaching or other ways of making money and food. And no wonder, food is a necessity and if an area is not economical viable then no one is going to protect it. Soon serious photgraphers and tourists can come here and experience a African wildlife that is unique Here are some links to both the hunting company that initiated the hole process and to the Chinko project http://www.chinkoproject.com/ http://www.cawasafari.com/?p=home
  6. https://www.panthera.org/blog/2017/06/15/what-happened-angolas-1000-lions After 3 years of civil war Panthera's test zones revealed shocking statistics about the lions of Angola. The story is on Panthera's own blog.
  7. "The world depends on individuals like Ms. Paundi to protect increasingly imperiled wildlife. But many rangers do not receive the support they need. A recent World Wildlife Fund study ( http://www.worldwildlife.org/publications/ranger-perceptions-africa/ ) of 570 rangers in 12 African countries found that 59 percent did not have basic supplies like boots, tents and GPS devices, and that 42 percent had not received adequate training. Despite the critical role rangers play in the poaching crisis, conservation organizations tend to overlook the need for everyday resources, said Peter Newland, the director of training at 51 Degrees, a private security company in Kenya. “Donors outside of Africa want to see sexy, high-tech solutions like drones and ground sensors, not to hear about the need for warm clothing, boots and better food for rangers,” he said. “Large nongovernmental groups spend huge amounts, yet there are rangers calling me for socks.” http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/28/science/a-forgotten-step-in-saving-african-wildlife-protecting-the-rangers.html
  8. This article in Ensia magazine (an environmental/conservation publication) concerns the environmental impact of commercial game farming in South Africa--something I never really knew existed at this level. Full disclosure, this was written by a friend of mine--a South African who used to live here in NYC and who I birded with on occasion, who has since moved back to South Africa. http://edge.ensia.com/fenced-in/ I am just posting as I think this may be of interest to some--I am not drawing any conclusions.
  9. If you wonder why I'm always harping on about payment for ecosystem services, I recommend you read this article (right to the bottom - don't stop halfway). It provides helpful explanations of what nature and healthy ecosystems do for humans, and how we can put economic values on them - meaning a loss of a healthy ecosystem is an economic and humanitarian loss as well. Good explanations on why conserving ecosystems, rather than single species, is important (in other words, don't be turned off by the title) http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150715-why-save-an-endangered-species
  10. http://articles.latimes.com/2013/apr/25/opinion/la-oe-packer-how-to-save-lions-20130425 love the ending: "we need a latter-day Marshall Plan that integrates the true costs of park management into the economic priorities of international development agencies. Lions are too valuable to take for granted."
  11. Hi, all! Somehow, it's been 2 years since I last posted to/visited SafariTalk! In that time, I've almost finished my dissertation (the big paper on lions is in review and due out before year's end), have spent a year in London, got engaged to a lovely Englishman, founded a community development startup in SSA, and begun the post-PhD job search in East & Southern Africa. As I trend toward the end of my PhD, I'm also working on a new project with a collaborator at the Cambridge Conservation Initiative. We're trying to collect informations about pangolins, those darling little walking avocados that suffer so badly at the hands (and feet) of poachers/safari guides everywhere. During my time in the Mara, I gathered a few 2nd hand reports about pangolin sightings, plus a lot of Maasai mythology related to the pangolin (endtaboi in the local Maa) and its importance to local culture/ecology. But a few isn't enough -- so I need your help. If anyone has stories/sightings, and ESPECIALLY gps-location-linked pictures of pangolins anywhere in East Africa, please please please let me know. I'm more than happy to make you a co-author on our paper if you're keen, and happier still just to learn what your pangolin encounters have been like. Anyway -- hello, again, SafariTalk! May your grasses be lush, your cattle be fat, and your wildlife sightings be plentiful and photogenic.
  12. Hi everyone, Something a little special came to our team at Captured In Africa recently, namely a gentleman by the name of Herbert Brauer. Of course many of you will have heard of Herbert, having filmed Lady Liuwa for the acclaimed documentary The Last Lioness in Liuwa Plain. Herbert is running his own private safari tour to Liuwa, not only to spend time with Lady Liuwa (who is getting on in age now) and her new resident pride, but to spend time with ourselves, to spend time with nature and in appreciation of what special lands we are fortunately enough to travel and what precious wildlife we are privileged to see. My colleague Drew Abrahamson and I feel privileged and honoured to work with Herbert on this tour. Equally so, a pleasure to listen to his words of wisdom from his experience in filming, but also his philosophy on our self, nature and wildlife. The safari to Liuwa plans to be truly special.... personally, I'd love to join this one The below was a quick Q&A I did with Herbert recently, so I hope you enjoy reading Herbert; Lady Liuwa Filmmaker Herbert Brauer Takes You on Safari Every so often, a film comes along which we connect with. A documentary which uncovers and explores not just a story, but a moment in time that is so emotionally driven, that we cannot help but fall in love with nature & wildlife - The Last Lioness, the story of a single lone lioness in Zambia’s Liuwa Plain - is one of those defining moments in wildlife film. Herbert Brauer filmed the Last Lioness on Liuwa Plain when Lady Liuwa was the sole remnant of lions in this area. Wildlife cameraman Herbert Brauer, who filmed THE LAST LIONESS in Liuwa National Park, now offers a unique, fully serviced 7 night safari program in Liuwa National Park in November 2016. He guides participants to authentically expand their awareness, and consciously connect deeply with Nature. This remote wilderness area in western Zambia truly captures one's heart and supports personal growth to those who seek it. Captured In Africa spoke with Herbert in the build up to announcing this one-off itinerary; Q: How did you first become aware of Lady Liuwa and what made you want to film her and the situation in Liuwa? “We were told by the parks manager at the time, Tom Turner, that there was one single lioness in Liuwa National Park who had survived the poaching massacre and that IF we'd see her, could try our luck filming her. The manager preceding Tom has only seen her the first time two days before his two year contract ended.... So it was unexpected that we not only found her on my first day of my very first assignment as professional cameraman, but also filmed her for an extended period which forms part of an important sequence in ‘THE LAST LIONESS’.” Q: Were you ever in serious doubt of Lady Liuwa's (and future lion inhabitants) survival in Liuwa Plain? “African Park Networks' approach, commitment and tenacity has ensured that I never doubted Lady Liuwa's survival on the plains. They are supported by much forward thinking donors and local people who recognise their work. I was and am concerned about lion's future survival, especially in large unfenced wilderness areas. It is in these areas where lions should be able to manifest everything that makes them a truly wild species on every level. This counts for all species that we do not consciously habituate. We as humans became the single largest force on our planet. Most of us don't know that. I guess it's difficult to quantify but it can certainly be experienced consciously. That doesn't mean we have developed into a species that can function disconnected from the natural flow of the forces on our planet, and of the universe. We are in a situation where a critical mass of twenty first century humans needs to consciously recognise that the fundamental building blocks and elements of Nature outside of us are also inside of us, and what we do to Nature we do physically and energetically to ourselves. The stress we put on our environment is the stress we feel inside ourselves. So my view is that as humans we collectively need to once again recognise that BECAUSE we are human, we have a relationship with Nature. We absolutely have to take individual responsibility for that if we don't want to learn lessons much harder than our imaginations can create!!! We cannot leave the wellbeing and conservation of everything we call "wild nature" in the hands of a few concerned citizens acting as conservationists, filmmakers, educators etc. We cannot dump our responsibilities with regards to our environment in the hands of our minister of environmental affairs as little as we'd relinquish our relationships with family and friends in the hands of the minister of social affairs.” The new generation of lions in Liuwa Plain © Will Burrard-Lucas Q: Captured In Africa are deeply involved in conservation efforts and responsible tourism, so respecting boundaries between man and wildlife is important to us when on safari. You yourself showed this in the film when Lady Liuwa seemed to court your attention, yet you kept a respectful distance and didn't cross that boundary - how important is this for you and for responsible safaris/travel in general? “Often our love for nature can overwhelm us. We are feeling the freedom and good energy in the wild to the point that we need to make sure we still recognise and respect everything, including wild nature and her species for WHO THEY REALLY are. I never came across any other lion to whom I felt intuitively connected as deeply as Lady Liuwa. My interaction with her was unique and yet I had to make sure I respect her wild instincts. After all, that's what we wanted for her: To live life as a completely wild predator in Africa. It is really important to allow wild animals their space. How much that distance is, is is a matter of being educated and trained, and one's intuition if well developed.” Q: What has been the highlight for you, following your years in Liuwa and what is your hope for Lions in the wild? “My understanding of what has happened in Liuwa keeps deepening. Right now I must admit that one of my highlights happened when I was interviewed for THE LAST LIONESS. I became emotionally overwhelmed and recognised in that moment how Lady Liuwa is not merely the amazing individual she is. She humbly, strongly and convincingly reveals the essence of our Mother Earth's intelligence. Although much harm was done to her when her pride was killed barbarically by our human species who regard ourselves as the apex of intelligence on this planet, she never retaliated. We witnessed her lying in high grass, never attacking the local children walking past her a few metres away. Instead she followed me around camp at night, like our Mother Earth does each and every moment: forgiving, wanting to reconnect with a human, and to be respected for who she really is if I wanted to fully embrace, if not merely survive our special, profound relationship. That changed my understanding of what we call "Life" or "Nature" and my Vision forever.” Herbert filming Lady Liuwa, careful to not cross that invisible ethical boundary of becoming too close to wild animals Herbert, in partnership with Captured In Africa and Norman Carr Safaris, are offering an amazing opportunity to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime safari and journey of self-discovery to Liuwa Plain. In Herbert's own words: "My fundamental intention for this safari is that we expand our awareness to develop a deeper connection to our natural environment and at the same time, with our true selves. We create a better understanding of who we essentially are. The process is never ending. What is important for me is that our experiences and growth are authentic. We'll search for Lady and her new pride and spend quality time with them. We won't recreate the physical companionship I've had with Lady as documented in THE LAST LIONESS, but connect with her and different kinds of life forms and manifestations in Nature.” View this limited safari and enquire, by clicking below; THE LAST LIONESS SAFARI WITH CAPTURED IN AFRICA Captured In Africa give thanks to Herbert Brauer, Norman Carr Safaris and Will Burrard-Lucas. Any questions, you can drop me an email: paul@capturedinafrica.co.za
  13. I've just finished reading an article about worldwide conservation. it's a very long piece, but I persevered and ploughing through helped me link all the otherwise befuddling arguments provided about conservation. It is an objective look at how two approaches to conservation have helped, or not helped, wildlife and nature conservation. here's the link: https://news.mongabay.com/2016/04/big-conservation-gone-astray/?n3wsletter extracting a quote from the article: By Mongabay reporter Jeremy Hance "Borneo, one of the most biodiverse landscapes on the planet, is in ecological crisis. The Bornean rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni) — a subspecies of the Sumatran — is on the knife’s edge of extinction; less than 2,000 Bornean pygmy elephants (Elephas maximus borneensis) survive; and the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), distinct from the great ape in Sumatra, is being killed by people at a rate as high 4,000 a year. For the possibly hundreds of thousands of other species living on the island much less is known, but their homes — their forests — are falling at one of the highest rates in the world."
  14. In my quest to see the world's exotic cats my next choice was the largest feline found in the America's, the Jaguar. After doing some research it seemed the easiest location to spot them was the Pantanal in Brazil since during the hot season they come by the rivers. After looking into various companies (Brazil trips are not cheap even though our US dollar is about 4 times more than the Brazilian Real) and for the best viewing chance and something with in my budget, I learned staying on the houseboats and being on the river makes it all easier. There were several companies, but after contacting some it seemed Pantanal Nature Wildlife Tours 6 day, 5 nights trip would be my best option as I only had about 9 days off of work. All the companies seem to hang out in the same areas on the rivers as well as just like Africa, they radio each other to let each little boat know what is out there. So I left Chicago in early October and arrived in Cuiaba, Brazil day later. The video will take you through this experience. What I did not mention in the video was that the tour group consisted of myself, Eddie the guide and 2 nice people from Australia and a friendly teacher from New Zealand. Both parties had way more vacation/holiday time to spend traveling than me and I was jealous. The U.S. lacks in the vacation category for sure. Well, I hope you like the video and if anyone has any questions, please ask. https://youtu.be/a5jm7X-jRAs
  15. Great Plains Conservation launches the new Selinda Adventure Trail with 'heli-walking' and/or 'heli-canoeing'. Adventure is defined by a certain amount of unpredictability and unknown. It should also enhance senses and stimulate adrenaline. The new 5 days/4 nights Selinda Adventure Trail embodies this definition entirely: The itinerary primarily dictated by water levels in the Selinda Spillway, a seasonally flooded channel that connects the Okavango River to the west and the Linyanti Swamps to the east. When the Spillway has low water, or dry, we will operate a professionally guided walking safari; and when there is enough water we will offer a combination walking and canoeing expedition (formerly the Selinda Canoe Trail). Secondary effects to the itinerary route often depends on wildlife movements. The adventure for both experiences start with a thrilling 20 minute helicopter journey to the remote starting points in the vast 320,000 acre Selinda Reserve, giving an aerial perspective of the Selinda Spillway and the myriad of channels and lagoons that branch off it creating clearings in the pristine woodland. Call it ‘heli-walking’, ‘heli-stalking’ or ‘heli-canoeing’ if you like. The unpredictable nature of the floods means that your guests won’t know before they board the helicopter from the Selinda Reserve airstrip whether they will be doing the pure-walking safari or the combination walking and canoeing expedition. Be prepared to walk, regardless of whether the Spillway is dry or in flood. The 2016 season will operate 20 May to 11 October and in 2017 season from 02 April to 23 September. Download 2016 rates and departure dates here. 2017 rates, with Selinda Adventure Trail dates, will be sent shortly. Download full itineraries and factsheet here.
  16. Good morning! Feeling those Tuesday blues #BackToWork? Have no fear! Travel with us in and feel good; 10% sales goes straight to Tusk Trust to help preserve the wildlife and landscape for your family to see for generations to come. ORYX offer first class birding & wildlife holidays to East and Southern Africa. Run by former producer of Sir David Attenborough’s BBC series, we have great conservation partnerships and offer the most immersive wildlife experience possible. Travel to the stunning destinations the BBC The Hunt crew film their epic wildlife documentaries- Kruger is one of the largest national parks in Africa and probably the most famous. Making up the South African portion of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, that spans South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique, it is a vitally important conservation area for the whole of southern Africa. Also visit the southernmost point of South Africa- Cape Town and go in search of the great animals of the ocean- cage dive with great Whites and spot humback whales breaching. Tours up now (limited spaces): Leave a legacy when you travel with us. http://www.oryxwildlifesafaris.com/ Images ©Tania Rose Esteban.
  17. Have you thought about joining an exciting Rhinos Without Borders rhino release? It is a wild and exciting experience but a little difficult to attend. Now is your chance to join in on this amazing experience. In association with GoPro and the Great Plains Foundation, there is an opportunity that allows you to be in the midst of a rhino relocation from your sitting room. Rhinos Without Borders is a project moving 100 rhino from areas of high poaching and now drought conditions to the safety of remote regions deep within Botswana’s wilderness. With a poaching rate of one rhino every 7 hours these moves are critical to the survival of the species and using the latest GoPro technology they have produced a Virtual Reality experience that enables you to join in as if you were with us, standing alongside our experts and being talked through the process by Dereck Joubert, who is the CEO of Great Plains Conservation. We hope that you enjoy it. https://www.facebook.com/gopro/videos/10153659915031919/ This is a joint initiative between Great Plains Conservation and andBeyond. If you would like to support the Rhinos Without Borders initiative please go to www.greatplainsfoundation.com / www.rhinoswithoutborders.com
  18. a short trailer on the world's rarest bear in Gobi desert. a simple video frrom NatGeo but makes me want to watch more of it. Hope the link works. http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/news/gobi-bears-vin and an article to go with it: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/special-features/2014/04/140417-rarest-bears-world-mongolia-gobi/
  19. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12577/full ~ This Conservation Biology review of three books concerning Madagascar's past and present flora and fauna discusses the challenges to maintaining the island's biodiversity. The reviewer offers detailed comments on each book, concluding with the observation that more interdisciplinary research and negotiation is needed to mitigate Madagascar's ongoing conflicts.
  20. Craig Packer presented "Lions in the Balance: Man-Eaters, Manes, and Men with Guns" September 30, 2015 at the Friends of the University of Minnesota Libraries event at Coffman Memorial Union.
  21. Here is a fun citizen science project to do when you can't be on safari. My colleague Lisa Feldkamp has the details on Wildebeest Watch, an effort to document camera trap images of wildebeests. You go through the images and document behaviors. Read the full details here.
  22. Hello folks, I have been instructed to share with you some updates from here in Iringa and Ruaha national park. We have just hooked up with Pack For A Purpose so that you can now find a list of things to bring with you on safari that will make a big difference to people who will really appreciate it. Paul Tickner Safaris supports the Mkuyu Guide School which provides training and opportunities for local young people in the safari industry. You can find out more about that here paultickner.com/mkuyu-guide-school and find the packing list here www.packforapurpose.org/destinations/africa/tanzania/paul-tickner-safaris/ Follow us on social media for regular updates from the school. Safari wise we have had some wonderful times in Ruaha with some great people recently. Here is a sequence from one particularly incredible sighting we had when 5 lions pulled down a young elephant right in front of us. Read the comments section for added enjoyment www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3259373/Heart-breaking-scenes-herd-elephants-try-fail-protect-calf-hungry-pride-lions.html We are just announcing a group safari in partnership with Reis Voyage for 2016. The safari will take in the Ngorogoro Crater, the Serengeti, Ruaha national park and Mafia Island and promises to be a very special safari indeed, guided all the way by myself. You can find out more with this PDF www.paultickner.com/-/galleries/2016-north-south-tanzania-group-safari/-/medias/cee07823-df3c-4250-9ddf-ddb0af49c09a-timeless-tanzania-july-2016-v4 Thanks everybody and I hope to see some of you in Ruaha, Mafia Island and southern Tanzania very soon!
  23. Win an incredible £8,000 five night safari for two to Botswana. All money raised will support rhinos, for Save the Rhino & Wilderness Wildlife Trust.Rhinos could face extinction within 10 years. A £20 raffle ticket will help raise money to relocate rhinos to safety as part of the cross border rhino translocation project. Enter charity safari raffle Donated by Aardvark Safaris and its partners in Botswana, all proceeds go directly to two charities. All money raised will support rhino conservation, being split between the Wilderness Wildlife Trust for the largest ever cross border translocation of critically endangered rhino from areas with a high risk of poaching to the safe haven of Botswana and Save the Rhino International to help their work. The winner will enjoy a 5-day luxury safari for two that explores game-packed destinations in Botswana helping to protect endangered species, including elephant, rhino and big cats. About Save the Rhino International Save the Rhino International works to conserve genetically viable populations of critically endangered rhinoceros species in the wild. We do this by fundraising for and making grants to rhino- and community-based conservation projects in Africa and Asia. UK Charity Registration No. 1035072 About Wilderness Wildlife Trust The Botswana Rhino Reintroduction Project is a true success story: Collaborative conservation efforts between Wilderness Safaris, Wilderness Wilderness Trust, Botswana’s Department of Wildlife (DWNP) and the Botswana Government have realised a dream with the successful reintroduction of black and white rhino into the wilds of the Okavango Delta. Enter rhino charity raffle to win a safari
  24. This has come up before in the Zakouma articles thread but I thought I would add a new thread for anyone in the UK who may have missed it. On the 14th of Sept between 19:00 and 21:00 at the Royal Geographic Society in London (1 Kensington Gore, London, SW7 2AR) Le Directeur of Zakouma National Park Rian Labuschagne will be giving a lecture discussing the success story of elephant conservation in Zakouma National Park in Chad and the future for conservation. The event has been organised by Steppes Travel if anyone is interested in going you can purchase tickets from their website, the tickets are £15 (or £10 if you’re an RGS member) and all proceeds go to African Parks. Despite knowing about this for a little while I’ve only just bought my ticket so there no doubt still tickets available for anyone else who is interested in attending. Is anyone else going?
  25. Hi everyone I'm one of the authors of the various Lonely Planet guides to Kenya, Tanzania, East Africa, Ethiopia and other areas (new, and expanded editions of all the East Africa books out this week).However, that's not what this post is about. Instead, I wanted to tell you all a little bit about a major project I'm currently engaged in and that might be of interest to users of these forums. Over the course of May-June 2015 (so yeah I am already a short way into it) I will walk, with a Maasai companion, across part of the Maasai lands of Kenya. The walk started from the eastern edge of Kenya’s remote Loita Hills and is running to the western edge of the Mara North conservancy, part of the greater Masai Mara ecosystem. Along the way I am staying in, and visiting, as many Maasai villages as possible as well as meeting and talking to a whole host of people involved in conservation and tourism in that area. The result of the walk will be a book about about the walk, contemporary Maasai life and wildlife conservation in East Africa today. A second book will be a coffee table photo book filled with portraits and reportage photos from the walk and my other East African trips. There will also be a range of magazine features and a large online and social media presence. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, I, and I hope my Maasai companion, will be doing a speaking tour through the UK, France and Kenya talking in schools and public venues about East African conservation. I am providing very frequent blog updates on the dedicated project website - www.walkingwiththemaasai.com and there's a dedicated Facebook page which some of you might be interested in following: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Walking-with-the-Maasai/421479961339808?ref=hl I hope a few of you find it interesting and enjoyable enough to want to follow the project. Thank you Stuart Butler

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