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Found 7 results

  1. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/13/science/parasites-extinction-climate-change.html "Recently, scientists carried out the first large-scale study of what climate change may do to the world’s much-loathed parasites. The team came to a startling conclusion: as many as one in three parasite species may face extinction in the next century. As global warming raises the planet’s temperature, the researchers found, many species will lose territory in which to survive. Some of their hosts will be lost, too. “It still absolutely blows me away,” said Colin J. Carlson, lead author of the study and a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. He knows many people may react to the news with a round of applause. “Parasites are obviously a hard sell,” Mr. Carlson said. But as much as a tapeworm or a blood fluke may disgust us, parasites are crucial to the world’s ecosystems. Their extinction may effect entire food webs, perhaps even harming human health. Parasites deserve some of the respect that top predators have earned in recent decades. Wolves were once considered vermin, for example — but as they disappeared, ecosystems changed. Scientists realized that as top predators, wolves kept populations of prey in check, which allowed plants to thrive. When wolves were restored to places like Yellowstone, local ecosystems revived, as well."
  2. PEER J published the great elephant census report so I put myself on their email list this came from them recently quoting briefly a popular report https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/vbbpk4/hunt-moose-to-save-caribou-that-are-killed-by-wolves-scientists-say Caribou are facing a lot of threats. On top of hunting and habitat destruction, invasive species play a large role in the caribou's decline, according to Robert Serrouya, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta. Managing these species, including moose and white-tailed deer, could also be the key to stabilizing the caribou population, according to his new study published in PeerJ. in it there was a link to another story and a SCIENCE ADVANCES article http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/advances/3/4/e1601365.full.pdf
  3. Kodiak brown bears are abandoning salmon-their iconic prey-due to climate change, according to a new study. The bears are more interested in chowing down on early-arriving red elderberries. The likely result of this "prey switch," the researchers conclude, is a disrupted ecosystem on Alaska's Kodiak Island. birds that depend on bears pulling salmon out of the stream, could be seriously affected, Other far-reaching effects may include changes in bear demographics due to the change in their diet, evolving salmon populations and impacts on plant pollinators. This overlap in their resources forces the bears to make a choice that could in the long run result in fewer bears and/or unexpected changes in ecosystem structure," Stanford said. report continues William W. Deacy, Jonathan B. Armstrong, William B. Leacock, Charles T. Robbins, David D. Gustine, Eric J. Ward, Joy A. Erlenbach, Jack A. Stanford. Phenological synchronization disrupts trophic interactions between Kodiak brown bears and salmon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201705248 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1705248114 William W. Deacy, Jonathan B. Armstrong, William B. Leacock, Charles T. Robbins, David D. Gustine, Eric J. Ward, Joy A. Erlenbach, Jack A. Stanford. Phenological synchronization disrupts trophic interactions between Kodiak brown bears and salmon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201705248 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1705248114 this has been observed since 2014, the berries appear earlier and attract the bears we are messing with this with uncertain results
  4. http://www.sajs.co.za/implications-summer-breeding-frogs-langebaanweg-south-africa-regional-climate-evolution-5-1-mya/thalassa-matthews-g-john-measey-david-l-roberts https://phys.org/news/2017-06-frog-fossils-patterns-south-africa.html https://theconversation.com/frog-fossils-tell-us-something-new-about-rain-patterns-on-south-africas-west-coast-78420 ~ This September, 2016 research article published in the South African Journal of Science presents findings of a study of fossil frog species, including analysis of the history of winter rainfall in the arid west coast of South Africa.
  5. http://www.france24.com/en/20151023-global-warming-threatens-iconic-snow-leopard ~ This article, from France 24, presents the findings of a World Wildlife Fund study of snow leopards. It notes that a rising tree line limits habitat options for already threatened snow leopards. Approximately one-fifth of snow leopards have died in recent years. Ongoing research will include monitoring by camera traps and selective use of collars.
  6. "...In July 2015 the journal Science published Kerr et al’s Climate Change Impacts On Bumblebees Converge Across Continents.It was a woeful analysis hyped by the media. It did very little to further our understanding of the causes of bumblebee declines and more likely obscured the real problems. But it did illustrate why the public is becoming increasingly suspicious of “scientific claims” regards catastrophic climate change as well as demonstrating the inadequacy of the peer review process...." http://perhapsallnatural.blogspot.com/2015/07/plight-of-bumble-bees-how-shabby.html
  7. http://www.un.org/africarenewal/web-features/critical-link-between-resource-plunder-and-illegal-trade-wildlife This article appeared recently in a uniyed nations publication it also refers to Africa progress report http://www.africaprogresspanel.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/APP_APR2014_24june.pdf Climate change adaption report http://www.unep.org/pdf/AfricaAdapatationGapreport.pdf

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