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Found 9 results

  1. Following on from @@pomkiwi excellent report of their trip here is the story of our first visit to South America. Being avid African fans we knew the trip would probably not include a lot of wildlife but we were quite impressed with the animals and birds we saw but even more so by the astounding scenery. After a lot of research we decided to use Argentina as the destination country rather than Chile and made all our transfers in and out of Buenos Aires. We got an excellent Business Class fare that was almost the same price as Premium Economy! We flew from London to Buenos Aires via Amsterdam with KLM and arrived at 8am on 19 February 2017. We used the Mine Hotel in Palermo Soho as our base in Buenos Aires for the trip returning there before our visit to the Iguazu Falls and again at the end for a three day stay which allowed us to explore Buenos Aires at a more leisurely pace. A great little hotel. We were able to leave luggage there as the flight to El Calafate and onward to Bariloche had a reduced luggage allowance compared to our international flights. We had booked our trip ourselves, as we usually do, and planned a week in southern Patagonia, 12 nights in the Argentinian/Chilean Lake District especially to see the active volcanoes and 3 nights in Brazil at the Iguazu Falls. Booking the accommodation, hiring the cars and communications were very easy despite our lack of Spanish. Everyone spoke excellent English and we felt very welcome everywhere. The following morning we flew to El Calafate and picked up our hire car. We planned a trip into Chile where we would stay in Torres del Paine NP. First of all we put a day aside to visit the Perito Moreno Glacier which is only 100kms or so from El Calafate. We used Posada Karut Josh as our base in El Calafate, at only US$ 60 per night B&B it is a beautiful little family run place, and the host Frederico cooks amazing food. After a good nights rest we set off for the glacier. A fuel shortage in town caused some anxiety as we knew if we made the 200km round trip we might not have enough fuel to get to Chile the next day. Fingers crossed it would all work out we set off. It was wonderful to be self driving on a new continent and the roads were well maintained and easy. We soon started seeing snow covered mountains in the distance. The sun was shining, the sky blue and there was hardly any other vehicles on the road. A stop on the way delivered our first Caracara, a very relaxed and photogenic bird.
  2. Ever since venturing to South America and the Brazilian Pantanal a few years ago (there's a 2010 trip report on here somewhere) I've had a hankering to go back. The goal then was jaguars and tapirs, but really any of the amazing wildlife of South America was on my list. I had visited the Peruvian Amazon years before, and then the Galapagos Islands in 1991, but my trip to Brazil left the lingering impression that if I wanted that "big game" feel that I get in Africa and India, then I needed to get back to the Pantanal! I had used Carlos Grandes and Pantanal Ecoexplorers in 2010 to organize the trip, and me and some buddies took the less traveled path to the Paraguay River and the Taiama Jaguar Reserve. It was adventurous for sure and we had a great time camping along the shore of the river across from a huge wood stork and roseate spoonbill rookery (noisy!) and our goal of seeing jaguars was realized with a fleeting glimpse of a female poking her head out of the reeds and disappearing moments later (but not before we snapped a quick picture!)...needless to say, I wanted more! (As a pretty important side note, I reached out to Carlos again to organize my trip to the Pantanal but the entire trip for me was dependent upon receiving a work bonus---when I finally got confirmation about a month prior to when I wanted to depart (I was in a race against time for jaguar "season" was wrapping up in late October) he had disappeared off Facebook and his website was down...I was forced to frantically begin contacting other potential organizers and learned when I was in the Pantanal that he had skipped the country and left a number of folks high and dry! Lodge owners, guides and tourist deposits! I was pretty shocked because my trip in 2010 went perfectly well, but I dodged a bullet apparently!! So, as I said, I was waiting for the green light on my bonus which gave me about 30 days to book flights and my trip. I googled cheap flights and bought them one at a time---a TAM flight from Orlando to Sao Paulo direct---a round trip Sao Paulo to Cuiaba on Gol---a Qatar flight direct to Buenos Aires---then a round trip to Trelew on Aerolineas Argentinas. The thought occurred to me that I might buy all of these single leg flights and get stuck in South America on the last one to the US! But I found a reasonable flight on Avianca back to Florida. I was able to join a small group staying at the Pantanal Jaguar Camp, two independent couple from the UK for a three night stay. So upon arrival in Cuiaba I had to stay one night at the Amazon Plaza (curious name for a hotel in the gateway city to the Pantanal but I digress) and then Pantanal Nature took it from there! They picked me up from my hotel, then two more stops at the hotels where the other travelers were staying and we were off... The Transpantaneira Highway was a safari unto itself....we had barely pulled out of Pocone under the famous sign and onto the dirt road before we were stopped by a yellow anaconda stretching across our "lane"...rather that twist and slither like I assumed all snakes did, this one was content to ripple his belly muscles and move in a long straight line across the road in no particular hurry...we piled out of the car and watched it make its way into the brush on the other side of the road. We were at times way-layed by groups of capybara and the occasional agouti. Even some caracaras picking apart a brilliant green snake. The sloughs along the side of the road were teeming with birds of all kinds and caimans by the score. Kingfishers were perched on the telephone wires and nosiy parakeets occupied these great shaggy nests in the palms. We crossed dozens of rickety bridges (there seems to be some effort to replacing the wooden ones with concrete ones) some so bad off we drove around them! We stopped off somewhere along the way for a pit stop but the overall trip to Pantanal Jaguar Camp took about five hours I'd guess... Pantanal Jaguar Camp and Pantanal Nature is owned by Ailton Lara. He has made a real comfortable place on the edge of the wilderness. Accommodations were basic, but clean and with AC. The food was excellent. I would definitely stay there again and highly recommend it. Ailton was doing an exploratory guided trip to a very wild area further to the south with a visitor that had been multiple times to visit the Pantanal. I wish I could remember the name of the national park but it had mountains and was beautiful. He arrived our second day and was a great host, serenading us with pantaneiro (cowboy) songs after dinner one night. Porto Jofre is not cheap because simply put, it's the best place in the world to see and observe jaguars...that's what you're paying for...a pair of hyacinth macaws visited us twice during our stay---such a charismatic bird! As an aside, the Pantanal is on par with Africa when it comes to bird watching...in fact, it may surpass it with it's toucans and macaws, rheas and jabiru storks and roseate spoonbills!
  3. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/23/buenos-aires-zoo-close-animals-captivity-argentina ~ This article from the U.K. Guardian tells of the decision to close the 140-year old Buenos Aires, Argentina Zoo. Buenos Aires Mayor Horacio Rodríguez Larreta stated that “This situation of captivity is degrading for the animals, it's not the way to take care of them”. The zoo's 2500 animals will be gradually dispersed in Argentina's existing nature reserves, with infirm older animals remaining on the site. The zoo will become an ecopark intended to teach children about caring for animals.
  4. The last newsletter of the CLT project in the Ibera wetlands. http://www.proyectoibera.org/download/boletines/boletin_24.pdf
  5. I have been traveling three times in the last months to the Mata Atlantica in South America. The first trip was in the Misiones Province of Argentina to visit the Selva Misionera or Selva Paranense close to the famous Iguazu Falls, which is the name given to the Mata Atlantica rainforest in Northern Argentina. I stayed in two private reserves and ecolodge and then visited the Iguazu Falls. Have a look at the reviews of Surucua and San Sebastian de la Selva where I stayed: http://safaritalk.net/topic/15321-surucua-lodge-misiones-argentina/ http://safaritalk.net/topic/15322-san-sebastian-de-la-selva-misiones-argentina/ Selva Misionera by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr Carpintero Arco Iris by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr The second trip was in the dry semi-deciduous forest in the Fazenda Bacury, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Yellow-billed tern by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr The third and last trip was much shorter. I had a short visit of the golden lion tamarins after 4 days on the beaches of Cabo Frio, Buzios and Cabo do Arrail just East to Rio de Janeiro. Micao leao dourado by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr
  6. 1) Name of property and country: (Please also include name of property and country as topic title and include as tags as well) San Sebastian de la Selva 2) Website address if known: http://www.sansebastiandelaselva.com 3) Date of stay, including whether Green Season, Shoulder season or High season pricing (if known). July 2015 4) Length of stay: 3 nights 5) Why did you choose this camp or lodge to stay in? Based upon what? Birding, Selva Misionera, Photography, Conservation. 6) How did you book the property, direct or agent? Were your enquiries dealt with quickly and efficiently? Directly through San Sebastian website. Very efficient and quick answers from Matias Romano and Ramon Reyes, two argentinean photographers who bought an old farm inside a corridor between two provincial reserves to conserve and recuperate the area. If Matias is on away from home (he goes to remote areas of the country to guide clients), it could take further time to get an answer. 7) How many times have you been on Safari? It was not a proper safari as it was in South America. 8) To which countries? Bolivia, Chile, India, Nepal... 9) Which properties have you been to previously that you are comparing this one to? Surucua, Argentina. Both lodges are in the same area. Very nice areas, very good locations for birders. San Sebastian property is an old cattle farm in recuperation inside an ecological corridor between Urugua-i and Foerster provincial reserves. Capibaras are found around the dam on the property, just outside the lodge. 10) Was the camp/lodge fenced? No. 11) What tent or room did you stay in? Did it have a good view? Was it overlooked or private? We stayed in a Private house 200 meters away from the main building. There are also private rooms inside the main building. 12) How comfortable was the bed - were suitable amounts of blankets/duvets/pillows provided? The bed was quite comfortable. The blankets are available for winter (from June to September). 13) Did you like the food? If yes, please state why. If no, please state why. Yes, the food was excellent. There is too much food, fresh salads from the garden. Staying too long at San Sebastian is certainly not so good!!!! 14) Was there a varied menu offering multiple choice? If vegetarian was a suitable alternative offered? (Did you have to request this in advance?) Unique menu but availability of different meals. I guess you can eat veg if asked. 15) Can you choose where you eat, ie privately or with other guests, guides? Single tables or communal dining? Yes you can decide to eat with other guests or on single tables. It's up to you. 16) How good were the packed breakfasts/lunches if staying out on game drives? You always go back at the lodge for lunch as far as I know. 17) What are the game drive vehicles? Please include photo if possible. By foot. 18) How many guests per row? - 19) How long were the game drives and were they varied in the routes taken? About 3 hours birding per mooring/afternoon. 20) Are game drive times flexible: ie, if agreed in advance, can you go out earlier than suggested and stay out later, ie not returning for lunch but taking supplies with you? If you decide to go with Nene or Gaston to walk on the trails of the property, I guess you can go out at the time you want depending if there are other guests. Anyway, it is not compulsory going on the trails with the guides, so you can go there when you want. 21) What wildlife is this property known for? Did you get good sightings? Birding, Selva Misionera birds. Capibaras are everywhere around the lodge. There is a feeding platform where you can take some of the best pictures from endemic species from the Selva Misionera. The best place for bird photographers in Misiones. 22) How was the standard of guiding? Excellent. Néné (Omar is his real name) is the San Sebastian reserve and lodge manager. He is also a honorary rangers for the Argentinean protected areas of Misiones Province. I have been highly impressed by his commitment to conserve the Misiones Rainforest. His knowledge is outstanding. He is a really good guide. He recently contracted Gaston to help for guiding and protecting San Sebastian. Gaston recently finished is formation of rangers. Respectful playback is used to get the birds close to the clients. 23) If you had a bad experience with a guide, why? Did you report the issue to management, and if so, how did they deal with the issue? N/A 24) If you had a very good experience with your guide, please give reasons why: Great. 25) Were staff attentive to your requests/needs? Yes. 26) Does the property support a local community conservation initiative. If so, please provide brief details and website address if known. The property is inside an ecological corridor between two protected areas of the Misiones Province, which means while staying at the reserve you are directly helping the forest and the corridor. Old pastures of the property are slowly regenerating. In 20-30 more years it will be a secondary rainforest. Nene is also the manager of another private reserves inside the corridor. He is also ensuring monitoring through camera traps of the 3 ecological faunal crossing under and over the nearby road. 27) Safaritalk trip report link: LINK 28) Any other pertinent details you wish to add: 29) Please add your photographs of the property below, with headings.
  7. 1) Name of property and country: (Please also include name of property and country as topic title and include as tags as well) Surucua Reserva & EcoLodge 2) Website address if known: http://www.surucua.com 3) Date of stay, including whether Green Season, Shoulder season or High season pricing (if known). July 2015 4) Length of stay: 2 nights 5) Why did you choose this camp or lodge to stay in? Based upon what? Birding, palmito riverine forest, manakins. 6) How did you book the property, direct or agent? Were your enquiries dealt with quickly and efficiently? Directly through Surucua website. Very efficient and quick answers. Sometimes there are some problems with the net so that the owners Adrian and Laura need 2-3 days to answer from Andresito village. 7) How many times have you been on Safari? It was not a proper safari as it was in South America. 8) To which countries? Bolivia, Chile, India, Nepal... 9) Which properties have you been to previously that you are comparing this one to? San Sebastian de la Selva, Argentina. Both lodges are in the same area. Very nice areas, very good locations for birders. Surucua is located inside the rainforest, some caciques nesting just over the main building. 10) Was the camp/lodge fenced? No. 11) What tent or room did you stay in? Did it have a good view? Was it overlooked or private? Private rooms 100 meters away from the main building. No view as it is inside the rainforest. 12) How comfortable was the bed - were suitable amounts of blankets/duvets/pillows provided? The bed was quite comfortable. The blankets are available for winter (from June to September). 13) Did you like the food? If yes, please state why. If no, please state why. Yes, the food was excellent, local cuisine, local ingredients. Breakfast was really nice, plentiful. 14) Was there a varied menu offering multiple choice? If vegetarian was a suitable alternative offered? (Did you have to request this in advance?) Unique menu. You are asked while booking if you have any special requirements (vegetarian, meals you dislike). I told them I did not eat meat from Brasil or Paraguay due to its impacts on deforestation. 15) Can you choose where you eat, ie privately or with other guests, guides? Single tables or communal dining? Yes you can decide to eat with other guests or on single tables. It's up to you. 16) How good were the packed breakfasts/lunches if staying out on game drives? You always go back at the lodge for lunch as far as I know. 17) What are the game drive vehicles? Please include photo if possible. By foot. 18) How many guests per row? - 19) How long were the game drives and were they varied in the routes taken? About 3 hours birding per mooring/afternoon. Night walk in the forest is about an hour. 20) Are game drive times flexible: ie, if agreed in advance, can you go out earlier than suggested and stay out later, ie not returning for lunch but taking supplies with you? If you decide to go with Adrian to walk on the trails of the property, I guess you can go out at the time you want depending if there are other guests. Anyway, it is not compulsory going on the trails with Adrian or other guides, so you can go there when you want. 21) What wildlife is this property known for? Did you get good sightings? Birding, Selva Misionera birds. Well known for manakins. Very nice sightings, a bit challenging for photographing compared to San Sebastian de la Selva which provides are feeding platform. Pictures are taken in the jungle. Professional flash highly recommended as the jungle is quite dark. 22) How was the standard of guiding? Excellent. Adrian knows very well the birds from the area. Playback is widely used to make the birds come closer to the clients. 23) If you had a bad experience with a guide, why? Did you report the issue to management, and if so, how did they deal with the issue? N/A 24) If you had a very good experience with your guide, please give reasons why: Adrian is really professional, He knows very week the species of the Selva Misionera. He knows where to find the different species, the different manakin leks... At the lodge, Laura is really king, always worried that all is alright for you. It is a pleasure to be received by this lovely couple 25) Were staff attentive to your requests/needs? Yes. 26) Does the property support a local community conservation initiative. If so, please provide brief details and website address if known. Private property inside the buffer area of Iguazu National Park (Paraje Peninsula). It protects the rainforest in the lodge and hosts different scientific investigations. 27) Safaritalk trip report link: LINK 28) Any other pertinent details you wish to add: 29) Please add your photographs of the property below, with headings. Selva Misionera by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr _JG03448 by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr _JG03452 by Goulevitch Jérémie, sur Flickr
  8. Today I would like to share with you the projects led by by Tompkins Conservation, that have great plans for Chile and Argentina. Douglas Tompkins is the founder of North Face and co-founder of the Esprit firm. As a climber, he found in love with Patagonia and realized the need to conserve one of the last pristine area of the world. He them sold all is actions and started to dedicate his life in environment. He and his wife are woking through different local organizations in a set of projects, restoring and conserving huge patch of lands, and then donate them to Chilean and Argentinean governments provided that they manage them as national parks. Here are some of the projects led by this unique philanthropist man. CHILE 1- Pumalin National Park, Chilean Patagonia. In the 90's the Chilean government decided to sell huge patch of land of pristine wilderness in Northern Patagonia. Tompkins bought slowly but surely lands in there, making a hug he private reserve called Pumalin Park. http://www.parquepumalin.cl It protects nearly 3.000 km2 of pristine valdivian forests, glacial lakes and granite peaks. The park is just South to the Hornopiren National Park and directly linked to Corcovado National Park to the South. Pumalin protects one of the most pristine valdivian (cold humid forest) of the world, habitat of the discrete native pudu and the lion of the Andes also called puma. The Pumalin Foundation made a red of trails through the park, established different entrance gates with rangers control points. Local Tourism developed a lot as well as craftwork, the foundation restored old farms and transformed them in really nice hotels. Sadly the Chilean government still refuse to accept the donation for political silly reasons. Some people say the park cuts the state of Chile in two different parts. The Chilean government is currently working in a road crossing the private park. I hope Pumalin will soon be eventually donated to the state, it is one of the most precious protected area of Chile. 2- Corcovado National Park This national park was created in 2015 through donations of roughly 800 km2 from Conservation Land Trust, one of the local NGO foundation created by Tompkins. It protects pristine valdivian forests and important wetlands areas on the shores of the Corcovado gulf on the Pacific Coast. There are no easy access to the park, the government does not promote this touristic destination on that date. http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/corcovado.htm A really nice book was published last year about the park, it can be found in the USA. 3- Yendegaia National Park Tompkins pushed the creation of this amazing national park that share its eastern border with Tierra de Fuego Argentine Park, donating lands of a former sheep estancia. This park was created less than a year ago, it will be able to visit as the army is currently building a road to establish a control on the Southern shores of Tierra del Fuego. The park protects peatlands and other important wetlands, as well as huge glaciers form the Darwin Range. It is located just East of the enormous Agostini National Park. http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/yendegaia.htm The park northern can be discovered by boat. Expedición Fitzroy offers amazing cruises out there. http://www.patagoniaphotosafaris.com It is also posible to organize a trip sallying from Ushuaia or Puerto Williams on the Isla Navarino Island. I let you some few website, but there many other french-owned agencies based on Ushuaia http://www.croisieres-boulard.com/index.php?page=accueil http://www.espritequipe.com 4- Melimoyu Peninsula and Isla Magdalena Another project of Tompkins located in the valdivian forests of Northern Patagonia. http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/melimoyu_isla_magdalena.htm A marine park was established a year ago in the Bahia Tic Toc, one the patagonia sounds marine hotspots. Blue whales come in the bay to feed before going North close to the ecuador. This unique ecosystem only exists in Southern New Zealand and Northern Patagonia. http://chile.panda.org/?216897/Con-nuevo-Parque-Marino-Tic-Toc-Chile-da-un-paso-decisivo-en-la-conservacin-de-su-mar-y-de-especies-emblemticas-como-la-ballena-azul http://2010-2014.gob.cl/especiales/parque-marino-tic-toc/ There a few small companies organizing cruises in the area to discover these fabulous landscapes: http://www.guaitecas.com/web/ Photographic expedition: http://abtao.cl/site/2014/08/18/3o-taller-fotografico-la-travesia-de-los-chonos-marzo-2015/ 5- Cabo Leon estancia It aims to protect good sub-antartict forest close to the Alacalufe National Reserve on Riesco Island, Southern Patagonia. A short descripción form CLT website: http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/cabo_leon.htm This extremely rugged and wild landscape is now fully protected for its wilderness values, but could eventually be repatriated to public ownership. Some conservationists in the region have suggested that Cabo Leon should be donated to the state of Chile for addition to the adjacent Alacalufe Reserve, which would then be upgraded to national park status. If such an outcome came to pass, the resulting national park would be one of the largest protected areas in South America—a phenomenal new wilderness area exceeding six million acres—and a major addition to Chile’s national park system. 7- Patagonia National Park project Tompkins wife works on the creation of a huge national park in Aysen region. She bought the former sheep estancia Chacabuco and then restored the land and created a red of trails and refuges for tourists. The place is now opened for tourism but the oficial opening will be programed when the foundation Conservation Patagonica will finish the restoration processes. This private reserve protects one the major population of Southern Andean deer or huemul of the world. It protects pampa as well as valdivian forests. Guanacos, Darwin rhea as well as pumas can be founds in this reserve just North of the Baker river, that was lastly saved from a devastating dam project. The aim is to develop tourism and transform Aysen as the main touristic destination of Patagonia, through Parque National Patagonia creation. The idea is to donate the 1000 km2 extension to the state and manage the Jeinimeni and Tamango reserves as a single unit under National Park status to enhance protection. http://www.conservacionpatagonica.org/home.htm http://www.patagoniapark.org ARGENTINA 1- Monte Leon National Park This patagonian coastal park of 600 km2 was built from a donation of Conservation Patagonica in 2002. It protects representative magellan penguins and sea lion colonies. It is the only piece of patagonia coastal landscape under protection in Argentina. Guanacos roam the pampa while pumas hide in the rocky canyons of the park. A photographic book has recently been published about the park and can be found in the USA. http://www.conservacionpatagonica.org/aboutus_otrs.htm 2- El Rincon Estancia (Perito Moreno National Park) A small piece of land was donated last year to the argentinean government and added to the Perito Moreno National Park http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/el_rincon.htm The land protects restores pampa grasslands on the flank of the mighty San Lorenzo summit. 3- Ibera National Park This is the master piece of conservation of CLT in Argentina. They have huge plans for the Ibera wetlands based on restoration and conservation. The Ibera wetlands are the second largest wetlands of the world just after Pantanal. Well the rank is not really significant, I even think the Moxos wetlands in the Beni region of Bolivia are much bigger than Ibera. What is important is that it is one of the last wild and pristine place in North-East Argentina. There is currently a nature reserve formed of public and private lands. CLT bought some private former ranches and restored them. They have amazing reintroduction plans. Two giant ant-eaters have been established in the Ibera. Pampa deers habitat have been secured in the Aguapey region, while another population has been established on San Alonso island. They are currently working on a reproduction center in San Alonso for jaguars. The final aim of this project will be the reintroduction of the big cat in the Ibera. They have also plan to reintroduce collared peccaries as well as giant otters and tapirs in the Ibera. The process will take time and eventually the 1500 km2 protected by CLT will be donated to the state to make a huge 7000 km2 national park competing with the brazilian Pantanal. It will be on the circuit of the Northern Argentine protected areas with the Impenetrable and Iguazu national parks. http://www.proyectoibera.org/eng/ http://www.parquenacionalibera.org 4- Parque Nacional el Impenetrable Declared in late 2014 expropriating the herders of a huge estancia in the Chaco region, CLT made an important donation to finance the creation of the lands to the state. An important step has be done to protect the jaguar in Argentina. I think they will have to reintroduce jaguars in there in the future through the jaguar reproduction center located in the Ibera. Please find another post there: http://safaritalk.net/topic/13596-new-argentine-national-park-el-impenetrable/ GENERAL Here are the links of Tompkins Conservation and CLT http://www.tompkinsconservation.org/home.htm http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/our_mission.htm Other links about the restoration and species recovery programs led by this couple of philanthropists. Only wish they were much more people like them on earth... http://www.tompkinsconservation.org/wildlife_recovery.htm http://www.tompkinsconservation.org/landscape_restoration.htm
  9. For those interested int the creation of the Impenetrable National Park in the core area of the Chaco ecosystem. Perhaps the last hope to save jaguars of the chacoan region. http://proyectoyaguarete.com.ar/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Manual-PN-El-Impenetrable-versión-final.pdf This park has been created few months ago expropriating a huge farm called la Fidelidad between Formosa and Chaco states of Northern Argentina. Only the part South of the Bermejo river in the Chaco park have been declared as a national park, it urges declaring the part North to the Bermejo river as a reserve or any other king of protection. El Impenetrable protects is the last pristine patch of chacoan habitat in a region where deforestation is severe, replacing native trees by soja farms. It is perhaps the last place where the jaguar survives in Northern Argentina apart from the yunga landscapes in Jujuy and Salta states, and Misiones states close to Iguazu falls. Here is a documentary concerning the jaguar situation in Argentina: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnELYyqzP7c#t=27 Only 3 sub-populations survive today: - a small binational populations in Misiones with less than 50 jaguars as a global number in the ecosystem. A corridor still exist along the Parana river but Iguazu National Park is surrounded by farms, the area was devastated during WWII to supply Europe in timber. - a 150 jaguars population in the tropical humid mountain forests of Salta and Jujuy in North West Argentina. This area is quite wild but jaguars kill on cattle generating conflict with farmers. The population is connected with Bolivian yungas. - Less than 20 jaguars might still survive in the Chaco, but in 10 years research, scientist have never seen any. Jaguar only occupy 10% of their historic distribution in Argentina. Jaguars used to be until Rio Negro in Northern Patagonia, 1500 km south to their southernmost current population. Jaguars used to kill on guanacos and pampa deers, the first one has almost disappeared in its northern distribution while the second one that was thriving by millions in the past from San Luis to the North, is almost extirpated from Argentina. Only 4 sub-populations survive with less than 2000 animals between Buenos Aires, Santa Fe, San Luis and Corrientes. Conservation Land Trust is leading an interesting initiative to reintroduce jaguars in the Ibera swamp ecosystem from zoos' animals. They are working on establishing a firth population of pampa deers in Corrientes state and have reintroduced two populations of giant anteaters in the Ibera wetlands. http://www.theconservationlandtrust.org/eng/our_mission.htm

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