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Found 2 results

  1. I've just finished reading an article about worldwide conservation. it's a very long piece, but I persevered and ploughing through helped me link all the otherwise befuddling arguments provided about conservation. It is an objective look at how two approaches to conservation have helped, or not helped, wildlife and nature conservation. here's the link: https://news.mongabay.com/2016/04/big-conservation-gone-astray/?n3wsletter extracting a quote from the article: By Mongabay reporter Jeremy Hance "Borneo, one of the most biodiverse landscapes on the planet, is in ecological crisis. The Bornean rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni) — a subspecies of the Sumatran — is on the knife’s edge of extinction; less than 2,000 Bornean pygmy elephants (Elephas maximus borneensis) survive; and the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), distinct from the great ape in Sumatra, is being killed by people at a rate as high 4,000 a year. For the possibly hundreds of thousands of other species living on the island much less is known, but their homes — their forests — are falling at one of the highest rates in the world."
  2. Reports The Nature Conservancy in Africa on their Facebook page. David Banks, Managing Director TNC Africa writes: To read the review, (online PDF document), click here.

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