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Found 43 results

  1. I have been a bit reluctant to start this trip report because there have been so many excellent reports out of Zambia and specifically South Luangwa lately...will folks really be keen to read another? And what can I say that will be different? Well, as it turns out, my husband and I had a bit of a different take on this safari destination...perhaps our expectations were too high, or we chose the wrong camps, or we just got unlucky...but in the end we both agreed that OVERALL it was our least satisfying safari experience to date. But all is not negative...far from it. We certainly had some excellent and memorable sightings, and in retrospect there's no such thing as a truly "bad" safari, as just being out in the bush is wonderful...and far better than sitting around at home dreaming of Africa....but given that this was also our most costly safari to date, we just felt it didn't deliver as we expected. I will add right up front that we absolutely loved Lower Zambezi...and in fact much preferred our time there over South Luangwa. What!! I hear everyone exclaiming Well, keep reading to see why. We traveled Aug 31-September 14. Our itinerary was: 4 nights Lower Zambezi at Amanzi Camp 3 nights South Luangwa at Bilimungwe Camp 4 nights South Luangwa at Tena Tena Camp 3 nights Victoria Falls at the Avani Hotel I had heard so much about South Luangwa, and read so many excellent trip reports, with so many people stating it as their favorite park in Africa, that I knew this had to be our next safari destination. We had considered it years ago when we were planning a November trip, but chickened out due to the heat, and decided at that time we wouldn't go unless we could go in peak season, before "suicide season." I was also excited by the idea of the walking-focus of the park, and was keen to finally get out of the vehicle and explore by foot, after so many stuck-in-vehicle safaris. I had imaginings of the thrill of coming upon wild dogs on foot, or elephants...maybe I was getting these ideas more from Mana Pools trips, but somehow I thought it would be similar. Well, that didn't happen...more on that later. As for Lower Zambezi, I was attracted by the option of doing some boating activities...which I find so relaxing...and seeing the contrast with SLNP. Even though others had said sightings weren't as good there as in SLNP...we felt if we were coming all this way we should at least check it out. So glad we did! Everything was booked through Bill Given at The Wild Source. Originally in South Luangwa I had hoped to stay at Kaingo, mainly for their focus on photography and their hides, but it was way out of our budget in high season. Fortunately, we were able to get some specials: four nights for the price of three at Amanzi and also at Tena Tena. Our original itinerary didn't include Victoria Falls, as we were already topping out our budget; and this time of year the falls would not be at their best; but several months after booking (and just before buying our air tickets) I just decided to go for it...when I realized we could fly directly home from Livingstone on South African Airways at no additional cost from flying home from Lusaka. I'm glad we did. We enjoyed being at the falls, had some adventures (stay tuned ), and those last few days took a bit of the sting out of our experiences in SLNP. The long tiring trip from JFK to JNB to Lusaka went smoothly on South African Airways, and we easily made the connection to our ProFlight fight to Jeki airstrip in Lower Zambezi National Park. Of course, as always, all my fears about overweight camera bags were for naught...camera bags weren't weighed and somehow everything gets crammed in, either in the back of the plane or under-seat. We were on our way! We were met at Jeki by our guide Lawrence, who told us that the drive would be around 1-1/2 hours to camp--that is, if we didn't stop. Since we arrived at Jeki at around 4:30, we knew we wouldn't arrive at camp until dark. But what we never dreamed of was how productive this very first drive would be! We stopped a lot I didn't take many photos initially as the light was fading and we were traveling a bit quickly to get to camp. We passed a very large herd of buffalo in the open grasslands near the airstrip, and some zebras, but as we got further away from Jeki the terrain started to change dramatically, and we entered into deep forest. Its here that things started to get interesting. It was getting quite dark by now, when Lawrence spotted something.... He seemed very wary...but not of us... Lawrence thought there must be lions around, and sure enough, shortly we heard some distant roars. The light was dimming, we stayed watching the leopard...would the lions get closer? Soon the spotlight came out... I was thrilled to be getting my dream shots...leopard on a termite mound...at night...what a start!! Shortly after this, the leopard got up and walked towards the distant trees...we followed a bit but he entered the forest, over a gully we couldn't cross, and we really needed to get to camp. So we started back to the main road. But not before we found the lions who had been causing the leopard such anxiety! There were a pair of two magnificent males! We stayed with them for a while but eventually had to get to camp...dinner was long awaiting. But there was to be one last exciting sighting..... A life mammal! Wow, Lower Zambezi had delivered in spades already and we hadn't even seen it in daylight yet! Soon we arrived at camp, and we couldn't see much of it in the dark, but we were already thrilled with our choice of Amanzi.
  2. This is part Two of my 2017 safari. 5 Nights at Nsefu Camp & 2 Nights at Luangwa River Camp. Part One Shenton Safaris Kaingo & Mwamba camps can be found here At the height of the dry season the transfer between Kaingo & Nsefu camp must be amongst the shortest in all of Africa. It went something like this... Walk through Kaingo camp to the office area, then down on to the river bed where I'm met by my retinue. A game scout, 2 luggage bearers and a number of other camp staff along for the stroll. Cross the sand to the water's edge, remove sandals, wade into river (the water is never more than knee deep and delightfully warm and the mud squishy under foot), up onto a sandbar and repeat two times. I'm now standing on the other side of the river. A few goodbyes and I say hello to Julius one of the RPS guides stationed at Nsefu camp. Julius & I climb aboard the RPS vehicle. He reverses a few metres before changing into low range first and we climb a steep section of the river bank then turn right onto the river side track and follow it a few kilometres downstream and we arrive at Nsefu camp. Transfer done and dusted in approx 10 minutes. Yvonne the temporary camp manager offers me a drink and shows me the camp's hide whilst my luggage is taken to my room. In the hide I survey the waterhole and some movement catches my eye. I take one look and sprint back to the dining area for my cameras. My first sighting at Nsefu Camp ~ Greater African Snipe. Nsefu Chalet ~ Home for the next 5 nights The view looking upstream Brunch area with the view looking downstream ...and a leopard
  3. Hi! Thanks everyone for a great forum, me and my fiancé have had a lot of help planning our safaris buy reading your posts and reviews. We have been to Tanzania (northern circuit), Botswana (Okavango Delta, Chobe and Savuti) and now Uganda (Kibale, Queen Elizabeth, Bwindi and Mgahinga). We got engaged in Botswana and we will get married in June 2019 in Flatdogs Camp in SLNP, Zambia. We will have five nights at Flatdogs with family and friends and then go with my father and his fiancée to Lion Camp for two nights... But what to do next? After this we would like to do 3 nights on our own (constrained by money). Our ideas so far is: -Mana Pools: we really would like to go here some time to see the amazing environments, famous walking and possible canoe trip. We are looking on Goliath Camp. However it will need three flights to get there (one international and two safari flights) so maybe it is best to save Mana for another trip? -Kafue? -North Luangwa? -Or just stay in SNLP in another area? We would really appreciate some advice! Have a great sunday! Fanny and Christian
  4. I’m going to tempt fate and start a new trip report whilst completing my Mara 2016 report. Preamble ~ My travelling companion Peter emailed me last January “I’ve again booked ten nights at Kaingo & Mwamba. Your welcome to join me especially as I won’t have to pay the single supplement.” And so began planning for this trip. Whilst Peter headed off to the Mara after the 10 nights I decided to stay in the South Luangwa and have a look at the Nsefu sector on the other side of the river and be able to compare two renowned Zambian safari companies. The duration of this safari was 21 days including travel. The itinerary consisted of; 1 night Pioneer Camp (Lusaka) Overnight after 30+ hours travel as we were unable to make the Proflight connection. Shenton Safaris 3 nights Kaingo Camp 5 nights Mwamba Bush Camp 2 nights Kaingo Camp Robin Pope Safaris 5 nights Nsefu Camp I did want to stay longer here but Simon King had booked out the camp for a photographic workshop so I had to find an alternative. As RPS provide a 10% discount for stays of 7 days or more at any of their camps and they do not charge Single Supplement I chose Luangwa River Lodge. 2 nights Luangwa River Lodge. The game viewing was hot and the temperatures even hotter. Approaching sunset on the first evening. Last year the lions were the stars with cameo appearances from the leopards. This year it was the leopards taking centre stage. During the day the birds were suffering in the heat. White-fronted Bee-eater Wire-tailed Swallow Elephant breeding herds enjoyed their daily drink from the river.
  5. South Luangwa, without breaking the bank. Zambia's South Luangwa Valley is one of Africa's most outstanding wildlife viewing areas. With a mixture of woodland and riverine forest, it is home to an amazing variety of animal and bird life. One of the real highlights of my recent visit was discovering that you can enjoy South Luangwa without breaking the bank. Whilst he lodges situated inside the park are expensive, US$500 per person per day, or more, there are some terrific camps & lodges located about 10 minutes drive from the park gate that will cost you around half that price. A bed is a bed The accommodation is not as fancy, with simple rather than luxurious chalets, but the guides are equally good, sometimes better. You'll see just as many animals and are just as likely to have elephants walking through your camp; the animals don't pay much attention to the park boundaries. The money you save means that you can either stay longer or put some of that saving towards a private vehicle and guide which will ensure that your game drives are focussed on the things you want to do. There are several lodges & camps that charge around US$270 per person per night for a full board package that includes all meals and 2 game activities per day. In Green (low) season those rates fall to as low as US$170 per person sharing and those who live in the area will tell you that this is the best time to visit anyway. It's cooler, it's greener, the skies are clearer and the bird life is more abundant. Park entry fees are an extra cost. Here are a few places worth checking out. Thornicroft Lodge is located on the banks of the Luangwa river and has just 9 guest chalets. It is currently looking a bit drab but the chalets are comfortable and renovations planned for early 2018 should bring it right back to the top of its game. Head guide Godfrey is one of the best working in South Luangwa. Wildlife Camp, also located by the river, has both chalets and safari tents as well as a campsite. If you'd like to vary your game viewing experience and do some walking, Wildlife Camp has a simple bush camp set up in a lovely river side location especially for walking safaris. Marula Lodge has a lovely setting with a cheerfully decorated communal lounge and dining room overlooking the river. Electric tape around the lounge is a clear reminder that elephants regularly visit the grounds. Guests I spoke to rated their guides highly. There are a couple of cons: the chalets are stone built with tin roofs and get extremely hot in summer. Some of the people I spoke to said they found it hard to sleep. The other negative point is that, because it is a budget lodge, Marula will pack 9 people onto their game vehicles. If you are serious about photography this is a real no-no, but if you just want game drives with a good guide, then why not? All three camps are just 10 minutes from the main entrance gate. All three camps have small swimming pools. The rates do not include drinks or laundry, although the laundry service and the cash bar are reasonably priced. Getting there South Luangwa is easily accessible from Lusaka using Pro Flight. The one way air fare is about US$325. Alternatively, if you have a bit more time to spare, South Luangwa can also easily be reached from Malawi – about 6 hours by road from Lilongwe. The combination of game viewing in South Luangwa and time spent relaxing on the shores of Lake Malawi is very popular. Zambia visa costs US$50 Malawi visa costs US$75
  6. 16th November 2017 : The South Luangwa NP became the first ever national park in the world to be declared "a sustainable park" by the the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO). https://www.znbc.co.zm/luangwa-national-park-one-of-the-best-unwto/
  7. A returm to Zambia. The Luangwa and Zambezi rivers Victoria Falls as, hopefully, the climax to my visit. Meaning a first, all be it quick, visit to Zimbabwe I later realised that 2017 was also the 10th anniversary of my first ever safari. All in all not a bad way to celebrate it! My schedule was as follows: 1 night Pioneer Camp Lusaka 4 nights Tafika Camp, South Luangwa National Park 4 nights Amanzi Camp, Lower Zambezi National Park 1 night Pioneer Camp Lusaka 2 nights Ilala Lodge Victoria Falls The trip was again booked through Africa Travel Resource and my contact there Anneli. Once again everything was arranged perfectly. I think the most difficult bit was trying to get the various bits of the trip to fit together particularly in the right order. Lots of puzzing of heads and trying to find 4 nights in each camp. Eventually I had to put a night in Pioneer camp in the middle of my trip. Not ideal but it meant I didn't have to change my itinerary around and start at the Falls or have private charters for flights. Ths trip was already blowing my budget, private charters were just not possible (unless I robbed a bank, and I didn't really want to do that) I added a night at Pioneer at the beginning just in case my international flights were delayed. I didn't want a re-run of last year's trip to Meru and the delayed Nairobi flight. I wanted to return to South Luangwa as I had really enjoyed my trip there a couple of years ago and also I wanted to see it in another season. Last visit was at the beginning of November, this time my visit would be at the end of June, There would be a difference, not only in temperature! Advice from ATR was to combine it with the Lower Zambezi, to give a contrast in lansdscape, flora etc. I readily agreed as I hadn't been to that park before. There would also be a contrast in camps: Tafika, rustic, a long running camp, far far out in the Northern sector of South Luangwa, very much an old style camp for the safari purist; Amanzi a new camp, not too short on extras, it even had a pool, no roughing it here! At the end of the trip I defined the contrasting camps as hardcore safari and safari light. Only the camps themselves.......the parks and the wildlife where just as good at both locations. So that was the planning and the hopes and ideas for the trip. Now you are asking what happened when I got there? Short answer...... a stupendous trip! It really was special. Fantastic wildlife. There is still something I love about the Luangwa river which I cannot explain, which is going to keep drawing me back. Lower Zambezi was a great park; completely agree with ATR that it gave a good contrast to South Luangwa. And finally the falls which basically blew my mind! Wildlife wise there were 2 BIG highlights. Still undecided if I should give you all a clue, maybe add a photo here or make you all wait till I get there in this report. I will have a think about it, but I am still erring on making you all wait But as mentioned in the title there was lots of water involved in this trip therefore end of post 1 will be a few photos of the rivers and falls. Luangwa River The Zambezi Victoria Falls
  8. South Luangwa National Park!! YAAAYYYYY!!!!! Our time in Africa this May/June actually began in Botswana, but we loved SLNP so much I thought I would do my trip reports out of order so that I could get the Zambia component out ASAP before I forgot everything. I got lazy and didn't continue with my daily journal/notes. Here we are 3 months later and so much of the information and detail, like people's names have escaped me already. Thank goodness for photos! Just note that the order of events may be totally wrong. As a bit of background this was our second time to Africa, having been to Tanzania and South Africa in 2015. That was supposed to be our once in a lifetime Africa trip, but like many before us, we fell in love with the continent and being on safari and had to return. Although as much as we loved those countries we wanted to try others, and settled on Botswana and Zambia. Zimbabwe and Namibia will have to wait till next time! Our Zambia itinerary: 2 days Vic Falls 6 days SLNP As you can probably tell from the thread title, we stayed at Flatdogs, which is a camp just outside of the Mfuwe gate. We loved our stay here so much. The staff were great, and we met some guests who were on their third return to Flatdogs. We could tell from the beginning we had made a very good choice. I would happily recommend them to anyone. Going through the pictures for this trip report is bringing back such lovely memories, and a few surprises as well. Before I go on I have to show you this! Here is a picture of a hyena I took about 30 metres away..... Now check out THIS easter egg!!! I caught this after zooming in on my computer and my jaw just about hit the floor. Now if I could just get into my time machine to go chase that leopard... I'm still shaking my head in disbelief Haha, anyway to kick off.. Our first game drive was an evening one. We had no expectations at all going in which I think is the best approach when it comes to nature, because everything is then a pleasant surprise. Our first sighting! We were delighted to find a group of hippos in a pond/lake covered in crisp green vegetation. The hippos were happily munching away, it was a gorgeous sight in the lovely afternoon glow. Rude hippo letting one rip right next to his neighbour Hamerkop hitching a ride Bird (sorry I don't know what it is!!) Owl (sorry again from the worst birder ever) Baby puku - so cute! Baboon sunset In the evening our driver Kennedy had gotten word of a leopard sighting, which of course got the excitement going. All of the jeeps were rushing in that direction and we did see it but the number of jeeps put Kennedy off from hanging around. He assured us, "Don't worry. We will find our own leopard". And find our own, he did! We had this one all to ourselves We stayed with this guy for quite some time watching him sleep and just had our sundowners in the car in silence, which was perfect for us. We are the sort of people who would skip sundowners every time if it meant more time just sitting with the animals. After a while, he decided it was time to wake up for the day I think I'm hungry Time for breakfast Here's half a baboon I prepared earlier The other party of 4 in the jeep were not keen to follow this leopard or watch it consume its meal so we had to leave, which is a big shame. We saw another leopard as well and were first to the sighting before a bunch of other jeeps showed up. We couldn't believe we had just seen 3 leopards in one night. Our jaws were agape at how great this drive was and how incredible SLNP was shaping up to be in just 3 hours! We also saw a bunch of other cool night critters. Here's a bush baby!! And a genet. This was our first good look at one. It was amazing. This one wasn't shy and we watched it for a good 10 minutes stalk and chase prey. Gosh they are cute. There ends a great first drive. No more wildlife tonight. Unless you count this little friend waiting for us back in our room
  9. I know that everyone always says "bring a fleece" and on past safaris I have done so, and often was glad that I did, when we'd hit a rain front or chilly morning. But that seems highly unlikely for South Luangwa/Lower Zambezi the first two weeks in September. It looks to me that the lowest temperatures might be in the mid 60's (that's 15-20C I think) which seems way too warm for a fleece. This is the current forecast for Mfuwe and I don't think it will change much in the next couple of weeks (except maybe get hotter!) Is Lower Zambezi even hotter than South Luangwa, or about the same? Is Victoria Falls much cooler than the Luangwa valley? We've got very light fleeces but while light, they take up space and I just have a feeling they won't get used. Would a long-sleeve t-shirt be sufficient in place of a fleece?
  10. Preamble ~ Although this was my umpteenth visit to Africa and 4th safari in the South Luangwa I hadn’t been to Africa since 2008. Whilst life had gotten in the way I had kept my enthusiasm for safaris reading the numerous TRs here on ST. In 2008 the safari finished in the South Luangwa and this is where this trip began. The duration of this safari was 28 days including travel which allowed for 11 nights in South Luangwa, then 15 days in the Mara (the Mara will be in a separate TR). Peter my travelling companion, is a TA with over 30 years experience travelling to Africa, (often 4 times a year!) Nepal, Antarctica and beyond so I let him handle all the arrangements. The itinerary was based on the cancelled trip when I broke my leg in 2015. It consisted of; 3 nights Kafunta River Lodge 5 nights Mwamba Bush Camp 3 nights Kaingo Camp Initially we had tried for Flatdogs camp but it was booked out during our travel timeframe so with a plethora of options in the Mfuwe area we replaced it with Kafunta River lodge mainly because of the cheaper rates. A decision I did not regret. I have stayed at Mwamba & Kaingo before and they are my favourite camps in SLNP. I won’t elaborate further on the camps chosen unless I’m asked and rather than give a day by day ~ blow by blow description I’ll just post some images and provide relevant comment. In this first post a few images of what you're likely to see. The sun rising over Lion Plain not far from Mwamba camp. What will the day bring? South Luangwa is renowned for leopard and this trip did not disappoint. A leopardess patiently waiting for her beau to finish his impala dinner that he did not share with her. Even so it did not affect their romance and we heard (rather than saw them) mating in the thickets the next morning. Replete with buffalo meat the Mwamba pride retires to the shade, whilst the adults snoozed some of the cubs watched the vultures game enough to try for scraps. The area around Lion Plain hosts a few lion prides. The two prides mainly seen are the Hollywood Pride (so named as they are so often filmed by the BBC etc) and the Mwamba Pride. Carmine Bee-eater in flight. I captured this image from Kaingo's Bee-eater hide. Basically a tin boat with a canvas blind (works a treat). If you are in SLNP from about August onwards thousands of these birds nest in the river banks. Spectacular fliers they are a beautiful sight. An elephant road block. The only sort of traffic jam I enjoy.
  11. Now that our very first safari is booked for 2018, my dad and I want to start improving our ID skills for birds (especially) and mammals. We'll be in Zambia (South Luangwa and Kafue National Parks) in late August and September. My searches thus far for field guides have not turned up a lot for Zambia. Do you have any recommendations of books that would help us for this area? Or should I just order guides that cover bordering countries and cross-reference lists from our chosen camps? So far, I've purchased used copies of Birds of Southern Africa (Princeton; it does cover Zambia along with many other countries) and Field Guide to the Mammals of Southern Africa (does not technically cover Zambia, although maybe it doesn't matter). We won't likely take these books along with us, so if you have any apps or pocket guides that you'd also recommend, please let me know.
  12. 1) Name of property and country: (Please also include name of property and country as topic title and include as tags as well) Kaingo Camp, SLNP, Zambia 2) Website address if known: here 3) Date of stay, including whether Green Season, Shoulder season or High season pricing (if known). September 2016, High Season 4) Length of stay: 3 Nights 5) Why did you choose this camp or lodge to stay in? Based upon what? A previous visit in 2008 6) How did you book the property, direct or agent? Were your enquiries dealt with quickly and efficiently? A friend who is a travel agent 7) How many times have you been on Safari? 15 times 8) To which countries? Kenya, Tanzania, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe 9) Which properties have you been to previously that you are comparing this one to? Comparable to Kafunta River lodge in accommodation comfort 10) Was the camp/lodge fenced? No 11) How many rooms/tents does it have? 6 chalets 12) What tent or room did you stay in? Did it have a good view? Was it overlooked or private? Unsure of chalet number, all chalets have view of Luangwa River and private. 13) How comfortably furnished was the room/tent? Very comfortable, well furnished, ensuite bathroom 14) Did you like the food? If yes, please state why. If no, please state why. Yes, excellent food 15) Was there a varied menu offering multiple choice? If vegetarian was a suitable alternative offered? (Did you have to request this in advance?) Yes. 16) What is the default dining arrangement? Single tables or communal dining? Do the guides/managers host at mealtimes? Communal dining for brunch & dinner, pre-morning activity coffee around campfire. 17) How good were the packed breakfasts/lunches if staying out on game drives? Adequate snacks & drinks for morning tea & sundowners 18) What are the game drive vehicles? Please include photo if possible. Modified modern landcruisers 19) How many guests per row? 2 per row 20) How long were the game drives and were they varied in the routes taken? 3 - 4 hours on varied routes 21) What are the standard game drive times? Are game drive times flexible: i.e., if agreed in advance, can you go out earlier than suggested and stay out later, i.e., not returning for lunch but taking supplies with you? Morning drives begin after sunrise, afternoon drives around 16:00. 22) Is this a private conservancy/concession, and what is the vehicle/lodge density like? No. The camp is one of the few permanent camps inside SLNP. At least 3 vehicles 23) If in a National Park, what is the vehicle density in the immediate vicinity? With the sister camp (Mwamba) and Lion camp nearby at times there can be a few vehicles at a sighting. 24) Are you able to off-road? Yes. 25) Are there rotation policies for sightings i.e., You face the risk of queuing or being bumped from a sighting. Possibly but rotation did not occur at any sightings whilst I stayed there. 26) What wildlife is this property known for? Did you get good sightings? Excellent leopard and lion viewing. Good elephant numbers and general plains game with diverse variety of antelope 27) How was the standard of guiding? Excellent. 28) If you had a bad experience with a guide, why? Did you report the issue to management, and if so, how did they deal with the issue? N/A 29) If you had a very good experience with your guide, please give reasons why: Tried his utmost to position the vehicle for a good photography perspectives. 30) Were staff attentive to your requests/needs? Yes. 31) Does the property support a local community conservation initiative. If so, please provide brief details and website address if known. Yes. Both community & conservation projects. 32) Safaritalk trip report link: here 33) Any other pertinent details you wish to add: Very comfortable and informal camp (more like a lodge) with nice outlook over the Luangwa river with each chalet having a private viewing deck. Other activities such as walks and game viewing from the Hippo & Carmine Bee-eater hides are available. A good place to finish off with a bit more comfort after some time at Mwamba camp.
  13. Please note there is an earlier review of Mwamba Bush camp by Optig which can be found here 1) Name of property and country: (Please also include name of property and country as topic title and include as tags as well) Mwamba Bush camp, SLNP, Zambia 2) Website address if known: here 3) Date of stay, including whether Green Season, Shoulder season or High season pricing (if known). September 2016, High Season 4) Length of stay: 5 Nights 5) Why did you choose this camp or lodge to stay in? Based upon what? A previous stay at this camp in 2008 6) How did you book the property, direct or agent? Were your enquiries dealt with quickly and efficiently? Via a friend who is a travel agent 7) How many times have you been on Safari? 15 Times 8) To which countries? Kenya, Tanzania, Botswana, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe 9) Which properties have you been to previously that you are comparing this one to? None. 10) Was the camp/lodge fenced? No 11) How many rooms/tents does it have? 4 thatched grass Chalets 12) What tent or room did you stay in? Did it have a good view? Was it overlooked or private? I think chalet #1 closest to the communal dining area and bar though still private. The view from this tent looks across the small ephemeral Mwamba river. 13) How comfortably furnished was the room/tent? Very comfortable bed and adequately furnished. 14) Did you like the food? If yes, please state why. If no, please state why. Yes, excellent food. 15) Was there a varied menu offering multiple choice? If vegetarian was a suitable alternative offered? (Did you have to request this in advance?) Varied menu for brunch and dinner. 16) What is the default dining arrangement? Single tables or communal dining? Do the guides/managers host at mealtimes? Communal brunch and dinner, pre morning game drive coffee & muffin around the campfire. 17) How good were the packed breakfasts/lunches if staying out on game drives? Adequate drinks & snacks for both morning tea and sundowners 18) What are the game drive vehicles? Please include photo if possible. modified Land Cruisers 19) How many guests per row? 2 guests per row 20) How long were the game drives and were they varied in the routes taken? Varied game routes taken. Most drives were longer than 4 hours. 21) What are the standard game drive times? Are game drive times flexible: i.e., if agreed in advance, can you go out earlier than suggested and stay out later, i.e., not returning for lunch but taking supplies with you? Morning drives 6:00 - 11:00, Afternoon drives 16:00 - 20:00 but times are flexible. If something is happening you stay out longer. 22) Is this a private conservancy/concession, and what is the vehicle/lodge density like? No. The camp is inside the National Park. At least two vehicles, though I remember 3 in use on a few days to cater for smaller groups. 23) If in a National Park, what is the vehicle density in the immediate vicinity? Vehicle density can be high at times due to the sister camp Kaingo and Lion camp in the vicinity but usually this is well managed and you can find an isolated area to yourself. 24) Are you able to off-road? Yes, though the extensive road network is excellent and well graded / maintained and this allows for very smooth driving. 25) Are there rotation policies for sightings i.e., You face the risk of queuing or being bumped from a sighting. This might be an issue but was not a problem whilst I was in camp. 26) What wildlife is this property known for? Did you get good sightings? Excellent leopard sightings and big lion prides. Elephant often in camp along with a few antelope species that frequent the waterhole behind camp. 27) How was the standard of guiding? Exceptionally high standard. 28) If you had a bad experience with a guide, why? Did you report the issue to management, and if so, how did they deal with the issue? N/A 29) If you had a very good experience with your guide, please give reasons why: Excellent rapport, knowledge and enthusiasm made for stellar company and great sightings. 30) Were staff attentive to your requests/needs? Very attentive, especially the waiters. 31) Does the property support a local community conservation initiative. If so, please provide brief details and website address if known. Yes, A few community and conservation based programs. 32) Safaritalk trip report link: here 33) Any other pertinent details you wish to add: The authentic Zambian bush camp, rough and ready though with a level of comfort. Situated in a superb game viewing area known for its predator concentrations. Enjoyable hot showers in open air bathrooms after a long dusty day. The camp waterhole allows for exceptional game viewing between game drives and access to Kaingo camps Hippo and Carmine bee-eater hides can be organised. A top notch safari experience.
  14. 1) Name of property and country: (Please also include name of property and country as topic title and include as tags as well) Kafunta River Lodge, South Luangwa N.P., Zambia 2) Website address if known: here 3) Date of stay, including whether Green Season, Shoulder season or High season pricing (if known). September, 2016 , High Season 4) Length of stay: 3 Nights 5) Why did you choose this camp or lodge to stay in? Based upon what? Chosen as a quick stop over after lengthy travel before proceeding to more remote areas of the park 6) How did you book the property, direct or agent? Were your enquiries dealt with quickly and efficiently? Via a friend who is an agent 7) How many times have you been on Safari? 15 times 8) To which countries? Kenya, Tanzania, Botswana, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe. 9) Which properties have you been to previously that you are comparing this one to? None 10) Was the camp/lodge fenced? No 11) How many rooms/tents does it have? 8 chalets on raised platforms 12) What tent or room did you stay in? Did it have a good view? Was it overlooked or private? All chalets are reasonably private with views over floodplain 13) How comfortably furnished was the room/tent? Well appointed and very comfortable. 14) Did you like the food? If yes, please state why. If no, please state why. Excellent food. 15) Was there a varied menu offering multiple choice? If vegetarian was a suitable alternative offered? (Did you have to request this in advance?) Yes a varied menu was on offer. 16) What is the default dining arrangement? Single tables or communal dining? Do the guides/managers host at mealtimes? Communal dining, Guides and Managers join the meals, one lunch for occupants of my vehicle was on a secluded raised platform with wait staff and guide. 17) How good were the packed breakfasts/lunches if staying out on game drives? Snacks & drinks offered (which is ample) for morning tea and sundowners 18) What are the game drive vehicles? Please include photo if possible. Modified Landcrusiers 19) How many guests per row? Two to a row 20) How long were the game drives and were they varied in the routes taken? 4 hours + with varied routes 21) What are the standard game drive times? Are game drive times flexible: i.e., if agreed in advance, can you go out earlier than suggested and stay out later, i.e., not returning for lunch but taking supplies with you? Supposedly 6:15 - 10:30 morning and 16:00- 19:30 afternoon but I suspect it is flexible if there is a lot of game viewing action. 22) Is this a private conservancy/concession, and what is the vehicle/lodge density like? No. The Lodge is situated just out side the park. Unsure of vehicle numbers. 23) If in a National Park, what is the vehicle density in the immediate vicinity? The lodge is opposite the southern area of the central game viewing section which is accessed via a pontoon. Hence vehicle density is low until vehicles using the main access route into the park drive down to that area. 24) Are you able to off-road? Yes, to some degree 25) Are there rotation policies for sightings i.e., You face the risk of queuing or being bumped from a sighting. Unsure, perhaps 3 vehicles to a sighting but this was never a problem during my game drives. 26) What wildlife is this property known for? Did you get good sightings? 27) How was the standard of guiding? Very good. 28) If you had a bad experience with a guide, why? Did you report the issue to management, and if so, how did they deal with the issue? N/A 29) If you had a very good experience with your guide, please give reasons why: N/A 30) Were staff attentive to your requests/needs? Yes. 31) Does the property support a local community conservation initiative. If so, please provide brief details and website address if known. Yes. A few community & conservation programs. 32) Safaritalk trip report link: here 33) Any other pertinent details you wish to add: Extremely good value for money & a bit more than a basic safari experience. A superb lodge overlooking an amazing floodplain. Bird life is prolific and mammals are often in view. For some one who is used to basic camps it is extremely comfortable with swimming pool and hot tub spa. Massages are also offered. Unfortunately for bird photographers the floodplain is under-utilised. There is a hide underneath the main deck but it faces the wrong direction for light and is next to useless unless an elephant is nearby. A better solution would be for a mobile hide on the flood plain where you can be escorted by an armed game scout. Dislike ~ A full sit down breakfast is served rather than a coffee or tea with muffin etc. This slows the process of starting the morning game drive and during the high season the nice light is quickly lost. If you are not the 1st vehicle in line at the pontoon more game viewing time is lost. Advantages/Disadvantages ~ The lodges's location is a 30 minute drive to the main access gate. If the park is inaccessible via the pontoon then a lot of game viewing time is lost. Conversely there can be some advantage to getting quieter game viewing before other vehicles get to the area. Of course if other vehicles do not arrive you are probably missing something closer to the main gate.
  15. Well here I am again. The safari itch has gotten to me. This is an improvement: usually I'm ready to book the next one about a month after I get home. I made it four months this time. Safari #5 is in the conception phase! For the "next one" I'm considering Zambia in June 2018. I am however, somewhat confused by where I should look in terms of regions. Too many trip reports are too enticing. I'll have 10 weekdays at my disposal, max and I'm trying to work the late May Monday holiday in to squeeze out a bit more time. It may be just me, but likely will include my most recent safari, intrepid gorilla trekking friend Kim, depending on itinerary and pricing. My only priority is big cats with elephants a close second. From what I gather lions and leopards are common in South Luangwa and Lower Zambezi (?) Given my ridiculously good success with cat sightings in the Mara, am I going to have comparable experiences here, or have I seen "it" in terms of cats? One stunning trip report here (apologies I forget whose it was) had wonderful leopard sightings in Zambia. I know nothing is assured...but generally speaking? If I see dogs and elephants, fine too, but not #1 priority. And what part of South Luangwa (or Zambia generally) would you recommend, if you were planning this? And not to sound like too much of a newbie but is it even worth considering splitting time between, say, South Luangwa in Zambia and Chobe in Botswana linked by a day or two at Victoria Falls, or would you keep them separate trips? So I guess my questions are, good time of year? I'm looking for the equivalent crowd experience to the Mara in February where it's excellent game with lower crowds, is June that time?. Also want the cats. Any recommendations for camps in the mid-range...no basic camping but not high end Richard Branson style. (I tentatively have my eye on Kuyenda Camp, Chindeni Camp and Mfuwe Bush Lodge, feedback welcome and alternatives desired!) I just want to have my thoughts in order from you all before I turn this over to my safari planner. Thank you in advance.
  16. Back in July/August 2008 an usual lion was born in South Luangwa NP. He was one of 5 cubs born around the same time in the Luwi pride. Some of the others drew the attention of some lion experts because of their unusual high amount of spots (one can be seen in the lower left hand of the photo), but they ignored this lion which I think is much more special! He was very lightly colored, making him stand out immediately. What was up with this lion. Some thought he was an albino, but he clearly has pigment (orange colored, not white, no red eyes). So what is it? Clearly there's a reduction or even complete absence of dark/black pigments. A condition caused by erythrism, which is either an increase in the production of red pigments, or a reduction of it (and anerythristic when there is a complete absence of it). A rare condition in lions, this is the only lion I know of which has this condition. However, Robin Pope mentioned seeing a lioness like that in 80's in the same region of South Luangwa. In his case it meant that the black behind the ears and on the tailtip appears orange, and his toe pads are pink, as can be seen in the following picture. More on this condition, with a leopard as example, can be read here. He grew up well, and turned out to stand his ground quite well, seen swiping and growling at the adults whenever they were feeding on a carcass. However, he did seem to have some trouble with his eyes, possibly caused by the fact that the skin around his eyes is lighter than usual, causing more light to enter his eyes. But he did well, and out of the 5 cubs born in the same period in the pride, him and his brother survived the first year and grew up into good looking sub-adults. But in the second half of 2011 he did what most 3 year old male lion do, he dispersed from his natal pride. I last saw him in June 2011, in those pictures you can clearly see how different he looks. After he dispersed sightings of him became rare and far in between. In 2012 there was one sighting, and there were a few other sightings from walking safaris mentioning seeing a very shy pale male lion. But in the second half of 2015 he showed up again in the main game area of South Luangwa, however, still very few sightings. But yesterday somebody posted pictures of him in the facebook group Wildlife of Zambia. Seen over Christmas, mating with a female, in the area he was born in (but which is now held by another pride). I've asked permission to post the pictures here, but until I get the permission I will just link to the facebook page here. Wildlife of Zambia Wildlife Extra also reported a few times on him in 2008, 2009 and 2011.
  17. I'm in the middle of planning a first safari with my father for August/September 2018. We plan to spend 12-15 days. Our likely trip outfitter, The Wild Source in Golden, CO, has come up with a few great itineraries. And now we're having a very hard time deciding. All three itineraries include 6-7 days in South Luangwa, staying with the Bushcamp Company (Zungulila and Bilumungwe). The other half of the trip is where we need to make some tough decisions: 1. 4 days in the Okavango with Bushmen Plains, followed by 2 days on the Chobe River on a houseboat, and one day at Victoria Falls and Gorges Lodge (If we selected this trip, we'd have a private guide/vehicle for South Luangwa.) 2. 4 days in Lower Zambezi at the Amanzi Camp. (If we selected this trip, it would be 2 days shorter, but we'd have a private guide/vehicle for the entire trip.) 3. 4-5 days in Kafue (unsure of camps yet or private guides; this one is still getting worked out). A Little About Us: As this is our first safari, virtually everything will be new to us (except maybe cattle egrets). My father is a retired wildlife biologist, so he greatly appreciates wide, open space and NO crowds. We're both birders, but we are just as excited to see new mammals and reptiles. My dad specialized in ungulates, so a variety of antelope would be great; again, though, we wouldn't need to be chasing rarities. Wild dogs would be the cherry on top of an amazing trip. Victoria Falls is not a must for us by any means. Questions: Any advice or recommendations based on what you see above? Any concerns we should consider? Have any of you spent ay time on safari on a houseboat? That part sounds a little weird to me, but it might be great for birds. Thanks in advance for your help. I don't know how I'm going to be able to wait 18 months for this!
  18. Now that I'm back from the Mara, its time to start planning the next trip. We are looking at South Luangwa/Lower Zambezi in 2017 and have the option to go either the first weeks in August, or the first weeks in September (we can't go late August due to a family event.) My agent has sent me an itinerary as follows: 3 nights Amanzi camp (Lower Zambezi) 3 nights Bilimungwe Bushcamp 4 nights Tena Tena First of all, how does that sound insofar as combination of camps? We'd love more nights but this is already at the top of our budget. (And our tour operator has already gotten us some free nights with special offers, like 3 for 2 at Amanzi, and 4 for 3 Tena Tena.) I guess we could substitute Tena Tena for a less expensive camp, like Lion Camp, to eek out more days, but I'm concerned with the possibility of six in a vehicle at Lion Camp; Tena Tena promises no more than 4. I don't see much about Amanzi camp, I know its new as of 2015. Anyone have any experience with it? Our interests are birds, leopards, wild dogs (unlikely, although I have read there was a pack near Tena Tena this season!), any more unusual critters, and of course, photography. (Would have loved to use Kaingo, for the hides, but beyond our budget. We are also keen to do some walking, finally...after many Africa safaris confined to vehicles! But not TOO much walking as its not really best for photography. As for timing...would early Sept be substantially hotter than early August? What might be the differences in wildlife sightings? I know we'd have a better chance at the Carmine Bee-eater colonies in September, but if the cost is going to be excessive heat, we might be better off in early August. Thanks for any insights.
  19. Hi all, The following question is just one (possibly small) part of my trip-planning for the next year or two. I'm trying to come up with a realistic plan for visiting South Luangwa. In this case, "realistic" includes picking a time of year that works for both my work schedule and my wife's work schedule. Likewise, it of course includes cost. And it also includes wanting a trip that provides some contrast to our visit to Namibia and Botswana last November/December (this is more for my wife's benefit than for mine, as last year's trip was her first Africa trip south of Morocco). For those who have visited South Luangwa, could you comment on what time of year you went, and whether you did--or did not--see dogs while you were there? I ask because I'm trying make sense of the various comments I've read regarding the "dog-viewing season" there. The Expert Africa web site suggests dogs are most regularly seen during February through May, and there's a thread here on ST (unless I actually saw it elsewhere) in which several posters commented that dogs seem to den away from the commonly visited areas, so that one likely wouldn't see them during the denning season (June/July/early August??). The above don't contradict each other. However, I'm been reading the Robin Pope Safaris "It's Monday" newsletter for the past year, and there seem to have been quite a few sightings during what I had assumed would be the denning season. Who can make sense of this for me? To reiterate, this is just a part of deciding "when." But I find dogs much more interesting than, for example, certain large cats, so I have to factor them into the calculus. Thanks in advance for sharing your experience. -tom a.
  20. New short video: Zikomo Safari Video www.zikomosafari.com
  21. How lucky we are that places like South Luangwe still exist. How lucky we are that we can go to them. How lucky we are at what we experienced. This is my first Trip Report, so I hope I get the level of detail right! When putting in photos, I have tried to put in some that show the environment and what the parks look like, some that show the range of wildlife that we saw, some because they tell a little story, and some because I like them! Although we saw a lot of birds, and enjoyed watching them, I am sorry that there are few photos of them (lens not long enough). Why South Luangwe? It has been about seven years since our last safari – it felt like the time was right to go to Africa again. (I travelled with my wife). We had not been to Zambia before. South Luangwe has a reputation for good game viewing and excellent guiding. On previous safaris we had done a small amount of walking and really enjoyed it. This area gave us the possibility of doing more walking. We also hoped that we would see leopard. We wanted to stay in relatively small camps, and we hoped that game drives wouldn’t be in the company of masses of other vehicles. Why August? The rains are mostly in December to March. In June, July and August the game sightings are said to get better as it gets hotter and water dries up. September and October, game concentrates around water but it gets much hotter. As we wanted to walk, we decided to go before it became too hot. How did we organise it? We looked at Safaritalk!. (especially helpful in relation to walking). We also looked at a range of other websites. We were impressed with the amount of detailed information on the Expert Africa website. We talked to them (Claire) and again were impressed with their knowledge. They had been to all of the camps we were interested in and were able to answer questions based on personal experience. They were not pushy, but seemed interested in us making a good choice. We would use Expert Africa again. We ended up deciding to go to Robin Pope Camps, but could have just as easily chosen others. The camps are more luxurious than we have used before (we have mostly done mobile camping before). What did we do? Overnight: British Airways flight London Heathrow – Lusaka Next morning: Proflight Lusaka- Mfuwe Nkwali - 2 nights Nsefu - 3 nights Bush Camp - 2 nights Tena Tena – 3 nights Pioneer Camp, Lusaka – 1 night (for early morning BA flight to London.
  22. Opening Days Special - 10% Off Regular rates From May 15, 2016 to June 15, 2016 take 10% off our regular low rates by mentioning the Promo Code: Billy The Elephant. Reservations must be booked directly.http://www.zikomosafari.com/contact/ See our new video: https://youtu.be/J3NB-zOXGBs
  23. Okay its time for another Namibia trip report. There have been a few on here lately so...... lets have another one.So for some background this was our fourth trip to Africa but first in 4 years. In 2005-06 we went to Africa for 3 months and we're supposed to get married in South Africa and spend some time in Namibia based on the advice of a Kenyan guide who called it is his favourite country. We had some unexpected expenses though and had to cut the Southern Africa portion of the trip and we were forced to get married in the Masai Mara(poor us!). 2015 has arrived and its finally time to go. I'm hedgeing my bets a bit though in case i don't love Namibia and we are going to South Luangwa where i have been desperate to go to for years thanks to some of the people on this forum. The what could go wrong part springs from previous trips and even though i don't usually suffer from bad luck in Africa something always goes wrong usually to my wife's delight. From chivalry gone wrong in Botswana to a pipe in the head in Namanga to my wedding story in the getting married in Africa thread i could have an entire thread dedicated to mishaps.And yes this trip would have a few more! Itinerary May 14 Winnipeg to Toronto to Amsterdam May 15 Amsterdam to Johannesburg with O/N at City Lodge Hotel May 16 Johannesburg to Windhoek. Drive to Swakopmund May 16-18 Swakopmund Cornerstone Guesthouse May 19 Twyfelfontein Lodge May 20-21 Grootberg Lodge May 22-23 Okaukuejo Camp May 24 Halali Camp May 25-26 Onguma Camp May 27 Kaisosi River Lodge May 28 Ndhovu Camp May 29 Camp Kwando May 30 Jun 1 Zambezi Sun Jun 2-5 Flatdogs Camp Jun 6 Lusaka Taj Pomodzi Jun 7 Lusaka to Nairobi to Amsterdam Jun 8 Amsterdam to Toronto to Winnipeg Jun 9 its over The trip was organized by Expert Africa and was well done. It was the first time i did not use a local provider though but i do prefer the local route. The trip was a self dive from Windhoek to Katima Mulilo from where we got a transfer to Victoria Falls. Our rental car was a wait for it................Volkswagon Polo Yes i know that you all think I'm crazy now but hey i made it but there were some issues that i will get to at the relevant points. I had several firsts that i wanted to achieve on this trip and i am so happy to say we got them. I lost count at 20 Rhinos in Etosha, so many Leopards in Luangwa, my first Wild Dogs as well (soooooooo exciting) Our first walking safari and so much fun in Swakopmund and Vic Falls. From this point i'll let our pictures do more of the talking but we do not have a giant lens and are still learning photography so please don't be to hard on me.
  24. http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/mar/08/ruger-american-dog-stopped-african-poachers ~ This article from the U.K. Guardian provides the background of Ruger, a three-year old Labrador retriever/German shepherd mix, who was found and trained by Working Dogs for Conservation. Ruger's keenly focussed sense of smell has enabled him to detect concealed illegal animal parts and weapons in Zambia, thereby supporting anti-poaching efforts.
  25. Hi All, I'm still rather green behind the ears when it comes to posting, but I've been lurking in the background for quite a while reading up on all things safari. I must commend all of you on the wealth of information that is on this forum, it's amazing! We just returned from our honeymoon which was both of ours first safari. We figured this trip would be a once in a lifetime splurge kind of thing. We played it safe and picked South Africa as our destination. Not knowing whether we would love safari or whether we would find it boring staring at yet another elephant/rhino/lion/etc. Needless to say it never got boring. It will come to no surprise to any of you though that now we are hooked :-) The only problem is: money. Safaris don't come cheap. We would love to return anywhere on safari this year. This once in a lifetime splurge has became a need. But we need to stick to a budget. In all fairness, we cannot justify spending more than 10.000 eur on a two week holiday (incl. flights so leaving about 4000pp for safari for say 12 nights - a tight budget by any standards). We are young professionals, still need to build a life, a house, have kids, etc. We need to keep it within reason. For any Belgian (not into safari) the number I just gave you would blow their minds, but keeping that aside and between us :-) So I was hoping to tap into you guys' vast knowledge and expertise. Are there any affordable safari's out there? Of course ideally we would love to see a different country than SA. I know you can keep the cost down by self driving in Kruger. And I know it is loved by many, but being in a closed car on a tar road with 20 other vehicles around a sighting just isn't my ideal of safari (though my experience is limited). I had found my ideal Kenya safari, but as some of you might still remember my then fiancé and now husband considers Kenya to be "dangerous". If anyone is interested , it was a mix of Porini camps, porini adventure camps (basic but seemed like great value for money) and Brian Freeman's safari camp. it came out to a bit more than the quoted 4000 but amazing value for money with small camps and private vehicle included at Freeman's (which after a honeymoon at a high end 5 star sabi sands lodge with 2 kids of around 8 years old in your vehicle you see as not a luxury but as a must ). I'm more than willing to pay the price if i get the feeling it is worth it, and with this itinerary i absolutely felt that way even if it stretched the budget. (In all honesty credit for that Kenya safari goes to @Flytraveller as it was entirely based on his trip report). I have read through the whole under 200 usd thread but nothing really jumped out at me. Ideally we would like to go around september but we'd be willing to wait off to November to have off season rates if need be. We had conceived the crazy notion that we wanted to see Botswana next. Before we go there we probably need to win the lottery. Though i'm being a tiny bit unfair since the only option worth considering that I have come across in my last days of researching safari was actually in Bots. And it is honestly very much appealing to me. The only reason I haven't pulled the trigger already is that i am maniacal about research (which given the budget is a reasonable stance to take I suppose). Another small reason may be that I haven't read anything/very little about about Kingfisher safari on here. Martin himself is an avid poster but I haven't seen any trip reports from people who actually went on their mobile safari (I saw a few mentions of Moses' Unlimited travel but the Kingfisher still comes out at about 100 usd pppn cheaper). Next I looked into Zambia, hoping that was cheaper. But it seems South Luangwa also comes with its price tag. And I would prefer to not only do walking safari. I would love to do a bit like x's trip report between camps (sorry x, but I read so many in such a short time frame that by god I can't remember your name - loved your report though!). If anyone would have any good priced options there? I was hoping to get discounts when booking multiple nights with the same safari operator but the savings still aren't even getting us close to our budget. I know 12n is pushing it, but since the flights wherever we'd go would already be about 1000, i want to make the most of it. Anyone have anything to suggestions for Tanzania? Please don't say something like serana lodges though because those types of places are my worst nightmare (overcrowded mini bus tours). I'd rather wait a year and save up than go to a place like that. The focus needs to be wildlife and not generally nature so i think Namibia is probably out. We were in Zim for a short leg of our honeymoon as well, around the zambezi river and the vic falls, and though i loved our camp, loved the people, in terms of wildlife it was a big bust (not only in comparison to SA but just generally). I can do a mobile camping private safari but I don't want to do a big bus group tour. Though they are mightily frowned upon on this forum I love plunge pools but I can happily do without :-) (if you give me lions and leopards in exchange - yes I'm sorry another unoriginal big cat devote joins the ranks ;-) ) I will do a trip report on SA soon and a lodge review (because they were all great and definitely earned our support!), but none of it compares to what I've seen on here in terms of sightings and photography. If I were you guys I would start buying some bulk lottery tickets because you are a lucky bunch from what I can tell! Longwinded post in the end to just ask for your advice on a next destination that hopefully won't break the bank, nor will require a second mortgage (fyi, they don't do those for some reason in Belgium - must not have enough safari lovers among bankers). Any help would be greatly appreciated! PS I wonder if anyone is going to read this bulk of text without any pictures :-)

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