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Found 1 result

  1. To secure the wildlife around camps in the greater Mara ecosystem, many lodge owners have over the last few years leased land for wildlife conservancies giving them the possibility to better control the wildlife experience for their guests while paying the Maasai landowners to keep the wildlife alive on their land and averting the 'de-wilding' process that normally happens as land is converted to food production...this conservancy movement has shown that leasing land to remain extensive and open, unfenced and inhabited by a wide variety of wild animal species has given the landowners very good alternative to farming and land fragmentation, and it has been good for the local Maasai people, their culture, the wildlife and the tourism industry. However, with the security issues the country has recently had to face and which undoubtedly has the potential to reduce tourism arrivals to the country, some conservancies may not be able to meet their payment commitments to their landowners....The consequences of not having these conservancy payments underwritten and guaranteed is clear; it can result in the loss of trust by landlords, reversal of all the good conservation work that has been achieved and may well prompt the removal of wildlife from these conservancies and conversion of this land to farming. Should wildlife in Kenya - or anywhere for that matter - be dependent only on the sensitive and fickle tourism industry ? What would give the wildlife conservancies more financial resilience?

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