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Tomas

Members
  • Content count

    134
  • Joined

  • Last visited

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150 Excellent

About Tomas

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Previous Fields

  • Category 1
    Tour Operator
  • Category 2
    Resident in Africa/Former resident

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.abergsafaris.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Iringa Tanzania
  • Interests
    Photo, wildlife traveling
  1. @@COSMIC RHINO The poaching is still there not as bad as before if that is because there is a harder time for the poachers to find elephants or because of the measures the Tanzanian government is taking against poaching I do not know. When it comes to live animal export it is in a terrible shape and it is good that they stop it. The next big wildlife threat I think is smuggling wild animals, it is way to common. I even got asked from a smuggler to find tortoises and terrapins for her and other animals, I of course said, -no way! I would like to start more intelligence gathering and even small sting operations but I have no such authority here, But maybe if the government or any agencies will ask me I will be game, I have experience from my work as a investigating police officer in Sweden.
  2. @@optig That movie from "Green hills" was one of the worst I have seen firstly this was not hunters this was criminals!! They should not only have revoked the hunting licence the ones responsible for this "safari" belong in prison. Poaching is still bad in Selou unfortunately and the area need even more protection and more money hunting and I mean real hunting is a really good way of doing this but the money need to go back to the wildlife at least a good portion of it.
  3. Here are some reviews http://www.dpreview.com/news/4939144988/nikon-d500-studio-and-dynamic-range-tests-published
  4. I am saving up for a D500 and a Sigma 150-600 sport maybe it will be a Nikon 200-500 instead but the Sigma has got excellent reviews. I am selling my house and land next to a golf course in southern Tanzania so I can afford this (o:
  5. I truly enjoy reading this posts even if the tone is sometimes sharp I must say that it is refreshing much better than any other forum I ever visits, the tone is mostly polite and nice. Conservation is a heart topic for me and thou I am more comfortable to discus in my home language Swedish not the least because of my dyslexia, I hope that I get thru anyway. When it comes to poaching of birds of prey I think the authorities should do something about it by going after the people doing this, I also think that licenses to hunt some birds of prey when their is problem individuals is a good idea. Or like we do in Sweden sometimes with migrating birds of prey, catch them and give them a ride for some Swedish miles, 10km=1 Swedish mile, then they go on their merry way without stopping at the habitat where we don't want them to hang around because of grouse or pheasant. Very seldom but sometimes you can get permission to kill birds of prey but very seldom. I have been working at farms in Sweden that are raising grouse and trying to get a population to grow from almost nothing to how it was before the pesticides and the big big mono cultures of different crops. I also know that especially the goose hawk is not liked by this farmers that instead of having a lot of crops and pesticides try to bring back the wildlife and earn money from hunting. I have done some dirty deed when I was younger and worked as a "slave" on this farms, but would never shoot a hawk again illegally. The other birds of pray like the harrier and other medium sized and really big birds of pray we do not usually see as a problem. The birds of prey actually increases in these areas because of more mice, rats rabbits and insects other birds also benefits a lot from the hunting. So my conclusion when it come to northern Europe and the farmed biotops there that are used as hunting farms is that all wildlife benefits greatly. The moors of Scotland is of course different but I would think they also benefits from hunting. When it comes to shooting as many birds as possible for one day a few times every year it is not my coup of te but I know that the wildlife benefits and the disturbance to the wildlife is very small because of the few times maybe only 2-3 times a year the area is hunted. I personaly like to hunt over a Setter or a Spaniel and my most enjoyable hunts I have had alone over my Spaniel in the fields or with my Finish Spitz in the deep Swedish forest. Hunting is the best way to keep areas wild. Exemptions is there because of bad practice sometimes and those should be dealt with but that GB should not be ashamed over this hunting, not at all. There are much worse things that goes on. I specifically do not like at all when a lot of hounds are used at the same time after the same prey like deer or in Sweden sometimes bear.
  6. I would recommend Andersson safaris in Arusha they have been doing safaris for 30 years. See if you can join a group that have some seats over, that way you can get a nice safari for not to much money.
  7. @@Towlersonsafari I think that killing birds of prey is done by criminals and they should be prosecuted not punish a hole group and so that argument against grouse hunting does not apply!! When it comes to shooting wild birds a few times a year and shot a lot I do not see any wrong in that me myself prefer to hunt more often and shoot a couple of bird at the time over my setter but that is just my opinion and what I like. Should driven hunting where they shoot a lot of birds a few times a year be baned? No I do not think so but like everything else nothing is black and white. Some of this hunt is done on raised birds that have been free just some days and are planted by the PH so the clients can shoot a lot of birds. I do not think this is hunting and a bad practice. It is not evil it is not bad and it helps to keep the countryside alive. If someone do not like hunting that is ok but to "hunt" the hunters in a kind of witch hunt is not ok.
  8. Again if any want to engage me in further discussion about the subject they first have to discuss the fact that a hole group or a hole hunting method is bashed because of what some unidentified criminals are doing. That is in my view not ok and no argument against hunting at all or at least a very poor argument. Then we can taker apart one argument after an other to see if they hold true. And after that we can talk feelings and private opinions because that is an other thing and everyone is entitled to have his own opinion and to feel something about what ever, that can never be wrong.
  9. It is not evidence enough you have chosen to write your argument like it was argumentet in court and therefore it should hold at least a little of the same quality when it comes to the evidence in this case it soes not. But my point is that you can not point towards a hole group and accuse them for crimes of a few unknown individuals! Do you think that that is an approach that is sound?
  10. I will just argue one point in @@Towlersonsafari original post but there are many more to argue against, and some to agree on to some extent. The point is about the illegal killings of birds of pray. First I condemn this acts, but that is not the point. The point is, as a former investigator and police I have been in many courts, and a prosecuter that argued that a group should be sentenced for criminal activities done by a unknown small percentage that may or may not be from a certain group would have stayed prosecuter for that trial only!!! This is more the way of people that is ready to brake the law for their beliefs. I could argue a lot more about the text, but I will stick to this one first and if anyone want to discus or argue with me he/she has to discus that point first and not start anything like: -BUT is it ok to hunt birds for sport. Only this point about making decisions on guesses and punish a hole group for what some few criminal individuals is doing nothing else.
  11. To count animals is an art and really difficult! I have used so many methods, counting by air, tracks, observations, droppings, dna, in different environments from snow to savanna. We usually have one nr that is a minimum and one probable and one maximum. It is so many variations and factors so it is hard and often a lot of people involved. For wolf in Sweden the nr of a population has been calculated by dna from dropping (0% dubble counting), combined with tracks during the snowy period involving several hundred even over a thousand people in huge areas almost as big as selou. Still you don't get a 100% correct number but a minimum a probable and a maximum all conservation efforts and hunting quotas uses the minimum number as the "truth" For the cheetahs it see ms like a dna approach w ould be sensible but expensive, you could ask al guides to pick up cheeta dropping, record the spot and then report it. The plus side with this is that you can see how the cheetahs is doing if they are inbreed like they usually are more or less. I have done most recordings in Europe so I have no idea how they count in Africa more than the countings by air I have been involved in. Any that can shed more light on how counting is done?
  12. As a tour operator and safari leader I have had great safaris with a group, but they can also be not so nice and really straining for me (o: A small group of 4 is not bad at all, and if you pair people together in the right way usually no problem at all. It is important for the tour operator or lodge/camp to really know how people behave and pair accordingly. Bigger then 4 is not as nice. I have had people over the age 60+ and they are usually a pleasure to guide even in bigger groups. Young backpackers in big groups can be a nightmare, in smaller groups I can handle them and slow them down to enjoy the nature but bigger groups, phu That my view as a safari leader. My self I like to go only with one driver and me. A good driver that is not scared of animals and can read them is important. So private safari is my thing and I wish I had more time for that, I live in Tanzania but are out in the bush far to seldom by my self.
  13. Great @jeremie@jeremie they need all the support they can get, good initiativ. The two rangers that got wounded are getting better and Erik is hopefully out of the hospital in a week. I am thinking of going to Garamba and say hello when he is back, have to save up some money first.
  14. @@Krycon If you are going to Tanzania the drones are not allowed in the parks except with a special permission and you have to fix that with the embassy before you leave your country.
  15. @@Game Warden I would love to eat crayfish here in Tanzania I fish a lot back home in Sweden and love them. In Sweden they cost around 15-25 dollars a kilo. Hmm I wonder if I can get some somewhere i could have a great Crayfish party like we have in Sweden!! A lot of Crayfish a lot of vodka shots and silly games.

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