MattMiller

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About MattMiller

  • Rank
    Member

Previous Fields

  • Category 1
    Writer
  • Category 2
    NGO

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  • Website URL
    http://blog.nature.org/science/author/mmiller/

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Boise, Idaho
  • Interests
    Mammals, natural history, travel, books, freshwater fish, fishing, distance running
  1. It's one of those questions that seems to invariably come up at conservation meetings: how do we get Chinese consumers to not buy ivory? My colleague Hazel Wong recently led an effort to poll potential consumers on what messages would dissuade them. This is probably not a surprise, but moralizing and demonizing don't work. And yet that is what many conservationists still do. Hazel has been a leader in conservation messaging and I think this research could help create better outreach campaigns. As she says, "We can't just wag our finger at China and expect things to change." Read more: How Can Conservationists Convince Consumers to Not Buy Ivory?
  2. Yes, U.S. national parks have some well-known wildlife viewing: wolves, grizzlies and wolves in Yellowstone comes to mind. But there's a range of other wildlife sightings. I compiled a list of some of the lesser-known biological wonders in our national parks. How many have you seen? 10 Overlooked Wildlife Experiences in U.S. National Parks
  3. Elephant poaching has declined by 35 percent since 2012 on community conservancy lands in northern Kenya. Research has also indicated that elephants are less stressed when they're on community lands. Here is my blog on this news and why community-based conservation is working.
  4. Here is a fun citizen science project to do when you can't be on safari. My colleague Lisa Feldkamp has the details on Wildebeest Watch, an effort to document camera trap images of wildebeests. You go through the images and document behaviors. Read the full details here.
  5. @@wilddog Thanks. Yes, it would have been ideal if a tracking device could have been fitted. Unfortunately, no seal researchers were anywhere near the scene, and at least the seal was released unharmed. Greg Hofmeyr, quoted in the article, is fitting Subantarctic fur seals with satellite tracking devices when these seals show up off the coast of South Africa. Hopefully that reveals more about their wandering ways!
  6. A Subantarctic fur seal was recently caught by fishermen (and released) off the coast of Kenya -- farther north than this species has ever been recorded. Here is my blog on why this might have happened. It includes a bit about Subantarctic fur seal biology, conservation and their wandering habits. A few are recorded off the coast of South Africa each year, so keep your eyes open...
  7. I thought members of this forum might be interested in my latest blog, the surprising story of how the bontebok was saved from extinction. It includes photos from my September trip to South Africa. Any thoughts welcome. Best, Matt Miller science writer The Nature Conservancy
  8. Thanks. I fixed the link -- it should work now.
  9. I recently wrote a blog on best night safaris, based mainly on my own travels (with 2 dream destinations added). They include my trips to see aardvarks & black-footed cats, tree kangaroos, black-footed ferrets and more. Hope it gives you some more ideas. Top 10 Night Safaris

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