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  1. 22 likes
    The road from the border crossing leads straight into Bukavu. Bukavu is the capital city of South Kivu province. It sits along the southern coastline of Lake Kivu with it’s five peninsulas jutting out into the lake. The buildings of the city are built up from the lakeside and into the surrounding hills. It was obviously once a very beautiful place with it’s many art deco buildings and even now still has bags of character and colour. However, the road infrastructure has disintegrated and is now virtually non-existent with everywhere in a bad state of disrepair. Traffic is very busy and driving here is definitely not for the faint-hearted – imagine Delhi at rush hour but without any roads or pavements. Horns are blaring constantly and the motorbike is king. In order to make any headway Martin just drove into gaps that weren’t there and then you would find that a motorbike had followed in next to you. I have no idea how we didn’t become one big pile up of vehicles. It was quite an experience – and actually great fun (for us at least)! After a while we trundled down a little side street, through some metal gates and into the oasis of calm and greenery that is the Orchids Safari Club. We were in room 1 which was at one end of a line of ground floor rooms with terraces that look directly out onto the lake. There is just a small strip of grass between the end of the tiled terrace and the steep slope down to the lake and great views across to part of the city and the next peninsula. Here are some pictures showing the hotel room and gardens. Whoops, just noticed me in the mirror. The lake at the end of our terrace. The lovely hotel gardens. View of a lake jetty and Bukavu.
  2. 14 likes
    We then had to take a quick detour to use the bathrooms before returning to the lions again. PA060620 Pugmarks by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060623 Pugmarks by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060624 Pugmarks by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060626 Pugmarks by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060628 Viewpoint by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063800. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063823. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063840-4 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063848. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063860.-2 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063872. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063876. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063882. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063907 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063924.-2 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063953.-1 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063979 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063997.-1 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064004. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064025.-1 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064026.-2 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064033.-1 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064036.-1 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064041. African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064046 African Lion video by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064056 (2) African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  3. 14 likes
    06/10/17 Twee Rivieren to home PA060473 Dusk by Jo Dale, on Flickr Our flight out of Upington wasn’t until 1710 so we had time enough for a drive in the park. We first spotted a pair of Black-shouldered Kites, then a distant Cape Fox along the Nossob road. A Yellow mongoose was on the hunt for some breakfast, and then we passed the Verreaux’s Eagle Owl nest, the chick was back. PA060048 Black-shouldered Kites by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060078 Cape Fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060096 Yellow Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060150 Verreaux's Eagle Owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr As we carried on we came across a few cars, all watching something. This turned out to be our two male lions that we’d seen on our first day. But they were a lot closer this time! One of them walked right by the side of the vehicle, giving mum a near heart attack! She started squealing like a startled dikdik at me to wind the window up as this big lion peered at her through the back window.. Now I am not normally nervous around lions, but I was certainly getting a little concerned at the racket she was making in the back! I had to tell her to pipe down a bit, lest the lions think she was on the menu! PA060477 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060500 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060529 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060537 (2) African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060541 (2) African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060544 (2) African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060550 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060570 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060573 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060605 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060617 African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  4. 14 likes
    A Lanner Falcon shot overhead and then we came up to some Springbok resting. The rain had left its mark as ants had started an emergence. This brought out their predators who didn’t want to miss an opportunity for a good feed. We were treated to fabulous views of a pair of Bat-eared Foxes foraging in the riverbed. It was a wonderful opportunity to get a good look at this usually nocturnal mammal. PA053098 Lanner Falcon by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053130 Springbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053157 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053197 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053204 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053230 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053242 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053254 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053257 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053263 Video of Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053274 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053280 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053309 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053317 Bat-eared fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  5. 14 likes
    05/10/17 Twee Rivieren PA052867 Cape Glossy Starling by Jo Dale, on Flickr It was our last full day in the park. The sun was shining, the rain had passed and we headed out on the Nossob road. Our first sighting was of a colony of Brants’s Whistling Rats. We watched them foraging for a while and then carried on. PA052884 Whistling Rat by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA052897 Whistling Rat by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA052909 Whistling Rat by Jo Dale, on Flickr A Jackal was drinking at a water hole. An ostrich wandered past. PA052967 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA052984 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA052985 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA052987 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053001 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053015 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053026 Ostrich by Jo Dale, on Flickr Peering out of its den, a Cape Fox watched the world go by. PA053050 Cape Fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr We carried on, and came across a party of foraging meerkats. Always a delight to watch. PA053055 Meerkats by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053056 Meerkats by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053067 Meerkats by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053092 Meerkats video by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  6. 14 likes
    Our guide spotted a huge puff adder on the road and carefully coaxed it to move off the road with his vehicle. PA040459 Puff Adder by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042690 Puff Adder by Jo Dale, on Flickr The rain kept coming and our sightings became increasingly soggy, including jackals shaking off the worst of the rain from their coats. PA042605 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042620 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042622 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042626 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042624 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042623 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042722adj Marico Flycatcher by Jo Dale, on Flickr A dishevelled Spotted Hyena, seemed to be following a jackal. I had really hoped we would get to see a Brown Hyena, but sadly it wasn’t to be. Still, it was nice to see our only spotty of the trip. PA042649-1adj Spotted Hyena by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042653. Spotted Hyena by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042669. Spotted Hyena by Jo Dale, on Flickr Common Fiscals and Marico Flycatchers represented the few small birds that braved the weather A Kori Bustard seemed to be getting turned on by the cool rain, strutting around in display. PA042595 adj Common Fiscal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042596 adj Common Fiscal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042603 adj Common Fiscal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042729 Kori Bustard by Jo Dale, on Flickr Springbok were also in a strange mood, pronking about in the rain, whilst a Martial Eagle surveyed the land with apparent disdain. PA042746 Springbok pronking by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042745 Springbok pronking by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042753 Springbok pronking by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042749 Springbok pronking by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042750 Springbok pronking by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042809 Springbok pronking by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042840 Martial Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr After dinner we took a night drive. It was freezing cold but at least dry. We saw quite a few animals, Springhares, Black Backed Jackals, Bat-eared foxes, Cape Fox, Scrub Hare and a probable Small Spotted Genet, but mostly at a distance so I didn’t manage to get any new photos other than one of a Rufous-cheeked Nightjar. PA040463 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA040465 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA040466 adj Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA040467 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042852 by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  7. 14 likes
    There was a short debate about whether to drive out that afternoon as the weather was really set in. But we had nothing to lose by going out and little really to gain from staying in, so off we went back up the Nossob road again. PA042243 Northern Black Korhaan by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042268 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr This proved to be an excellent decision as we encountered another group of vehicles all seemingly watching something on the left in the dunes. Mum was first to spot that it was a beautiful leopard! This was a different female, Namabies - a 3 year old female. She was walking between Kij kij and Melkvlei, striding along up and down a dune, stopping occasionally to wash herself and sitting down occasionally before seemingly getting spooked and running off over the dune. This was around 1400. PA042345 Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042355 Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042367 Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042388 Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042413 adj Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042423 adj Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042447 adj Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042515 adj Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042519 Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042578 adj Leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr Unless you're a Bon Jovi Fan, you might want to watch the video with the sound off!
  8. 13 likes
    Well after spending quite some time watching these two boys, once they decided to take a nap we carried on. There wasn’t a lot else of note before it was time for us to go, just a couple more Northern Black Korhaans. PA064081 Northern Black Korhaan by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA064094 Northern Black Korhaan by Jo Dale, on Flickr We stopped for lunch at a lodge en route to Upington spotting a nice Groundscraper Thrush and then were dropped off at Upington a few hours before our flight. This ended our epic road trip in South Africa and our journey home was quite uneventful. PA060165 Groundscraper Thrush by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060178 Groundscraper Thrush by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060161 by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060633 Our little Chariot by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA060634 The gang1 by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063798 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA063794 scenic shot of the moon by Jo Dale, on Flickr The end!
  9. 13 likes
    A rather photogenic pair of jackals seemed at ease with our presence and we spent some quality time with them. PA053672 Black-backed Jackals by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053681 Black-backed Jackals by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053682 Black-backed Jackals by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053684 Black-backed Jackals by Jo Dale, on Flickr Then another meerkat, digging a hole. PA053693 Meerkat by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053696 Meerkat by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053700 Meerkat by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053703 Meerkat by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053705 Tawny Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr We took a sunset drive and first stopped for the Verreaux’s Eagle Owls on the Nossob Road. The chick was on the ground and seemed to be temporarily stuck in a burrow of some kind, but it eventually worked its talons free and seemed to be fine, the parents looking on with disdain. PA053713 Verreaux's Eagle Owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053729 Verreaux's Eagle Owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053740 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr It was a supermoon that rose over the Kgalagadi. It was a cold night and the best we could manage, despite a long, chilly drive over the dunes to search for honey badgers was a Cape Hare and and another Bat-eared Fox. PA053756 Full moon rising by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053764 Full moon rising by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053768 by Jo Dale, on Flickr Cape Hare by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053789 Bat-eared Fox by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  10. 13 likes
    04/10/17 Mata Mata Kalahari Tented Camp The weather had closed in overnight and we awoke to a wet, blustery day. We had Jackals and Kori Bustards around camp as we had breakfast and then, after packing up, we left around 8 am and drove from Kalahari Tented Camp towards Twee Rivieren. PA041774 Black-backed Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041777 Yellow Canary by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041782 Southern Grey-headed Sparrow by Jo Dale, on Flickr We had some lovely views of Giraffes on the ridge line sunlit against the brooding sky. PA041789 Southern Giraffes by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041799 Southern Giraffes by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041805 Southern Giraffes by Jo Dale, on Flickr A Pale Chanting Goshawk struggled against the wind, whilst a Tawny Eagle judiciously roosted with its wings firmly braced against its body. PA041812 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041819 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041834 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041833 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041837 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041888 Tawny Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041876 Tawny Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041873 Tawny Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041888 Tawny Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr A pair of Spotted Thick-knees were seen along the riverbed and a Gabar Goshawk was perched in a tree. PA041952 Spotted Thick-knee by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041966 Spotted Thick-knee by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041985 adj Gabar Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA041995 adj Gabar Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr Then a real treat, a gorgeous black-maned lion sauntering along the riverbed with an attendant parade of vehicles following along. We watched for a while as he paced along. PA042030 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042048 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042157 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042162 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA042174 adj African Lion by Jo Dale, on Flickr We saw a few more birds, nothing else new and checked back into to Twee Rivieren. PA040456 Sociable weaver nests by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  11. 11 likes
    Another Southern Pale-chanting Goshawk posed on the riverbed, and then we spotted a more distant Black-shouldered Kite and another Ostrich. PA053347 Southern Pale Chanting Goshawk by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053350 Black-shouldered Kite by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053356 Ostrich by Jo Dale, on Flickr Foraging in the shade was an African Hoopoe, its mohican standing to attention. PA053364 African Hoopoe by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053367 African Hoopoe by Jo Dale, on Flickr Continuing on, we came up to a waterhole where a herd of Gemsbok were hanging out. PA053402 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053412 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053422 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053431 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053473 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053476 Gemsbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053491 Sociable Weaver by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053499 Sociable Weaver by Jo Dale, on Flickr We cut back across the dunes onto the Mata Mata road and headed back towards Twee Rivieren. We encountered a herd of Giraffes, one was particularly dark in colour. PA053509 Southern Giraffe by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053526 Southern Giraffe by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053535 Southern Giraffe by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053539 Southern Giraffe by Jo Dale, on Flickr More Tawny Eagles perched in the trees and then we sighted a beautiful russet coloured Slender Mongoose. Quick as a flash, it was gone! PA053555 Springbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053573 Springbok by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053582 Tawny Eagles by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053597 Slender Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr PA053630 Slender Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr
  12. 8 likes
    Another day another sortie if this snail is to catch the tortoise let alone the hare although I did say at the beginning that this year would not/could not be so productive. A shame really as I did so want to do justice to the nice new Nikkon that I won for BY2017. Thanks Matt! To commence with a special for @elefromoz as these are simply irresistible and at times even downright insistent. A lovely springtime singer. 43 Mark 3. And an improvement on last time's Blackbird. We can always get a better one. They are like buses. You can wait for ages for the first one to come along. 65. Eurasian Blackbird. Ballakesh Plantation. Isle of Man. Time to get on with the scorers:- 66.Blue Tit. Ballakesh Plantation. Isle of Man. Feeding on new buds.
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    Not done all of today yet. I got called away. 67. Great Tit. Ballakesh Plantation. 68. Chaffinch. A nice male in the Pink, pink! Ballakesh Plantation. Indeed the more observant of you will note it is in the same tree as the Tits and Blackbird .Even our Plantations are small over here.
  14. 5 likes
    And now for something completely different. A BIF. Actually the first Common Kestrel I have seen for ages and I never even got one for BY2017 at all. So I am making the most of this one that flew over. 69. Common Kestrel. Over Ballakesh Plantation. Just look at that blue sky. No Photoshop here. WYSIWYG! Now we enter EBC territory although I am fairly comfortable that I well get these birds later in the year. But......oft said so I will score the more improbable one. 70. Can you see what it is yet? Point of Ayre. And finally with no score just a suffix. 70B. Common Guillimots. Good to see them coming inshore again. Point of Ayre. .
  15. 2 likes
    For travellers from India you now no longer need to apply for your Visa prior to travel in Zimbabwe and can purchase your Visa on arrival, making things much simpler for you. This is all part of Zimbabwe's push to increase arrivals and make things a bit easier for foreign travellers.
  16. 1 like
    Zambia 2017 / Liuwa Plains NP & Kafue NP, November Well, after my first trip in August I returend to Zambia in mid November for a second time in 2017. The Liuwa Plains NP was always a big dream of mine until last year. Before that I just not had the chance to go there as the only options available were out of my budget. Even now with the new King Lewanike Lodge (first permanent) in the park, the option was not given until I've seen the offer from Jeffery & McKeith Safaris . The documentary about Lady Liuwa "The last Lioness" a few years ago was the inital driver behind my interest to go on Safari on my own. The only time before was as a child once at a young age in South Africa. So the Liuwa always had a special interest in my heart from the beginning. Maybe it's also the remotness and the off map Safari destination, solely compared by visiting numbers. I think a few years ago when the documentary was produced, yearly visitors were about 50 people. The year before I discussed this with Ty on my regular visit to Musekese and he mentioend that he would like to do something more "camping" style in the Liuwa as well in 2017. I was giving my highest thoughts about it and kept my mind open for a possible Liuwa trip. And later on in the early 2017 I've seen their FB trip information and just enquired to be on boat on that trip. Actually with the offer from Jeffery & McKeith Safaris Zambia, I was finally able to got to this fine park in the remote Western part of Zambia. It was not sure at the beginning if Phil would be on the trip as well, depending on bookings @ Musekese. But a few days before we left I get the final confirmation that he would also on board on that fantastic trip. So we would be 3 guests and 2 guides and 2 staff at Liuwa. Itenerary: Day 1 - Pioneer Lodge, Lusaka Day 2 - Katoyana Campsite, Liuwa Plains NP Day 3 - Katoyana Campsite, Liuwa Plains NP Day 4 - Katoyana Campsite, Liuwa Plains NP Day 5 - Katoyana Campsite, Liuwa Plains NP Day 6 - Musekese Camp, Kafue NP Day 7 - Musekese Camp, Kafue NP Day 8 - Musekese Camp, Kafue NP Day 9 - Musekese Camp, Kafue NP So the major goal on this trip was definitely the Liuwa part but I also wanted to see the Kaufe and Musekese in particular once during the green season. After several visits in the dry season. Unfortunately there were no chances to see Lady Liuwa anymore, as she passed away in early August in 2017. Nevertheless the whole trip was phenomenal and I was more then just happy to visit Liuwa and the Kafue during that part of the year. Day 1 After getting on time to Lusaka I was picked up by Pioneer for a short transfer from the airport to the Lodge. I just arrived in the late afternoon and had a nice little shower after a long journey in the same clothes....Afterward I was heading into the main area where a nicely stocked bar was on offer to be examined and where I would later on would have my dinner. Outside view of my chalet, they have 3 different types of accomodation on the compound. Miomba Chalet (Like mine) are the biggest ones, then they have Safari Chalets which are smaller and Tents. Tents have no en suite bathrooms, instead they have shared ones. Very nice chalet and compound. The whole area is very nicely fitted into the landscape and it's not far from the airport. So makes this camp a very good option for 1n stayover in Lusaka if needed. Large bathrooms Day 2 On the next morning and stll quite early I left Pioneer for the aiport. Here at camp I met the 2 other guestes who would join me on the trip to the Liuwa Plains. Short drive to the airport and to the check-in process at the Proflight terminal. The weight limit on this route are more limited then on other routes with Proflight, my hand luggage was 15kg so definitely to heavy and I had to pay for that overweight 60USD! Ok for both ways as I lernt later on, as there is no "terminal" at the airstrip at Kalabo. So for both legs it was fine. We also met Phils father Richard who was on duty to check in a coolin box on our flight for our party at Liuwa. Logistics at it's finest! Our flight to Kalabo was scheduled for 8.10 am. which was on time, we thought. Once in the airplane, they closed the airport, because the President would arrive. We then saw a helicopter arriving with the President and the red carpet was there as well. We couldn't get off but were trapped in as they were supposingly waiting for some "guests of some importannce" to arrive. Just to remember, these were the last days of Mugabe and even our pilot was joking probably it's him or someone in negotiating process of the whole theater, as Zambia/Zim is still quite close especially Lungus PF and the Zanu-PF in Zim. So we were standing outside our plane as a wecloming comitee (the closest ones to the runway), once a private jet landed and passed us in front of us. We couldn't see anyone but we were finally in the position to get back into the airplane as they would lift the "airport closing" ban. Last but not least with about 1-1.5 hours delay we could take off. View from the sky over a cloudy Lusaka. It looked very wet and it was at that stage looking for some more showers in the Lusaka area. I hoped for the best for the Western part of the country as by some locals in the bar on the night before, the forecast looked better or let's say less rainy in that part of the country for the next few days. The Kafue River. Flying westwards was nice, especially to enjoy some finer weather. We had some other guests in the Caravan who left us at Lufupa airstrip in the Kaufe. Here we met Phil who joined us onto the route to Kalabo. Ty was already in the Liuwa with the car and some help from staff from Musekese. The Zambezi river close to Kalabo. Beautiful view eh? Going down slowly as we were close to our final destination Kalabo. Kalabo town...not the outskirts.. Te Hangar with a nice welcoming sign of African Parks and the Logo of the Liuwa Plain NP. The airport is in Kalabo Town, still outside of the park. The pilots made the plane ready to fly back to Lusaka with a bunch of other guests leaving this beautiful part of Zambia. Our vehicle was alread parked there on the strip and after sorting out our luggage we were off, driving through Kalabo to the main office into the park, where Phil would pay the Park entry fees. We waited and had some packed lunch whilst waiting there. A few meters away was the river which we would have to cross with our car on a pontoon moved by hand. After some tme driving after the river crossing we entered the park unnoticed, but here we are.....first large flocks of wildebeest as a welcoming party. Later on some Zebras as well and now you also can see why these are called the Liuwa Plains.....no tree just a plain area. We finally arrived at Katoyana Campsite where we would have 2 sites for our one purpose. All the tents were already set up, dome tents but very comfy and high enough to stand inside. I will show some more details later one here. As it was already 5pm we decided to go for a very short drive as it was a long day already. And shortly just outside the campsite, the first Hyena sighting! I always had bad luck with them and have not seen the for several years, last time in the SLNP. Some parts of the plains are full with different types of amaryllies. A lovely first sundowner with a small group of wildebeest just in front posing. It was an absolute dream to have my old Nikon 135mm f/2.8 AI-s lens with me. That one creates an unbelievable color rendition. A first short start in the Liuwa Plains on arrival!
  17. 1 like
    @Peter Connan, I can only imagine your surprise when the small car suddenly appeared from nowhere and took that strange direction. They were lucky to have an experienced traveller like yourselves close-by, who took the initiative to investigate and assisted them to their lodge. This is a very interesting discussion and selfdrivers going off-road must never ever put all their trust in Google Maps only. We always take a hard copy map with us on a journey and find the large scale of it makes it easier to orientate oneself.

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